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HARVARD 
MEDICAL LIBRARV 




IN THE 



Francis A.Countway 
Library of Medicine 



BOSTON 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School 



http://www.archive.org/details/announcementofme5051harv 



'* 



Frontispiece copyright by 
Dr. Walter Willard Boyd 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



OF THE 



HARVARD MEDICAL 
SCHOOL 

AND 

SCHOOL OF DENTAL 
MEDICINE 



2 5 SHATTUCK STREET 
BOSTON • MASSACHUSETTS 



1950-51 



WITH AN ANNOUNCEMENT FOR 1951-52 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY 



CONTENTS 

PACE 

Medical School Calendar 5 

President and Fellows of Harvard College 7 

The Board of Overseers 8 

Administrative Officers 10 

Administrative Board 10 

History and Organization 12 

Buildings 13 

Hospital Facilities 13 

Hospital Appointments 17 

School of Dental Medicine 17 

Libraries 18 

Warren Anatomical Museum 18 

Requirements for Admission 19 

Admission to Advanced Standing 21 

Information for Servicemen 22 

General Regulations 22 

Examinations and Promotion 23 

Withdrawal from the School 24 

Degrees 25 

Higher Degrees in the Medical Sciences 26 

Student Employment 28 

Microscopes 29 

Fees and Expenses 29 

Dormitory 30 

Bond Required of Students 30 

Medical Attendance 30 

Fellowships and Scholarships 31 

Prizes 41 

Loan Funds 41 

Lectureships 42 

Cancer Commission of Harvard University 42 

Proctor Fund 43 

William W. Wellington Fund 43 

Courses for Graduates 43 

School of Public Health 44 

Opportunities for Research 44 

Predoctoral Fellowships 45 

The Undergraduate Assembly 45 

Division of Studies 46 

3 



4 CONTENTS 

Announcement of Courses 47 

Anatomy 47 

Physiology 50 

Biophysical Chemistry 51 

Biological Chemistry 52 

Bacteriology 53 

Pathology 55 

Tropical Public Health 58 

Pharmacology 59 

Legal Medicine 60 

Medicine 60 

Dermatology 70 

Neurology and Psychiatry 71 

Neurology 75 

Neuropathology 75 

Psychiatry 76 

Ophthalmology 77 

Howe Laboratory of Ophthalmology 79 

Radiology 79 

Pediatrics 80 

Obstetrics 85 

Preventive Medicine 87 

Surgery 88 

Gynaecology 94 

Orthopaedic Surgery 95 

Otology and Laryngology 97 

Medical Military Science 98 

Announcement of Courses, School of Dental Medicine . . . .100 

Tabular View of Courses in Medical School 108 

Degrees Conferred in 1950 .112 

Internships, Class of 1950 116 

Students Enrolled in Medical School 120 

Summary 136 

Colleges Represented 137 

Decrees Conferred in School of Dental Medicine in 1950 . . . -139 

Students Enrolled in School of Dental Medicine 139 

Summary 141 

Colleges Represented 141 

Teaching Staff 142 



HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL 

AND THE 

HARVARD SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE 



Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Monday, 

Friday, 

Monday, 



Friday, 

Monday, 

Thursday, 

Saturday, 

Thursday, 

Monday, 

Friday, 



December 22, 1950- 
January 3, 1951 
Monday, January 29 



Thursday, 
Thursday, 
Monday, 

April 8-1 5 
Saturday, 

April 15-22 
Thursday, 
May 28-June 2 



CALENDAR 

Academic Calendar for 1 950-1 951 
June 5 Summer courses begin for fourth year class. 

July 4 Independence Day: a holiday. 

September 4 Labor Day: a holiday. 
September 22 Registration of Class of 1954. 
September 2$ Registration of second and third year classes. 
Academic Year begins for first, second and 
third year classes. 
September 29 Registration of fourth year class. 
October 2 Academic Year begins for fourth year class. 
October 12 Columbus Day: a holiday. 
'November 11 Armistice Day: a holiday. 
November 23 Thanksgiving Day: a holiday. 
December 1 1 Second Trimester begins for third year class. 
December 1$ Last day for filing applications for Scholarships 
for 1951— 1952. 
RECESS for first, second and third year 

classes. 
Second half year begins for first and second 

year classes. 
Washington's Birthday: a holiday. 
Third Trimester begins for third year class. 
Last day for filing applications for the degree 

of M.D. in June 195 1. 
RECESS for second year class. 
Class of 1955 — last day for filing applications 

for Scholarships for 1951-1952. 
RECESS for first and third year classes. 
Patriot's Day: a holiday. 
Examination Period. 



February 22 
March 8 
April 2 



April 14 



April 19 



CALENDAR 



Memorial Day: a holiday. 
Commencement. 



Wednesday, May 30 
Thursday, June 21 

Summer Vacation from June 3 through September 23, 1951 



Monday, 

Wednesday, 

Monday, 

Friday, 

Monday, 



Friday, 

Monday, 

Friday, 

Monday, 

Thursday, 

Monday, 

Saturday, 



Academic Calendar for 1951-1952 
June 4, Summer courses begin for fourth year class. 

July 4, Independence Day: a holiday. 

September 3, Labor Day: a holiday. 
September 21, Registration of Class of 1955. 
September 24, Registration of second and third year classes. 
Academic Year begins for first, second and 

third year classes. 
September 28, Registration of fourth year class. 
October 1, Academic Year begins for fourth year class. 
October 12, Columbus Day: a holiday. 
November 12, Armistice Day: a holiday. 
November 22, Thanksgiving Day: a holiday. 
December 10, Second Trimester begins for third year class. 
December 75, Last day for filing applications for Scholarship 

for 1952-1953. 



December 23, 1951- 
January 6, 19 5 2 



Monday, 

Friday, 

Monday, 

Tuesday, 

April 6-13 
April 13-20 
Tuesday, 



January 28, 

February 22, 
March 10, 
April 1, 



April zy, 



Saturday, April 19, 
Friday, May 30, 

May 31 -June 6 
Thursday, June 19, 



RECESS for first, second and third year classes. 

Second half year begins for first and second 
year classes. 

Washington's Birthday: a holiday. 

Third Trimester begins for third year class. 

Last day for receiving applications of candi- 
dates for the degree of A4.D. in June 1952. 

RECESS for second year class. 

RECESS for first and third year classes. 

Class of 1956 — last day for filing applications 
for Scholarships for 1952-195 3. 

Patriot's Day: a holiday. 

Memorial Day: a holiday. 

Examination Period. 

Commencement. 



Summer Vacation from June 6 through September 21, 1952. 



THE PRESIDENT AND FELLOWS OF 
HARVARD COLLEGE 

This Board is commonly known as the Corporation 
PRESIDENT 

JAMES BRYANT CONANT, A.B., Ph.D., LL.D., S.D. (hon.), L.H.D., 
D.C.L., D.Sc. (hon.), Dr. (Hon.), Litt.D. 

FELLOWS 

HENRY LEE SHATTUCK, A.B., LL.B., LL.D. 

ROGER IRVING LEE, A.B., M.D. 

CHARLES ALLERTON COOLIDGE, A.B, LL.B. 

WILLIAM LUKE MARBURY, A.B., LL.B. 

R. KEITH KANE, A.B., LL.B. 

TREASURER 

PAUL CODMAN CABOT, A.B, M.B.A. 



SECRETARY TO THE CORPORATION 

DAVID WASHBURN BAILEY, A.B. 



THE BOARD OF OVERSEERS 



The President and the Treasurer of the University, ex officio, and the 
following persons by election: — 

1951* 

EDWARD WALDO FORBES, A.B., A.M., Art.D., LL.D. 

WILLIAM McNEAR RAND, A.B., LL.D. 

CHARLES MOORFIELD STOREY, A.B., A.M., LL.B. 

THOMAS STILWELL LAMONT, A.B. 

EDWARD AUGUSTUS WEEKS, Jr., S.B., Litt.D., L.H.D., LL.D. 

1952 

EDWARD BELL KRUMBHAAR, A.B., M.D., Ph.D. 

ROGER ADAMS, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., S.D. 

HANFORD MacNIDER, A.B., M.M.S., LL.D. 

HENRY WADSWORTH CLARK, A.B., A.M. 

WILLIAM GURDON SALTONSTALL, A.B., A.M., L.H.D. 

1953 

GEORGE WHITNEY, A.B. 

GEORGE PARKMAN DENNY, A.B., M.D. 

CLARENCE BELDEN RANDALL, A.B., LL.B., D.Eng., LL.D. 

ROBERT ELLSWORTH GROSS, A.B. 

AAIORY HOUGHTON, A.B., LL.D. 

1954 

LAIRD BELL, A.B., J.D. 

SINCLAIR WEEKS, A.B, LL.D. 

JACK ISIDOR STRAUS, A.B. 

JOHN NICHOLAS BROWN, A.B, A.M., LL.D. 

JAMES LAWRENCE POOL, A.B, M.D, D.M.S. 

1955 

WILLIAM APPLETON LAWRENCE, A.B, B.D, D.D, S.T.D, L.H.D. 
ROBERT FISKE BRADFORD, A.B, LL.B, LL.D, L.H.D. 
JOHN MASON BROWN, A.B, L.H.D, Litt.D. 
J. ROBERT OPPENHEIMER, A.B, S.D, Dr.Phil. 
WILLIAM BARRY WOOD, Jr., A.B, M.D. 

* The term expires, in each case, on Commencement Day of the year indicated. 



BOARD OF <>\ ERSEERS 

1956 

FREDERICK LEWIS ALLEN, A.B., A.M., Litt.D. 
HARRISON TWEED, A.B., LL.B. 
CHRISTIAN ARCHIBALD HERTER, A.B., LL.D. 
ROBERT CUTLER, A.B., LL.B., LL.D. 
WILLIAM LINDSEY WHITE, A.B. 



SECRETARY OF THE BOARD OF OVERSEERS 

DAVID WASHBURN BAILEY, A.B. 25 Massachusetts Hall, Cambridge 



IO ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS OF THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 
AND SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE 

President: James B. Conant, a.b., ph.d., ll.d., s.d. (hon.), l.h.d., d.c.l., d.sc. 
(hon.), dr. (hon.), litt.d. 
Office, i Massachusetts Hall, Cambridge. 

Dean: George Packer Berry, m.d., ll.d., s.d. (hon.) 
Office, Administration Building, Medical School. 

Associate Dean and Dean of the School of Dental Medicine: James M. Dun- 
ning, D.D.S., M.P.H. 

Office, Administration Building, Medical School. 
Assistant Dean: Reginald Fitz, m.d., s.d., ll.d. 

Office, Administration Building, Medical School. 
Assistant Dean in Charge of Courses for Graduates: Eugene C. Eppinger, 

M.D. 

Office, Administration Building, Medical School. 
Business Manager in the Medical Area: Charles W. Greenough, a.b. 

Office, Administration Building, Medical School. 
Assistant to the Dean: Lester Grant, a.b. 

Office, Administration Building, Medical School. 
Executive Secretary, Committee on Research and Development in Medicine 

and Health: Henry Coe Meadow, s.b. 

Office, Administration Building, Medical School. 
Chairman of the Division of Medical Sciences of the Faculty of Arts and 

Sciences: Eugene Markley Landis, m.d., ph.d., s.m. (hon.). 
Physician to Students: Lewis Tillman McDaniel, m.d. 

Office hours, daily, except Saturdays and holidays, 8.15 to 9 a.m., and 4 
to 5.30 p.m., Vanderbilt Hall, 251 Longwood Avenue. Telephone, 
Longwood 6-2380. 

Alumni Office, Room 109, Administration Building, Medical School. 

The Bursar's Office is in Lehman Hall, Cambridge. It is open on all busi- 
ness days from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., except Saturdays, for the receipt of fees, 
payments, and other financial business. 

ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD OF THE MEDICAL SCHOOL AND 
SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE 

1 950-1 95 1 

President: JAMES B. CONANT, A.B., Ph.D., LL.D., S.D. (hon.), L.H.D., 

D.C.L., D.Sc. (hon.), Dr. (hon.), Litt.D. (ex officio). 
Dean: GEORGE P. BERRY, M.D., LL.D., S.D. (hon.), Chairman. 



ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD II 

JAMES M. DUNNING, D.D.S., M.P.H., Associate Dean and Dean of 

the School of Dental Medicine. 
REGINALD FITZ, M.D., S.D. (hon.), LL.D., Assistant Dean and Lecturer 

on the History of Medicine. 
HERRMAN L. BLUMGART, M.D, Professor of Medicine. 
MAXWELL FINLAND, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
CHESTER N. FRAZIER, M.D., Dr.P.H, Edward Wigglesworth Professor 

of Dermatology. 
ROBERT E. GROSS, M.D., William E. Ladd Professor of Child Surgery. 
A. BAIRD HASTINGS, Ph.D., S.D. (hon.), Hamilton Kuhn Professor of 

Biological Chemistry. 
OTTO KRAYER, M.D., Associate Professor of Comparative Pharmacol- 
ogy. 
JAMES H. MEANS, M.D, Jackson Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
FRANCIS D. MOORE, M.D., Moseley Professor of Surgery. 
DUNCAN E. REID, M.D, William Lambert Richardson Professor of 

Obstetrics. 
DAVID D. RUTSTEIN, M.D, Professor of Preventive Medicine. 
MARCUS SINGER, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 
CHARLES M. WALDO, D.D.S, Associate Professor of Orthodontics. 
SHIELDS WARREN, M.D, Professor of Pathology at the New England 

Deaconess Hospital. 



HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL 
BOSTON 

HISTORY AND ORGANIZATION 

The Harvard Medical School started as a branch of the University in 
1782, when three professorships of medicine were established. The first 
degrees, Bachelor of Medicine, were conferred in 1788. Until 181 1 the 
degrees of Bachelor of Medicine and Doctor of Medicine were conferred, 
the former on graduation from the Medical School, the latter on examination 
at least seven years after graduation. In 181 1 the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine was granted to graduates of that year and to earlier graduates who 
had not been admitted to it, and all graduates since 181 1 have received this 
degree. From 191 1 to 192 1, inclusive, the degree of Doctor of Public Health 
was conferred for graduate work. Since 1921 the degrees of Bachelor of 
Public Health, Master of Public Health and Doctor of Public Health have 
been conferred under the School of Public Health. 

When the Medical School opened, the first lectures were given in the 
buildings of the College, Harvard Hall and Holden Chapel. The School 
moved to Boston in 1810, in order to be close to whatever hospital facilities 
might develop in a large and growing city, and has remained there since. In 
1 81 6 the first Medical School building was erected. From 1882 until 1906 
the School occupied the building at the corner of Boylston and Exeter 
Streets now used by Boston University. In September 1906, the School 
moved into its present buildings on Longwood Avenue and Shattuck Street. 
They are five in number and with their surrounding grounds occupy eleven 
acres. One of these is designed for administration and four for housing the 
laboratory departments, and for laboratory and clinical instruction. 

Previous to 1906, the major part of the clinical teaching was carried on in 
the Massachusetts General and Boston City Hospitals. Since that date, how- 
ever, there has grown up in the neighborhood of the Medical School, and 
become affiliated with it, a group of hospitals which are used for clinical 
teaching and investigation, in addition to the clinical facilities previously at 
the School's disposal. Clinical advantages from the student viewpoint are 
not a matter of large hospitals only, but rather are related to the number of 
patients in these hospitals who are under the care of instructors on the staff 
of the Medical School and available for teaching purposes. Harvard Medi- 
cal School students are offered an unrivaled opportunity to secure a well- 
organized clinical experience and knowledge of disease. Each student comes 
into intimate contact, under supervision, with patients in these hospitals, 
beginning in the second half of the second year and increasing until the 



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HOSPITAL FACILITIES I 3 

fourth year, when the students serve as clinical clerks and give their whole 
time to the study of patients. 

BUILDINGS 

The Administration Building (A), with over 40,000 square feet of floor 
space, contains the Faculty Room, the Deans' Offices of the Medical School 
and School of Dental Medicine, the Alumni Office, the Courses for Gradu- 
ates Office, the Business Office, the joint library of the Medical School and 
the School of Public Health, and the Warren Museum. 

The laboratory buildings, designated by the letters B, C, D, and E, are all 
constructed on the same general plan. Each consists of two parallel wings 
united at the front by an amphitheatre with a seating capacity of two hun- 
dred and fifty. Both the smaller rooms and the laboratories are designed on 
a unit system which greatly simplifies the changes required in making these 
suited to the needs of departments whose methods of teaching have changed 
since the rooms were originally designed. 

The amount of floor space varies considerably in each of the four build- 
ings, but the design is such that this variation is not apparent from the main 
quadrangle. 

Building B accommodates the Department of Anatomy, Histology, and 
Embryology. The wings each have three floors and a total floor space of 
over 52,000 square feet. 

Building C provides space for the Departments of Physiology, Physical 
Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Experimental Surgery. In this building each 
wing has four floors and a total floor space of 62,000 square feet. 

Building D is occupied by the Departments of Bacteriology, Biophysics, 
Pathology, Preventive Medicine and also laboratories of the Department 
of Medicine. In this building there are five floors in one wing and three 
floors in the other, with a total floor space of over 48,000 square feet. 
There are animal houses between Buildings B and D and between Buildings 
C and E. 

Building E houses Pharmacology, Legal Medicine, and Comparative 
Pathology and Tropical Medicine. There are three floors in one wing and 
four floors in the other, with a floor space of 35,000 square feet. 

An airplane view of the buildings and their position is shown on facing 
page. 

The clinical departments are housed in the various hospitals associated 
with the School. Vanderbilt Hall (F), the dormitory for male medical 
students, is immediately adjacent to the Medical School buildings. 

HOSPITAL FACILITIES 

The Massachusetts General Hospital. — This is a general hospital founded 
in 181 1 and ever since associated with the Medical School. There are serv- 



14 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

ices in medicine, surgery, pediatrics, dermatology, genito-urinary diseases, 
orthopaedics, gynaecology, neurology, neurosurgery, anaesthesia and psy- 
chiatry, all of which are used in giving instruction in these special depart- 
ments of medicine. The hospital has 964 beds, 452 of them being available 
for teaching purposes. In the General Hospital 7,189 patients were ad- 
mitted in 1949. Large out-patient departments are also used for instruction 
in the above clinical subjects. New patients were admitted to the out- 
patient department last year for a total of 193,933 visits. 14,683 patients were 
treated in the emergency ward. Laboratories for pathology, chemistry, 
metabolism, medical and surgical research, and x-ray are maintained, and 
there is an excellent medical library, all of which are open to students in 
the Medical School. 

In 1942 arrangements were made with the Vincent Memorial Hospital 
and the Hall-Mercer Hospital to care for their patients in the Massachusetts 
General Hospital. 

In 1943 the Collis P. Huntington Hospital and its associated laboratories 
of the Harvard Cancer Commission were transferred from their former lo- 
cation adjacent to the Medical School to the buildings of the Massachusetts 
General Hospital. 

The Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. — There are 198 beds in this 
hospital, most of which are used for instruction in diseases of the eye, ear, 
nose and throat. In 1949, 6,145 patients were admitted to the hospital and 
there were 72,405 out-patient visits. The hospital maintains pathological 
and x-ray laboratories. 

The Boston City Hospital. — This hospital with all its divisions contains 
2,535 beds, including 159 bassinets for newborn and 217 cribs for children. 
Of these beds 1,619 are in the main hospital. Over 200 are available to the 
teaching units of the Medical School. The Second and Fourth Medical 
Services and the Neurological and Radiological Services are under the direc- 
tion of Professors of the Harvard Medical School, and in addition there are 
other specialties open to our students. In the Out-Patient Department and 
i\ccident Floor 68,874 patients applied for diagnosis and treatment during 
the year 1950. 

The Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, established in 1923 for medical re- 
search, includes a metabolism ward and is an integral part of the Harvard 
Medical Unit. The Departments of Neurology and of Pathology also main- 
tain active research laboratories. A department for surgical research has 
been in operation since 1930. In addition there are well-equipped service 
laboratories for pathology, chemistry, metabolism, and immunology. Three 
amphitheatres and various conference rooms are used in student instruction. 
The hospital maintains an admirable general working library and two special 
libraries. 



nosi'i I \i. I u.iu I lis 15 

The Peter Bent Brigham Hospital. — This hospital has been closely asso- 
ciated with the Medical School since its dedication in 191 }. Ir is for general 
medical and surgical cases, and is situated on grounds adjacent to the 
Medical School buildings. The chiefs of services are professors of the 
Faculty of the Medical School. There are 275 beds, nil of which are used 
for teaching purposes. During the past vcar, 5,009 patients were admitted. 
There is also maintained an out-patient service for ambulatory medical and 
surgical patients. The total number of visits was 52,359. There are well- 
equipped medical, surgical, and pathological laboratories. The hospital, by 
special arrangement, makes use of the library of the Medical School. 

The Beth Israel Hospital. — This is a general hospital with a capacity of 
362 beds (including 30 pediatric, 68 obstetrical beds, and 91 bassinets), 150 of 
which are available for teaching. The institution is located on Brooklinc 
Avenue around the corner from the Harvard Medical School. The hos- 
pital is equipped for teaching and research, having laboratories for research 
in surgery, medicine, and pathology, each under the direction of a full-time 
physician who is associated with the Faculty of the Harvard Medical School. 
There are also electrocardiograph and basal-metabolism laboratories, animal 
research equipment, and an extensive x-ray department. 6,868 patients were 
admitted to the hospital last year. There were 59,703 visits made to the 
out-patient department. 

The Children s Medical Center. — A grouping of several institutions con- 
cerned with the care of the younger age group. These are as follows: 

The Children's Hospital. — Located on Longwood Avenue adjacent to 
the Medical School. A general hospital for care of the younger age group. 
Maintains medical, surgical, neurosurgical, orthopedic, dental, radiologic 
and pathologic services with their associated specialities. There are 424 beds, 
of which 369 are available for teaching. During the year 1950, there were 
10,068 cases treated as bed patients and 59,635 visits were made to the Out- 
Patient Department. Full laboratory and diagnostic services are provided 
for the study of material from the house and out-patient services. 

The Sharon Sanatorium. — This Charitable organization sponsors the 
Sharon Cardiovascular Unit composed of 24 beds devoted to the care of 
non-rheumatic cardiovascular disorders including congenital heart disease. 
It is included in Children's Hospital as described above. 

The Infants' Hospital. — Thomas Morgan Rotch, Jr. Memorial Hospi- 
tal for Infants. — This hospital is closely related to the Children's Hospital. 
There are 54 beds which are devoted to the care of infants in addition to 
a separate nursery accommodating 15 premature infants. 1,310 patients were 
treated during the year 1950. All cases in this hospital are available for 
teaching purposes. 



1 6 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

The House of the Good Samaritan. — Situated at 25 Binney Street 
adjacent to the Medical School. There are 79 beds devoted to the care and 
study of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease. 179 patients were 
admitted in 1950. There is a research department for the study of rheu- 
matic fever and rheumatic heart disease. All beds are available for teaching 
purposes. 

The Hospital and Convalescent Home for Children. — This unit, situ- 
ated in Wellesley Hills, operates as an adjunct to the facilities for care of 
acute cases at 300 Longwood Avenue and vicinity. It provides 75 beds in- 
cluding 12 beds for care of long-term respiratory paralysis. During 1950, it 
rendered 12,641 days of care to 240 admissions. All cases are available for 
teaching purposes. 

The Children's Mission to Children. — A social service organization, 
cooperating in home care and placement programs for children affected by 
illness and in need of such service. 

The Children's Cancer Research Foundation. — An independent insti- 
tution working with its staff and facilities integrated with those of the Chil- 
dren's Medical Center, provides in conjunction with its research program 
care and treatment to children with disseminated cancer. This program for 
care and study of 100 patients is available for teaching purposes. 

The Boston Lying-in Hospital. — This hospital occupies a building com- 
pleted in 1922 at 221 Longwood Avenue. There are 255 beds, most of 
which are used for teaching. During the past year there were 6,869 adult 
admissions to the hospital, of whom 5,361 were delivered. Chemical, patho- 
logical, bacteriological and blood bank laboratories, and a well-equipped 
x-ray department are available for research. 

The Free Hospital for Women. — This hospital is devoted exclusively to 
the surgical treatment of diseases peculiar to women. It has 91 beds, of 
which 46 are available for teaching. There were 2,762 patients operated on 
in 1949. In the out-patient department about 13,525 patients were seen in 
1949, of whom 2,276 were new. In addition to standard laboratory facilities 
and a library, it has a laboratory for research in fertility and the Fearing 
Research Laboratory. 

Boston Psychopathic Hospital. — This is a state institution for acute, cur- 
able, incipient, and doubtful cases of mental disease. The hospital was 
opened to patients in June, 191 2. It has 117 beds, all of which are available 
for teaching, and receives patients at the rate of about 1,228 a year. The 
hospital is equipped with psychological and biochemical laboratories. The 
out-patient department receives new patients at the rate of about 1,300 a 
year. In addition to the psychoses and neuroses, the clinical material in- 



school OF Di N l \I. MEDICINE 17 

eludes eases of maladjustment, personality problems, behavior disorders of 

childhood arid mental defeet. 

McLean Hospital. -This hospital is a depart m ent of the Massachusetts 
General Hospital for the eare and treatment of patients with nervous or 
mental disorders. McLean Hospital was the first hospital in New England. 
It has a capacity of 232 beds and has been a teaching hospital connected 
with the I [arvard Medical School for many years. It is well equipped with 
laboratories for both routine and research work. 

New England Deaconess Hospital. — This hospital contains 300 beds and 
includes the Deaconess General, the George F. Baker Clinic, and the Palmer 
Memorial Unit. The George F. Baker Clinic is especially equipped for dia- 
betics and study of the disease. The Palmer Memorial is devoted to cancer 
and chronic disease; it owns two grams of radium, a large emanation plant, 
a 4,000,000 volt x-ray therapy machine, and maintains effective social serv- 
ice, and out-patient departments. 

HOSPITAL APPOINTMENTS 

An active service is maintained to aid graduates in securing suitable hospi- 
tal appointments as interns. Boston hospitals affiliated with the School 
make about one hundred such appointments each year. Internships for the 
Class of 1950 are listed in the back of the catalogue. 

SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE 

The Harvard School of Dental Medicine admitted its first students in the 
academic year 1941-42. This School, which succeeds the Harvard Dental 
School, offers a four-year course leading to the degree D.M.D. 

The requirements for admission are identical with those of the Medical 
School. Qualified students and graduates of approved medical schools who 
wish to specialize in dentistry may be admitted to the School of Dental 
Medicine with advanced standing. 

During the first two academic years the courses of instruction are identi- 
cal with those of the Medical School. The third and fourth years are under 
the direct supervision of the staff of the School of Dental Medicine. This 
course is intended to provide a thorough training in dental skills and 
procedure in keeping with legal safeguards established by State Boards of 
Licensure and sufficient to permit entry into the practice of general 
dentistry. 

Access to the research laboratories of the School in the elective time 
during the fourth vear permits unusual training for those having dental 
research in mind as a career. 



1 8 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 



LIBRARIES 



The joint library of the Medical School and the School of Public Health 
is on the second floor of the Administration Building, and in the other 
buildings are branch libraries. This library is open from 9 a.m. until 10 p.m., 
on Saturdays from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m., and on Sundays from 2 p.m. until 
6 p.m. The present number of volumes in the library is 98,619 and in addi- 
tion there are 205,392 pamphlets and 902 current periodicals on file. 

The School of Dental Medicine Library, at 188 Longwood Avenue, has 
about 4,187 bound volumes, 1,555 pamphlets and 6$ current periodicals. 

The George Burgess Magrath Library of Legal Medicine contains a 
collection of approximately 3,000 bound volumes, 384 pamphlets, and 18 
current periodical titles. It is located on the third floor of Building E. 

The Lucien Howe Library of Ophthalmology, at the Massachusetts Eye 
and Ear Infirmary, has 3,607 bound volumes, 2,616 pamphlets, and 37 
current periodicals. 

The College Library at Cambridge is open to the students of this School. 

The Boston Public Library is open to students who are residents of 
Boston. Students, not residents of Boston, who have filed a bond at the 
Bursar's office, may also use this library. The Bursar will furnish on applica- 
tion the necessary certificate of bond. 

The Boston Medical Library, No. 8 The Fenway, contains on file about 
200,405 bound volumes, 140,128 pamphlets, and approximately 723 current 
periodicals. This very valuable library is open to those who desire to con- 
sult medical literature, on week days from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and on Monday 
and Thursday to 9 p.m., Saturday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 

The librarian of the Medical School and the School of Public Health 
Library is Miss Anna C. Holt whose office is in Building A. Through her, 
contact with the other libraries mentioned is maintained. Dr. Reginald Fitz 
is Chairman of the Library Committee. 

WARREN ANATOMICAL MUSEUM 

The Warren Anatomical Museum was founded in 1847 by John Collins 
Warren, of the College Class of 1797, Adjunct Professor of Anatomy and 
Surgery from 1809 to 181 5, Hersey Professor of Anatomy and Surgery from 
1 81 5 to 1847, Professor Emeritus from 1847 to his death in 1856, son of John 
Warren, the first Hersey Professor of Anatomy and Surgery. During the 
academic year the Museum will be opened to visitors and students in the 
School by appointment only, on application to the Department of Pathology. 

The collection has over twenty thousand specimens, illustrating both nor- 
mal and pathological anatomy. Students and graduates may have access to 
these specimens. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR admission' io 

Besides dissections and serial sections of bones, die anatomical coll 
includes many injections, corrosion preparations, models and groups of 
bones, notably the Dwight collection of spines, hands and feet, and the 
Tcllo collection of skulls. A section of neuropathology is growing largei 
and is suitable for teaching. There lias been added a very valuable series of 
total brain sections which show major lesions. These are displayed over 
illuminated boxes. 

The pathological collection of "hand"' specimens, conveniently housed in 
40-gallon tanks, is for the use of students, and mounted specimens illustrate 
the majoi diseases. 

1 here is a collection of medico-legal material which has a section to itself 
and forms a basis for teaching. 

The American Ambulance of Paris contributed a number of specimens 
from the European War, especially interesting for a student of military 
surgery. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Candidates for admission to the first year class must present evidence 
satisfactory to the Committee on Admission, not simplv that they have 
passed the courses necessary to fulfill the requirements, but also that their 
college work and other credentials have been of such character as to give 
promise of work of high quality in the medical course. Students who 
satisfy the Committee in other respects will be admitted on the basis of 
only two years of college work, but three or four years are strongly 
recommended. 

In general, the Schools consider for admission to their classes male and 
female students in good standing in arts or in sciences in colleges approved 
by the Council on Medical Education and Hospitals of the American .Medi- 
cal Association. A list of these schools may be obtained by writing direct 
to the Higher Education Directorv, Office of Education, Washington 25, 
D. C. (Colleges of pharmacy, optometry, veterinary medicine, agriculture, 
as well as junior colleges and evening and universitv extension courses are 
not included in the approved list. Therefore, credits earned in such institu- 
tions are not acceptable to the Committee.) Credentials from foreign 
universities, in most cases, must be supplemented bv two years of work 
in an American university. Admission cannot be assured as the classes of 
the Medical School and the School of Dental Medicine are limited by 
Faculty rule to no students in the Medical School and 15 students in the 
School of Dental Medicine. Applications will not be received from candi- 
dates who have been refused admission on two prior occasions. 

In order to meet the present legal requirements of state licensing boards 



2 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

and to have the needed basic understanding, the following specific college 
credits must be secured: 

Biology: The student should take a general course in biology which should 
emphasize the structure, function, natural history, and evolution of plants 
and animals. A course in embryology is distinctly recommended but 
bacteriology, human anatomy, and histology will not be considered as meet- 
ing the biology requirements. A satisfactory course should show college 
credits of at least eight semester hours. 

Chemistry: The student should acquire a sound understanding of the basic 
principles of chemistry, both inorganic and organic. He must have taken 
not less than 16 semester hours of chemistry, which should be about equally 
divided between inorganic and organic chemistry. Biochemistry will not be 
accepted as meeting these requirements. 

To be prepared adequately for the work in chemistry in the Medical 
School it is desirable that the student have had experience with the applica- 
tion of chemical laws to gases and solutions, and some experience with 
quantitative techniques (particularly volumetric analysis). 
Physics: The student should acquire an understanding of the general prin- 
ciples of physical laws and phenomena, and have experience in mechanics, 
heat, light, sound, and electricity. College credit for eight semester hours 
should be secured. 

The above science courses must be accompanied by laboratory work 
taken as a part of the college course. 

English: The student must have facility in the use of English in speech and 
composition. A one year course in which composition is included is accept- 
able but two years of college English are recommended. If in the judgment 
of the authorities of the applicant's college, he has obtained enough training 
in secondary school to be exempted from the usual beginning course in 
English, an advanced course in English is strongly recommended. 
Modern Language: The student should have a reading knowledge of a 
modern language important to medicine in addition to English. A reading 
knowledge pre -supposes two years of high school and one year of college 
work, or two years of college work. The Committee on Admission suggests 
French, German, Spanish, or Russian as suitable languages. If in the judg- 
ment of the authorities of the applicant's college, he has obtained enough 
training in secondary school to be exempted from the usual beginning 
course in a college foreign language or to have achieved a reading knowl- 
edge of that language, an advanced course in the same foreign language is 
strongly recommended. 

The Medical College Admission Test of the Association of American 
Medical Colleges is required. Information about this test may be obtained 



Admission TO ADVANCED STANDING 21 

by writing to the Educational Testing Service, Box joi, Princeton, N 

Jersey. 

Interview: An interview may be required of any applicant. The Committee 

00 Admission will inform an applicant it" one is necessary in his ease. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING IN THE 
HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL 

The third year class is automatically increased by approximately 15, mak- 
ing place for transfer students from other medical schools. Vacancies in 

the second year class may also be filled by transferring students. 

Students of high scholastic standing will be considered. They must be 
vouched for as promising men by the Dean of the school from which they 
come and must furnish a certificate of time spent in medical studies at least 
equal to that spent by the class to which they seek admission, lull credit for 
work done elsewhere will be allowed as a rule, but in certain cases addi- 
tional work, especially in physical diagnosis, may be required. Ordinarily 
such requirements can be completed during the summer holiday preceding 
transfer. All the requirements for the first year class (including the Med- 
ical College Admission Test), must have been fulfilled by applicants for 
advanced standing. 

Applications may be obtained at the Admissions Office approximately one 
year prior to the expected date of transfer. 

Admission of graduates from the .Medical School to the thin! vear at the 
Harvard School of Dental Medicine, or from the Harvard School of Dental 
Medicine to the third year at the Harvard Medical School, will be decided 
by a special Committee on Continued Professional Study in Medicine and 
Dentistry. 

Students seeking transfer to advanced standing from foreign medical 
schools will be required to take Part I of the examinations given by the 
National Board of Medical Examiners. It is necessary also for such students 
to be recommended by the Approving Authority of the Board of Educa- 
tion of the State of Massachusetts since the laws of this state do not permit 
the granting of the M.D. degree to students who have not fulfilled all the 
requirements for this degree in medical schools in the United States without 
such approval. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING IN THE 
HARVARD SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE 

A student who has begun his medical studies in an approved medical 
school may be admitted to the second or third year and become a candi- 



2 2 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

date for the degree of Doctor of Dental Medicine under the following 
conditions: 

He must be vouched for as a promising man by the Dean of the medical 

school from which he applies. 

He must furnish a certificate of time spent in medical study at least 

equal to that spent by the class to which he seeks admission. 

All the requirements for the first year class must have been fulfilled by 

applicants for advanced standing. 
The Committee on Admission will decide in each case whether examina- 
tion in the various subjects shall be required. 

Information for Servicemen 

The qualifications for admission remain essentially the same for veterans 
as for civilian applicants. Before the acceptance of a veteran can become 
final, the applicant will need to submit photostatic copies of discharge 
papers or similar evidence of honorable release. Where available the appli- 
cant should file also a copy of his "Separation and Qualification Record" on 
which is listed in detail his service record and training. If the Committee 
does not act favorably on an application, certifications furnished by the ap- 
plicant may be returned, at his request. It is the responsibility of the appli- 
cant to take the necessary steps toward obtaining government benefits for 
servicemen eligible for them under Public Laws 16 ("Rehabilitation") or 
346 ("G.I. Bill"). On request the Counsellor for Veterans can furnish a 
brief statement of the necessary procedures required by the Veterans Ad- 
ministration to receive such benefits. The University has established the 
Office of Counsellor for Veterans to form a central point for answering in- 
quiries and advising veterans. For matters relating to veterans' affairs and 
not connected directly with the Medical School or the School of Dental 
Medicine, the applicant should feel free to write to the Counsellor for 
Veterans, Lehman Hall, Cambridge 38, Massachusetts. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

In order that the time of study shall count as a full year, students of all 
upper classes must register on the first day of the session. 

A fee of $10 is charged for late registration. 

For special and approved purposes fourth year students may be allowed to 
take a portion of their work elsewhere than at the Harvard Medical School, 
provided the application be approved by the Dean in consultation with the 
Administrative Board and the head of the department concerned, and pro- 
vided the student passes an examination oil this work after its completion, 
conducted by a member of the Faculty of the Harvard Medical School. 



(,i \l R \i. R] GULA1 tONS : | 

I \ wiin \uo\s ami PROMO! 

Promotion from one class to another is contingent upon the sattsi 
completioii of the required work of each year. In each course, when indi- 
cated, students will be informed by their instructors as early as possible 
when the progress of their work is unsatisfactory. At the end of each year 
each student may be informed whether he ranks in the top, middle, or lowest 

third of his class. I his information will be given out only l>v the Dean or 
Assistant Dean. 

Final grades in each course will be based Upon such examinations or other 
tests as are determined l>v each department. Grading is on the scale of A. 
B, C, D, and I" (denoting failure). 

Grades are averaged on the basis that A. = i, B = 2, C = 3, D 5 and 
E = 8, and since the time devoted to courses varies, grade averages will take 
into account the time assigned to courses, giving them computation values 
as follows: 

First Year: Anatomy 5; Histology 5; Physiology 5; Biological Chemistry j. 

Second Year: Pathology 6; Bacteriology 4; Pharmacology 4: Physical 
Diagnosis 2; Laboratory Diagnosis 2; Surgerv 2. 

Third Year: Medicine 6; Surgerv 6; Pediatrics 3; Obstetrics 3; Preventive 
Medicine 2. 

Fourth Year: Proportional to month's work. 

Promotion Boards: 

Promotion Boards have been appointed for the first, second and third years 
to review the work of each student at the end of the year or, at their option, 
at other times. The membership of these boards consists of one representa- 
tive from each department whose grading, as noted above, affects the stu- 
dent's grade average and one member from the Committee on Examinations 
and not as voting members, the Dean or Assistant Dean, ex-officiis, and on 
the Promotion Boards of the first and second years, the Dean of the School 
of Dental Medicine, ex-ofjicio. 

It is the duty of the Promotion Boards to promote those qualified, to 
notify formally students whose work in any course is unsatisfactory — in 
certain cases requiring that such students repeat the year's work — and to 
recommend that unpromising students withdraw from the School. 

Opportunity will be given to students to appeal the decision of a Promotion 
Board either at a special meeting or at the next regular meeting of the 
Board. Appeals must be sent to the Chairman of the Promotion Board, Har- 
vard Medical School and, to be valid, be received by him within two weeks 
after the issuance of a Promotion Board's notice of formal action. 



24 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

General Examination: 

A committee will give a General Examination to each candidate for the 
degree of M.D. It will recommend to the Faculty those who pass and are 
otherwise qualified for the degree and for honors. The conditions under 
which a student shall take a General Examination and the character and 
content of the examination will be determined by the Committee subject 
onlv to rules of the Faculty. 

A student becomes eligible to take a General Examination on successfully 
completing seven-eighths of his fourth year work. He may not anticipate 
the General Examination ahead of his class. 

A student who fails three General Examinations is debarred from further 
attempts. 

Rules governing promotion: 

i. A student with a grade averaging, for one year, from D (5) to E 
(8) will ordinarily be required to withdraw from the School. 

2. A student whose grade for one year averages from 4 to 5 will be 
warned that his work is unsatisfactory. At the Promotion Board's discretion 
such a student may be required to repeat the year's work, or to withdraw 
from the School. 

3. A student who is set back a year must repeat at least two assigned sub- 
jects and then he will not be promoted unless he obtains a grade of C or 
better in both of these subjects. 

4. A student who is warned by a Promotion that his work is unsatisfac- 
torv and yet is permitted to advance with his class must attain for the 
ensuing year a grade average which is significantly better than in his previ- 
ous year, failing which he must repeat the year's work, or, at the Board's 
discretion, he may be required to withdraw from the School. 

5. A student failing in any course and yet permitted to advance with his 
class may not be promoted a second time nor will he be allowed to take the 
General Examination until that failure is removed. 

6. A student failing any course will have an opportunity for re-examina- 
tion only at a time set by the Promotion Board or with a succeeding class or 
section. 

Withdrawal from the School 

The Faculty reserves the right to require the withdrawal of any student 
at any time when, in the opinion of his instructors, it is manifest that he is 
incompetent, or for anv reason is unfit to continue his course. 

A student may withdraw voluntarily from the School upon application 
to an Assistant Dean. Application for reinstatement by any student must 



Di GR] l s 25 

be received in writing at least four months prior to tl 

and for favorable actum must be approved by the Committee on A Amission. 

After tWO years, favorable action rail Usually not be taken. 

DEGREES 
DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE 

Even candidate for the degree of Doctor of Medicine at this University 
must be at least twenty-one years of age, and of good moral character. I k 
must have fulfilled all the requirements for admission to tins \1< dical School; 
give evidence of having studied in a recognized medical school at least four 
full years, of which one year must be spent in the regular fourth year course 

of this School; have passed all the required examinations; have dissected the 
three parts of the body to the satisfaction of the demonstrator; have taken 
charge of and reported on twelve cases in Obstetrics under supervision and 
instruction; and furnish evidence of having engaged in the practical exercises 
in Medicine and Surgery. 

The degree of Doctor of Medicine cum laude, magna cunt laude, or 
summa cunt laude may be given to students of highest rating in the class, on 
recommendation of the Committe on Examinations and the Faculty. 

The degree of Doctor of Medicine cum laude, magna ami laude, or 
summa cum laude for a thesis in a special field may be awarded to candidates 
for the degree of Doctor of Medicine on recommendation of the Commit- 
tee on Examinations and the Faculty. The work for this may have been 
carried out under the Tutorial System or by independent arrangement 
with any member of the Staff. 

The degree is awarded for original and meritorious investigation in a 
single subject or group of subjects and for evidence of ability, scholarship 
and persistent interest and industry. Candidates wishing to be considered 
for such honors in a special field must apply to the Dean's Office not later 
than March 1 of the year of graduation and must submit two typewritten 
copies of an original thesis prepared in form usual for publication. The 
written approval of the head of the department in which the work was 
completed must be attached. 

The thesis should include an introduction with references to relevant 
literature; a brief statement of the purpose of the study; a description of 
the materials and methods employed; an account of the original observations 
included; a discussion of the results; a summary; and a list of the references 
used. 

No candidate is eligible to graduate with honors for a thesis in a special 
field unless he has done creditable work in his regular curricular studies 
and has passed the General Examinations. In addition, any candidate whose 



2 6 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

qualifications are acceptable for honors in a special field must pass an oral 
examination before the Subcommittee on Honors in a Special Field and 
invited special examiners in which he will be examined not only on the sub- 
ject of his thesis but on the general field of which it is a part. 

Every candidate for the degree of M.D. must make application for it in 
writing on blanks furnished at the Dean's office, on or before April i. 

HIGHER DEGREES IN THE MEDICAL SCIENCES 

The degrees Doctor of Philosophy, Master of Arts, and Doctor of Med- 
ical Sciences have been established for advanced work in some special field 
in the medical sciences. The first two degrees are administered by the Fac- 
ultv of Arts and Sciences, through the Division of Medical Sciences, which 
consists of faculty members of the preclinical departments of the Medical 
School. The third is administered by the Faculty of Medicine. All candi- 
dates for these degrees must hold a degree in Arts or in Sciences from an 
approved college. 

Candidates for the Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Arts degrees are 
registered in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences for study in the 
Division of Medical Sciences. Students interested in graduate study in the 
Division should see the General Announcement of the Graduate School of 
Arts and Sciences and the pamphlet entitled Higher Degrees in Medical 
Sciences. These can be obtained by men from the Harvard Graduate School, 
24 Quincy Street, Cambridge 38, Massachusetts; or by women from the 
RadclifTe Graduate School, RadclifTe College, Cambridge 38, Massachusetts. 

Inquiries should be addressed to the Chairman of the Division of A4edical 
Sciences, 25 Shattuck Street, Boston 15, Massachusetts. 

Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Arts 

The Division of Medical Sciences makes available to graduate students the 
facilities of the preclinical departments and research laboratories of the 
I [arvard .Medical School and its affiliated hospitals. The Division offers 
advanced courses and research in anatomy, bacteriology, biochemistry, bio- 
physics, pathology, pharmacology, and physiology. As part of the Faculty 
of Arts and Sciences, the Division also has close relations with the Depart- 
ments of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics, in Harvard College. Members 
of these departments participate in the training of graduate students in the 
Division. 

I he major aim of the Division of Medical Sciences is to prepare graduate 
students for careers of research and teaching in the basic medical sciences. 
Since the graduate student may elect a program of study suited to his indi- 
vidual requirements, lie may concentrate on his field of special interest early 



HIGHER DEGREES in Mil MEDICAL SCIENCES 27 

in his training, without the obligation of spending two <»r three additional 
years in clinical studies which arc required for the degree of Doctor ot 
Medicine. 
The graduate student in the Division devotes a major portion of his tune 

to original experimental investigation which he undertakes m conjunction 
with formal Courses designed as a preparation for his special field. During 
the period when he is taking formal courses, he ma) choose the type of 
problem which interests him most among the wide range ot research activ- 
ities of members of the Division. 

Candidates for admission should have a thorough grounding in the bio- 
logical and physical sciences. This will usually he more than the minimum 
for admission to medical school. Advanced courses in biology, chemistry, 
and physics are ordinarily regarded as preferable to undergraduate courses 
in bacteriology, biochemistry, histology, etc. A reading knowledge of (Jer- 
man and one other modern language is desirable but not required for 
admission. 

The minimum requirement for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy con- 
sists of not less than two years — at least one and a half of which must be 
in residence at Harvard or RadclifTe — devoted to advanced studies approved 
as suitable preparation for the degree by the proper department. Ordinarily 
three or more vcars are required for the completion of formal courses and 
preparation of a thesis. In estimating the amount of a candidate's study for 
the degree, the advanced work done in other graduate departments at Har- 
vard or of other universities will be considered. 

The candidate is required to pass an examination in German and one other 
modern language. These examinations must be taken before the oral Pre- 
liminarv Examination which is usually given during the second year of resi- 
dence. The Preliminary Examination is designed to bring out the candidate's 
ability to integrate his knowledge of his special field and two collateral 
subjects, and his familiaritv with the historv and literature of these fields. 

It is expected that the preparation of a thesis — which may be started 
upon successful completion of the Preliminary Examination — will require 
full time for usually not less than one and a half years. It must show 
original treatment of a fitting subject, give evidence of independent research, 
and be clearly, logically, and carefullv written in good English. Following 
acceptance of his thesis, the candidate is given an oral Final Examination 
on the subject of his thesis and its relation to his special field and collateral 
subjects. 

The minimum requirement for the degree of Master of Arts consists of 
a full year of residence and study. At least one quarter of the work must 
be more advanced than the regular introductory courses offered by the 



2 8 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

various departments, and should consist of research or individual prepara- 
tion for research. In addition, each student must pass an examination in 
French or German. In some departments a thesis is required for the degree. 

Doctor of Medical Sciences 

Candidates for this degree must matriculate as medical students and com- 
plete with an honor grade the regular elementary courses offered by this 
School, together with such other subjects as may be recommended by the 
Faculty. Ordinarily this preparatory training will be equivalent to the first 
two years of the course of study leading to the degree of M.D. In addition, 
all candidates are required to have a reading knowledge of French and Ger- 
man. In estimating the amount of a candidate's study for the degree, study 
completed in other approved medical schools will be considered. 

Following the completion of this preliminary training, the student shall 
devote himself for not less than two years to the intensive study of one of 
the fundamental medical sciences and to the preparation of a thesis. The 
thesis must show an original treatment of a fitting subject and give evidence 
of independent research. 

There shall be two examinations for every candidate for this degree: a 
general examination, before entering upon the work of the last two years, 
covering the elementary medical sciences; and a final examination, upon 
acceptance of the thesis, covering the particular medical science chosen as 
a special field. 

The fees for the first two years are the same as for medical students. 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

The Dean's Office makes every effort to assist students in obtaining part- 
time work during the college year and full-time work during the summer 
vacation. The service is furnished without cost either to the student or to 
the employer. It is recommended, however, unless a student sees reasonably 
clearly how he will meet the expenses of at least the first year in the School, 
that he postpone his entrance until he can save enough money to get started 
without having ahead of him oppressive financial worry. 

Only a limited amount of outside work can be done without being a tax 
on the student's health and scholarship, and the student is urged, when it is 
possible, to devote himself to a regular program of study and recreation, 
giving as little time to outside work as is feasible with his plan for financing 
his medical education. A limited number of positions offering room and 
board in return for laboratory or minor clinical services in hospitals are 
available to second, third, and fourth year students. Fewer opportunities are 
open to first year men. When a student's standing is such that it is felt he 



Ills WD I \IM Ns| S 2<J 

can carry outside work, the Dean's Office makes every effort to assist him 
to obtain pan time work daring the school year. 



MICROSCOPES 

The School requires that each student secure .1 standard student micro- 
scope, preferably less than twenty yean old, with two oculars and three 

objectives including an oil immersion lens. \ mechanical Stage is nor essen- 
tial. A few microscopes are available for rental each year through the Dean's 
Office to students unable to provide their own microscopes. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

An estimate of total yearly expenses shows that the average cost of the 
school year is $2,200 for each academic year. This estimate includes tuition, 
medical and infirmary fee, board and room, books, laundry and incidentals. 

The fees are: — For matriculation, $5; for medical and infirmary fee, $30 
for each year; for instruction (including laboratory charges except micro- 
scope rental, breakage, damage and loss of apparatus), $800 for each year. 

The term-bills are issued approximately every two months. 

Bills for miscellaneous charges will be rendered at the time the indebted- 
ness is incurred. 

All indebtedness to the University must be paid bv all candidates for de- 
grees at least one day before Commencement. 

Students who are candidates for degrees in the middle of the academic 
year must pay all dues to the University at least one day before the day 
upon which the degrees are to be voted. 

The term-bills are sent to the student at his college address unless the 
Bursar is requested in writing to send them elsewhere. 

When a student's connection with the University is severed, all charges 
against him must be paid at once. 

A deposit of $50 is required of every new student who accepts a place in 
the Medical School; this sum to be applied on his first term-bill or to be for- 
feited if the student does not register. 

Any student whose indebtedness to the University remains unpaid on the 
date fixed for payment is deprived of the privileges of the University until 
he is reinstated. Reinstatement is obtained onlv bv consent of the Dean of 
the Department in which the student is enrolled, after payment of all indebt- 
edness. A fee of Sio is automatically added to all bills which are unpaid bv 
the due date. Students will be held responsible for the payment of fees until 
they have notified the Dean, in writing, of their intention to withdraw from 
the School, and have subsequently received their bond from the Bursar. 



30 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 



Dormitory 



Vanderbilt Hall, the Medical School dormitory, has accommodations for 
325 male students. The majority of the rooms are designed for one occupant. 
Many of the rooms communicate directly with the adjacent room, and there 
are also a number of suites for two or more persons. The price of rooms 
ranges from Si 80 to $360 per person for the academic year. Application 
forms for rooms in Vanderbilt Hall will be sent to all new students ap- 
proximately four months before registration day. The date on which they 
must be returned in order to be included in the drawing will be announced 
at that time. Students are permitted to reengage their rooms for the follow- 
ing year by signing lease cards at the Dean's Office. The dormitory has 
squash courts and a gymnasium which are open to members of the teaching 
star! and students of the Medical School. In addition the School has tennis 
courts and has an outside exercise field. There is a parking lot for auto- 
mobiles behind the hall which is owned by the School. No charge is made 
for this facility and the School assumes no responsibility for loss or damage 
to automobiles or other property left in the lot. 

The dormitory contains a large dining hall which is available for all mem- 
bers of the Medical School. Meals are served at reasonable prices. 

Bond Required of Students 

On his entrance to the School every student is required to file with the 
Bursar a bond in the sum of $500 as security for payment of University bills. 
The bond must be signed by two bondsmen, both of whom must be citizens 
of the United States, or by a surety company duly qualified to do business 
in Massachusetts. 

No officer or student of the University will be accepted as a bondsman 
and in no case will more than one parent be accepted as a bondsman. In lieu 
of the bond a student may deposit with the Bursar five hundred dollars in 
United States government coupon bonds, or five hundred dollars in cash 
which will bear no interest. 

Medical Attendance 

A medical adviser who is a member of the University Department of 
I [ygiene may be seen in his office in Vanderbilt Hall, Harvard Medical 
School, from 8.15 a.m. to 9.00 a.m. and 4.00 p.m. to 5.30 p.m. on weekdays. 
On Saturdays and holidays, he will be available between 9.00 a.m. and 10.00 
a.m. I le may also be seen at other times by appointment and can be reached 
at any time in case of emergency. 

A complete medical examination of each new student will be made at the 



I i LLOWSH1PS \M) SCHOLARSHIPS 31 

beginning of die school \ ear. I he l toil ersity maintains an infirmary in I 
bridge winch is available to medical students, lor more icrious cases, the 
teaching hospitals associated with Harvard Medical School arc nrilii 

For information regarding the payment of medical and infirmary fees, die 
civilian student may consult the University Catalogue. 

A certificate of vaccination is required of each student before registration. 

Any illness necessitating absence from work must be reported to the 
medical adviser. 



FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

Fellowships 

The amount of the stipend of the Fellowships and Scholarships is approxi- 
mate only and contingent upon the income of the University. 

Students who marry while on a fellowship will forfeit the fellowship unless 
at the time of their application they have notified the Committee of their 
intention to marry. 

Edward 11k kxing Bradford (1918). Anonymous. To be used for medical 
research or instruction separately or in connection with any other founda- 
tion, in such manner as may be prescribed. 51.400 

John White Browne (191 8). .Mrs. Francis B. Greene. For a young man 
of unusual promise to pursue research investigations for one year at the 
Flarvard Medical School or elsewhere. 

Bullard (1891). William Story Billiard, in memory of three physicians 
"distinguished for their honorable personal character and their professional 
services in this community" : 

George Cheyne Shattuck Memorial $375 

John Ware Memorial 375 

Charles Eliot Ware Memorial J75 

Any one or all of these fellowships may be paid to any student or member 
of the medical profession appointed to make such original investigations in 
Medical Science as will be most useful to the profession and to the commu- 
nity. The results of these investigations shall not, however, be published as 
a research performed under the grant of a Bullard Fellowship, unless the 
work shall have received the approval of the Committee. 

Holders of the fellowships must do throughout the academic \ ear die 
equivalent of at least ten hours' work a week and make a report thereon. 

Arthur Tracy Cabot (1913). Dr. and Mrs. Frederick Cheever Shattuck. 
In memory of Arthur Tracy Cabot, A.B. 187:, M.D. 1876. For students of 
surgery. Ordinarily the incumbent may not engage in active practice, but is 



32 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

to devote himself to the advancement of surgery in the United States or else- 
where. Nomination to this fellowship is by preference to be made by the 
Moseley Professor of Surgery. $1,400 

James Jackson Cabot (1906). Arthur T. Cabot, Samuel Cabot, and Guy C. 
Cabot. Income to be used to "aid and encourage practical work in scientific 
medicine." $900 

Walter Bradford Cannon (1945). Mr. Joseph F. and Mrs. Clara Ford. 
A fellowship in Physiology. $400 

Harold C. Ernst Memorial Fund (1938). Mrs. Ellen L. Ernst. A scholar- 
ship or fellowship in the Department of Bacteriology. $3,000 

Charles Follen Folsom (1908). Founded by more than sixty persons in 
memory of Charles Follen Folsom, A.B. 1862, M.D. 1870. A Teaching Fel- 
lowship in Hygiene or in Mental and Nervous Diseases. For the present 
assigned to the Department of Neuropathology. $950 

Louis W. Gilbert (1943). S. Louise Gilbert. Income to be used for the 
study of chronic diseases. $1,500 

Charles Dustin Hunking, M.D. (1948). Sarah S. H. Cheney, in memory 
of her brother, Charles Dustin Hunking, M.D., a member of the Class of 
1 87 1 of Harvard University and of the Class of 1876 of Harvard Medical 
School. To enable a graduate of Harvard Medical School, who is also a 
native of Haverhill, Mass., to do medical research. $200 

Louis E. Kirstein (1937). Friends of Louis E. Kirstein. For the promotion 
of scientific medical education. $1,700 

William O. Moseley, Jr., Travelling Fellowships (191 2). Mrs. William 
O. Moseley. For students who have attended the School for three or four 
years, to enable them to continue the study of medicine in Europe. Either 
two or three fellowships will be awarded. $3,500 

Francis Weld Peabody Memorial (1929). To be awarded on the recom- 
mendation of the Dean and full professors of Medicine in charge of the 
clinics of the Boston City Hospital, the Massachusetts General Hospital, and 
the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, to properly qualified graduates of medical 
schools to enable them to devote further time to intensive clinical and 
laboratory studies. $2,500 

Jeffrey Richardson (1933). William Lambert Richardson, A.B. 1864, 
M.D. 1867. To be awarded each year to some deserving student, upon his 
graduation from the Harvard Medical School, who desires to continue his 
studies either here or abroad. $1,900 

Henry P. Walcott (1910). Dr. Frederick Cheever Shattuck. For a Fellow 
in Clinical Medicine appointed on nomination by the Jackson Professor of 



FELLOWSHIPS \\i> SCHOLARSHIPS 33 

Clinical Medicine. The recipient shall not engage in private practice but 
must devote his time to teaching and clinical research. 
Whitman (1933). Mrs. Bernard C. Whitman, in memory of her husband 

Bernard C. Whitman, A.B. [846, and of her son Crosby C. Whitman, A. 15. 
1886. Available for a graduate of Harvard .Medical School pursuing the 
studv of medicine or surgery at the Ecole de Mcdecine de Paris. S475 

William Hunter Workman (1925). William Hunter Workman, M.l). 
1873. To enable one or more graduates of the Harvard Medical School to 
pursue postgraduate studies in medicine in this country or abroad. In ex- 
ceptional cases, fourth year students will be eligible. Si, 300 

Scholarships 
Harvard Medical School National Scholarships 

In order to make it possible for young men of outstanding abilitv and 
promise to come to the Harvard Medical School, two or three Harvard 
Medical School National Scholarships will be offered to incoming members 
of the first year class. These scholarships will carry a stipend sufficiently 
large, if necessary, to meet all the student's essential expenses. Successful 
applicants who maintain a high honor record at the Medical School will 
continue to hold these scholarships throughout the Medical School course. 

The offer of these scholarships is made possible by gifts from Mr. Edward 
S. Harkness, Dr. Daniel F. Jones, and Dr. Franklin S. Newell. The donors 
expressed the hope that through these scholarships superior men who could 
otherwise not receive a medical education would be enabled to attend the 
Harvard Medical School. They also expressed the hope that some of these 
men might wish to return to their own communities to carry on the prac- 
tice of medicine. 

Direct application for these scholarships cannot be made since all accepted 
first year students are considered as candidates, the awards being made with- 
out reference to financial circumstances. The stipend will vary depending 
on the resources of the recipient. 

General Scholarships 

The following scholarships are open to students who have been admitted 
to the School at the time of application. Approximately $22,500 is available 
annually from the general scholarship funds. 

The Cheevcr, Greene, Haven, and Mears Scholarships are awarded to stu- 
dents of the first year class. The Hayden and W'ebster Scholarships may be 
so awarded. All the other scholarships are awarded to members of the three 
upper classes. 



34 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

Scholarships and gratuities are awarded to such men among those applying 
for and needing assistance as give evidence of having done the best work in 
this School. 

Information with regard to all forms of pecuniary aid may be obtained 
from the Dean's Office. Students requiring aid should visit the Dean's Office 
as soon as possible after matriculation to discuss their financial needs. 

Aesculapian Club (1938). To be used for loans or scholarships. 

Edward Dana Barbour Fund (1928). For promoting medical education in 
China, preference to students coming from Shanghai or its environs. 

Edward M. Barringer Fund (1881). Edward M. Barringer. For the main- 
tenance of two scholarships for students in the Harvard Medical School. 
Awarded to deserving students, preference being given to those of the fourth 
year class. 

Edward M. Barringer No. 1 

Edward M. Barringer No. 2 

Gordon Bartlett (191 9). Mr. and Mrs. Donald Gordon, in memory of 
their nephew, Gordon Bartlett, a student at Dartmouth College who died of 
wounds at St. Mihiel while serving in the Seventeenth Field Artillery. Pref- 
erence is given to graduates of Dartmouth College. This scholarship will 
ordinarily be divided between two men. 

Matthew and Mary E. Bartlett (1916). Miss Fannie Bartlett, in memory 
of Matthew and Mary E. Bartlett. For the benefit of a worthy and meritori- 
ous student who is in need of financial assistance. 

Lucius F. Billings (1900). Lucius F. Billings. May be divided between 
two or more students. 

Dr. Robert Bonney Fund (1944). Robert Bonney, M.D. 1898. For the 
aid of needy and meritorious students. 

Henry Fassett Castle (1941). William E. Castle, A.B. 1893, A.M. 1894, 
Ph.D. 1895, as a memorial to his son, Henry Fassett Castle, who died in No- 
vember, 191 9, at the age of 19, having completed the previous June the work 
of the first year in the Medical School. 

David Williams Cheever (1889). David Williams Cheever, A.B. 1852, 
M.D. 1858, LL.D. For a first year student after three months' study in the 
Medical School. 

David Williams Cheever #2 (1947). David Cheever, A.B. 1897, M.D. 
1 90 1. To be awarded at the beginning of the year to a first year medical 
student in hope that after the stated probationary period he may be awarded 
the scholarship founded by David Williams Cheever, A.B. 1852, M.D. 1858. 



FELLOWSHIPS AM) SCHOLARSHIPS 35 

Cottinc; Gift (1900). Benjamin I'.. Cotting, A.B. 1834, .M.I). 1837. Awarded 

on the basis of pecuniary need, intellectual capacity, faithfulness and earnest 
endeavor. 

Orlando VV. Doe (1893). Orlando Witherspoon Doc, A. 15. 1865, M.D. 
1869. To be given annually to a deserving student in the Medical depart- 
ment. 

George Russell Eager (1936). Miss Mabel T. Eager, in memory of her 
father. 

Henry Ehrlich Memorial (1927). Friends and family of Henry Ehrlich, 
M.D. 1886. To be used for the assistance of needy and worthy students 
regardless of creed or color. 

Horace Putnam Farnham (191 8). Mrs. Eliza Cary Farnham in memory 
of her husband, Dr. Horace Putnam Farnham, A.B. 1843. For the benefit of 
meritorious students in the Harvard Medical School. 

Dr. E. Peabody Gerry (1943). The income to aid first year students. 

Charlotte Greene (1925). Edwin Farnham Greene. For a first year stu- 
dent whose previous record indicates special promise. 

Dr. C. Eugene Gunther (1933). Mrs. C. Eugene Gunther in memory of 
her husband. To be used to maintain two scholarships for the benefit of 
deserving medical students. 

George Haven (1913). George Haven, M.D. 1883. To be used annually 
for scholarships for students of the first year in the Medical School. 

Lewis and Harriet Hayden (1894). Mrs. Harriet Hayden. For colored 
students. The income may be divided. If not awarded in the Medical School, 
the School of Public Health, or the School of Dental Medicine, it is open to 
colored students in any other department of the University. 

William Otis Johnson (191 i). Mrs. William O. Johnson, in memory' of 
her husband, William Otis Johnson, A.B. 1845, M.D. 1848. 

Claudius M. Jones (1893). Claudius Marcellus Jones, A.B. 1866, M.D. 1875. 

Alfred Hosmer Linder (1895). Mrs. George Linder. For a student of 
sound principles and marked ability. 

Medical School Class of 1879 (1909). Established bv the Class of 1879 
as a loan fund and later converted to a scholarship. 

James Ewing Mears, M.D. (1909). J. Ewing Mears. For a student 
throughout the full course of four years, subject to his scholastic standing 
and good conduct. 

Ernest Omar Nay (1947). Ernest Omar Nay, .M.D. 1919. For a medical 
student from the states of Indiana, Illinois or Ohio whose scholarship is 



36 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

above the average and whose financial resources are such that he cannot 
unaided acquire a medical education. 

Joseph Pearson Oliver (1904). Patients of Joseph Pearson Oliver, M.D. 
1 87 1. To be awarded to a needy and deserving student of the Medical School. 

John Eliot Overlander (1947). John Eliot Overlander, M.D. 1909. To 
assist such needy medical students as may be deemed worthy of assistance 
by the proper authorities. 

Charles B. Porter (1897). William L. Chase. 

Flavius Searle (1921). Miss Mary L. Searle, in memory of her father, 
Dr. Flavius Searle. The stipend may be divided. 

Joseph J. Silbert (1937). For scholarship or loans to needy students. 

Francis Skinner (1905). Francis Skinner, Esq. To be used in small sums 
to meet the urgent needs of meritorious students in the payment of term-bills 
or other expenses. 

Charles Pratt Strong (1894). Friends and patients of the late Charles 
Pratt Strong, A.B. 1876, M.D. 1881. 

Isaac Sweetser (1892). Mrs. Anne M. Sweetser. To be "devoted to the 
aid of poor students of ability who would not otherwise be able to continue 
the studies necessary for their profession". 

John Thomson Taylor (1899). Mrs. Frederic D. Philips, in memory of 
her brother, John Thomson Taylor. To be paid to some meritorious under- 
graduate of the Medical School without regard to his pecuniary circum- 
stances. 

Walker Scholarships (1922). Miss Leslie Walton Walker, four scholar- 
ships. 

Dr. Charles Walker 

Helen L. Walker 

Anna G. Walker 

Leslie W. Walker 

Abraham A. Watson (1923). Miss Catherine E. Walker. For the benefit 
of students in the Medical School. 

Edward Wigglesworth (1897). The family of Edward Wigglesworth, 
A.B. 1861, M.D. 1865. 

School of Dental Medicine Scholarships 

The Alford Fund (1785). Mrs. Joanna Alford. "To be used for scholar- 
ships for those students who are under low and indigent circumstances." 



FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 37 

Dwight M. Clapf (1926). Clara Josephine Qapp in memory of her hus- 
band, Dwight Al. Qapp, D.MJX 1HH2. For the education of a male student 
born in Massachusetts, preferably one who has 1 college education or 

training of a classical character. 

Dental School Alumni (1937). A general scholarship after the income 
has reached Si 00 annually. 

Harvard Dental Alumni Association Scholarships (1949). 'Income sup- 
ported by annual gifts.) Scholarship for third or fourth year student or 
fellowship for graduate work. Selection of candidate to be based upon 
character, scholarship and promise within the field of dentistry. 

Thomas Alexander Forsyth (1929). Thomas Alexander Forsyth. Con- 
tinuous scholarship to two deserving men who have passed the scholarship 
requirements. 

Eugene Hanes Smith (1920). Alumni Association. To be awarded to a 
third or fourth year student who has been a student in regular standing 
during the first and second years. 

Peter E. Strauss (1922). Emily R. M. Strauss. In memory of her hus- 
band. 

Fellowships and Scholarships Available in other Departments of the 

University as well as in the Medical School and School of 

Dental Medicine 

Unless otherwise stated, applications should be made, before February m, 
to the Deans of the Medical School and School of Dental Medicine. 

Austin Fellowships or Scholarships (1899). Established under the will of 
Edward Austin. 

Ellen S. Bates (1929). 

Baxendale (1928). Preference: (1) descendants of Alan Bedford Hudson; 
(2) students of the name of Baxendale or Hudson; (3) students from the 
City of Brockton, Mass., or from the Town of Bourne, Mass. 

Bright (1880). For descendants of Henry Bright, Jr., of Watertown, Mass.. 
who bear the name of Bright. 

Daniel A. Buckley (1905). For graduates of Cambridge public schools. 

Victor Emanuel Chapman Memorial (1917). Several donors. In mem- 
ory of Victor Emanuel Chapman, A.B. 191 3, killed in World War I. For 
a French youth (or youths) for study in some department of Harvard 
Universitv. 

Joseph Hodges Choate Memorial (1919). Harvard Club of New York 
City. In memory of Ambassador Joseph Hodges Choate, A.B. 1852. Awarded 



38 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

upon the nomination of the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cam- 
bridge, England, to a British subject coming from that University to study 
in any department of Harvard University. 

George Chase Christian Memorial Scholarships (1936). To be awarded 
as National Scholarships to residents of Minesota. 

Charles Downer Scholarship (1927). (1) to descendants of Joseph and 
Robert Downer, of Wiltshire, England, who came to America at about the 
year 1650. (2) To those of English or Anglo-Saxon stock, bearing the sur- 
name of Downer by right of birth or inheritance. If the income from the 
fund is not in this manner wholly used, awards to students may be made to: 

( 1 ) Descendants of members of the Class of 1 889. 

(2) Those whose homes are in the State of Vermont. 

(3) Descendants of graduates of Harvard College. 

(4) Those "of that old Anglo-Saxon stock which has gone forth from 
New England into all parts of the U. S. and has been the means of 
giving strength and stability and character to our government." 

Joseph Eveleth (1896). Joseph Eveleth. To aid students in Harvard Col- 
lege or any of the schools connected therewith. 

Gage Scholarship (1948). Established under the will of Dr. Homer Gage. 
"For one or more scholarships in such departments of the University as the 
said President and Fellows may determine." 

Jean Gaillard Memorial Fellowship (1946). Established in memory 
of Jean Gaillard, a student of the Ecole Centrale des Arts et Manufactures 
in Paris, who served as an Aspirant in the French Air Forces, was arrested 
by the German Gestapo, and died in the German concentration camp at 
Ravensbrueck April 16, 1945, a victim of Nazi inhumanity. For a French 
youth for study in any department of Harvard University. 

Harvard Club Scholarships. These scholarships are maintained by the 
various Harvard Clubs. The number of scholarships and the stipends are 
subject to change, as they are for the most part not endowed. Though 
primarily for Freshmen, some arc occasionally awarded to upperclassmen 
or graduate students. 

John Tyler Hassam (1941). Established under the will of Eleanor 
Hassam in memory of her father, John Tyler Hassam, A.B. 1863. 

William Hilton (1897). Established under the will of William Hilton. 

Charles W. Holtzer (1929). For students of German birth who have re- 
ceived their preliminary education in German institutions of learning. 

Frank Knox Memorial Fellowships (1948). Established by Mrs. Frank 
Knox in memory of her husband, Colonel Frank Knox, LL.D. (hon.) 



l I I I OWSHIPS WD SCHOLARSHIPS $9 

Harvard, 1942, Secretary of the United States Navy, 1940 44. To be awarded 
annually: 

i. To a student or students chosen from any one of the nations included in 
the British Commonwealth: the United Kingdom, the Union of South 
Africa, Canada, Newfoundland, Australia, and New Zealand, who shall 
devote a major parr of the period of liis study in any one of die Faculties 
of I larvard University. 
2. To a recent graduate of Harvard College or to a student having com- 
pleted at least one year of study in one of I larvard University's graduate 
Faculties for study in any one of the nations in the British Common- 
w ealth as stated above. 

Akhu i; Lehman Fund (1936). Established in memory of Arthur Lehman 
of the Class of 1K94. For fellowships in the graduate and professional schools 
only of I larvard University. 

Lincoln (1876). Preference: students from Lincoln, Mass. 

John Parker (1873). 

Frederick E. Parlin (1928). Preference: natives of Maiden or Everett, 
Mass. 

William Pennoyer Bequest (1670). Established under the will of Wil- 
liam Pennoyer of England, for two fellows and two scholars; one preferably 
to be a descendant of Robert Pennoyer (a brother of William) and the 
other of the New Haven Colony. Preference to be given to undergraduate 
descendants, and if no undergraduates apply, graduate student descendants 
will be eligible for consideration. 

Aristides Evangelus Phoutrides (1925). For students of Greek birth or 
of Greek parentage. 

Princeton (1910). Preference: a graduate of Princeton University. Appli- 
cation should be made to the Dean of the Graduate School of Princeton 
University before February 10. 

Leon W. Redpath (1938). For deserving students from the State of Ohio. 
Preference: students from Stark and Tuscarawas Counties. 

Franklin Reynolds (1925). Established under the will of John F. Rey- 
nolds. For students in any department of Harvard University and RadclirTc 
College who are natives of Marblehead, Mass. Graduate students should 
submit applications directly to the Committee on Scholarships in Harvard 
College, 20 University Hall. 

James A. Rumrill (1909). For a properly qualified graduate of a college 
or university in Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida, Georgia. 
Tennessee, or Kentucky. The selection to be made on the advice of the 
President and Faculty of the institution from which the student comes. 



40 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

Peter Brooks Saltonstall '43 Memorial Fellowship (1947). Established 
bv Senator Leverett Saltonstall in memory of f his son, Peter B. Saltonstall. 
To assist a worthy student from the Hawaiian Islands and those islands 
west of Hawaii, including New Zealand, the Fiji Islands and Australia, in 
obtaining an education in any department of the University. The purpose 
of this memorial is to further the education, the health and welfare of the 
peoples inhabiting the above named regions of the far Pacific. The stipend 
shall be set to supplement the holder's income sufficiently to defray all his 
basic expenses of tuition, board and room, and in certain instances some 
travel allowance may be included. 

Frederick Sheldon (1909). Awarded as travelling fellowships to students 
in the University who are holders of a Harvard degree. Application must be 
made before February 1 . About ten fellowships are awarded, the maximum 
amount being $1,500. 

Charles H. Smith Bequest (1947). Established under the will of Charles 
H. Smith. For "the payment of scholarships ... to students for the time 
being in said University who shall be graduates from any of the High 
Schools of the City of Providence; and if there shall at any time, be no 
such students in said University, then to such other students in said Uni- 
versity 7 . . . ." 

Stoughton (1701). Preference: (1) students from Dorchester, Mass.; 
(2) students from Milton, Mass. 

Augustus Clifford Tower (1927). Established under the will of Augustus 
Clifford Tower. One fellowship to be awarded annually to a graduate of 
Harvard College for study in a French University, preference to be given 
to a student of Anglo-Saxon descent; the other to be awarded annually 
to a French student for study in any graduate department of Harvard 
University. 

Anna Vaughan Foundation (1935). 

Sarah L. Viehmann (1936). Established by Henry Bluestone (A.B. 1906) 
in memory of his mother, Sarah L. Viehmann. 

Major Harrison Briggs Webster (1921). Mrs. Andrew G. Webster, in 
memory of her son Major Harrison Briggs Webster, A.B. 1905, M.D. 1909, 
Regimental Surgeon, Killed in World War I. Preference on recommenda- 
tion of the Class Committee, to sons of members of the Class of 1905; but 
if there are no such applicants, the scholarship may be awarded to a stu- 
dent in the Medical School. 

1902 World War Memorial (1923). Preference: (1) sons of 1902 men 
killed in World War I; (2) descendants of the Aiembcrs of the Class of 
1902. 



I.ow FUNDS 41 



PRIZES 



Isaac Adi.i-r (1934). Frida Adler. To l>e awarded once in three yean foi 

the best piece of original research within th.it period in the United States or 
Canada on any subject within the medical or allied sciences. 

Henry Asbury Christian (1937). Dr. Samuel A. I.cvinc. To DC awarded 
annually on or about the seventeenth of February, which is Dr. Christian's 
birthday, to the student in the Fourth Year Class who has displayed diligence 
and notable scholarship in his studies and offers promise for the future. $100 



LOAN FUNDS 

Apply at Dean's Office 

Funds have been established to which students who are in need of money 
may make applications for loans. 

In case of unforeseen emergency loans may be made at any time. Loans 
are made to meet term-bills and cash is provided rarelv. 

Loans will be made to students whose records are creditable to make it 
probable that they will remain in the School and whose other financial 
obligations do not make it improbable that this loan will be repaid. 

Interest at the rate of 1% per year will be charged on loans, chargeable 
on the first of July and continuing at this rate until the July 1st subsequent 
to the completion of three years following a borrower's graduation from 
the School. Thereafter, interest at the rate of 4/2% per year will be charged 
annually on July 1st on outstanding loans. 

In cases where the student borrower, for any reason, leaves the School 
prior to graduation, interest at the rate of 1% will be charged from the date 
of loan until the date of separation from the School and interest at the rate 
of 4 Vz % will be charged thereafter. 

Notes are payable at any time but become due on July 1st five years 
after graduation. 

Medical School 

David L. Edsall Revolving Loan Fund (1928). Dr. Frederick C. Shattuck 
established this fund by gift of 100,000 to be used as a revolving loan fund. 

Charles William Eliot Loan Fund (19:4). Given anonymously in honor 
of President Eliot. Principal and interest to be used for loans to students in 
the Medical School. 

Harvard Medical Alumni Loan Fund ( 1943). Harvard War Loan ( 1920). 
Harriet P. Keith Loan (1921 ). Francis I. Proctor Aid Fund (1942). 



42 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

School of Dental Medicine 

Christian Soldier Loan Fund (1925). Established by Miss Caroline F. 
Anderson for the benefit of needy and deserving students. 

Dental Alumni Loan Fund (1927). Dental Alumni Association and 
Classes of 1900, 1901, 1902, 1904, 1905, 1906 and 1908. To aid any deserving 
students who require financial assistance. 

Lucinda Davis Fernald Fund (1936). Established by Dr. Adelbert 
Fernald for the benefit of deserving New England born students of good 
character. 

Robert T. Moffatt Fund (1925). Given by Dr. Robert T. MofTatt for the 
benefit of deserving students in need of financial aid. 



LECTURESHIPS 

The Edward K. Dunham Lectures for the promotion of the medical sci- 
ences have been given annually since 1923 by eminent investigators and teach- 
ers in one of the branches of the medical sciences or of the basic sciences 
which contribute toward the advance of medical science in the broadest 
sense. The lectures are open to the Faculty and students of the Harvard 
Medical School and College and all other interested professional persons. 
The lectures are given under the fund established for that purpose by Mary 
Dows Dunham in memory of her husband, Dr. Edward K. Dunham. 

The George W. Gay Lectures upon Medical Ethics are given annually at 
the Harvard Medical School. The fund for the establishment of these lec- 
tures was given in 191 7 by Dr. George W. Gay. 



THE CANCER COMMISSION OF HARVARD UNIVERSITY 

Under the will of the late Mrs. Caroline Brewer Croft a sum of money was 
received in 1899 for the investigation of the cause and treatment of cancer. 
Since that time other sums have been contributed for cancer research and the 
Cancer Commission of Harvard University has been organized. 

The Commission supports the Huntington Hospital beds, out-patient de- 
partment, and cancer research laboratories at the Massachusetts General Hos- 
pital. It makes grants in aid to various departments of the University carrying 
on investigation on the cancer problem, and provides a service for pathologi- 
cal examination and diagnosis of tumor tissue for the State of Massachusetts. 
This service was transferred in 1951 from the buildings of the Harvard Medi- 



COURSES FOR GR U)l ITES 43 

cal School to laboratories made aavilable to the Cancel Commission in die 
newly constructed Cancer Institute of the New England Deaconess Hospital. 
Tins move will facilitate the Commission's interest in research in pathology 

and provide for close integration of the activities ;it the Ne\«, England 
Deaconess I [ospital and the cancer control activities of the I larvard Medical 

School and the 1 larvard School of Public 1 lealth. 

The functions of the Cancer Commission are exercised l>v the Committee 
of Research and Development which is made up of the following members: 
James Bryant Conant, Chairman; George Packer Berry, Paul I lerman Unci;. 
James Morse Dunning, Richmond Keith Kane, Edward Reynolds, James 
Stevens Simmons, Henry Coe Meadow, Executive Secretary. 



PROCTOR FUND 

A bequest of fifty thousand dollars by Ellen Osborne Proctor, for the pur- 
pose of promoting the study of chronic diseases, subsequentlv has been in- 
creased bv an additional fifty thousand dollars from another member of the 
Proctor family. The income of this fund is to be devoted to investigations 
into the nature and treatment of chronic diseases and the care of persons 
afflicted with these diseases while in hospitals for such investigations. The 
special disposition of the income of this fund is under the control of a com- 
mittee composed of the professors of Theory and Practice of Phvsic, 
Clinical Medicine, and Pathology. George W. Thorn, M.D., is Chairman 
of the Proctor Fund Committee. Applications for grants should be sent to 
the Chairman, preferably on May 1st of each year. 



WILLIAM W. WELLINGTON FUND 

In 1925 a bequest was received from William H. Wellington to establish 
the "William W. Wellington Memorial Research Fund." The income of 
this fund is to be applied for research concerning the etiologv and thera- 
peutics of the diseases of man, and is to be administered bv a Committee 
composed of the heads of the departments of Pathology, Medicine, and 
Pharmacology. Dr. J. Howard Means is the Chairman. 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

The object of this division of the Medical School is to offer to graduates 
in Medicine opportunities to continue their studies in a thorough and sci- 
entific manner. 



44 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

For information concerning courses offered the Catalogue of Courses for 
Graduates should be consulted. 

Facilities at the Harvard Medical School and the abundant clinical oppor- 
tunities in the various hospitals are available for graduate instruction. Eugene 
C. Eppinger, M.D., Assistant Dean, is in charge. 



SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH 

The School of Public Health is one of the graduate schools of the Uni- 
versitv and its purpose is to train public health administrators, as well as 
teachers and research scientists. The School conducts research and provides 
basic and advanced courses in fundamental fields of public health, such as 
biostatistics, epidemiology and sanitation; in the application of such medical 
disciplines as microbiology, physiology and biochemistry to the problems 
of conservation of group and of individual health; and in administrative 
methods used by the health officer in general fields as well as in special 
activities such as maternal and child health, industrial hygiene, cancer con- 
trol and medical care. 

Courses may be taken singly, on approval of the head of the department 
concerned. For further information, apply to the Secretary of the School, 
at 55 Shattuck Street. 



OPPORTUNITIES FOR RESEARCH 

The research laboratories of the Medical School and its associated hos- 
pitals offer to students exceptional opportunities for training in research. 
Medical students with a special interest in some branch of the medical sci- 
ences or who wish to become familiar with investigative and research 
methods may devote their spare time to intensive work on a well defined 
problem. Such research may be conducted on a completely informal basis 
by mutual arrangement between the students and a member of the teaching 
staff, or under the Tutorial System. 

The Tutorial System was established in 1923 for the specific purpose of 
encouraging and facilitating research by undergraduate medical students. 
There are three Tutors, one in the Preclinical Sciences, one in Medicine, 
and one in Surgery, to guide students into research in those fields. Stu- 
dents interested in research under the Tutorial System should consult the 
Tutor in Preclinical Sciences, who will assist them in being placed with the 
member of the Faculty best fitted for their particular needs. This may be 
done at any time, but preferably during the second semester of the first 
year. It is thereby possible for students to pursue a particular line of in- 



THE UNDERGR KDX \ I I \S&1 MB1 \ 4; 

vest ig.it ion under the guidance of a faculty member throughout their first 

three years of medical school. In addition, the I utors w ill arrange series 
of seminars for Students of each class who are interested in research. 

In the fourth year, the Faculty permits students who have shown promise 

in extracurricular research to devote a considerable portion of their time- 
to a specific problem in one of the basic medical sciences or major clinical 
division. This privilege is granted ro nor more than fifteen per cent 
class and only to students who rank in the upper half of their cla 
dents seeking this privilege should apply in writing before April 1st of their 
third year to the Chairman of the Tutorial System, stating their plan of 
work, and not only must obtain the approval of the Tutorial System, acting 
as a committee, but also of the man under whose guidance the actual work 
will be done. Each application is then considered individually by the Ad- 
ministrative Board for final approval on recommendation of the members of 
the Tutorial System. If his application is approved, the student may have- 
four to six months of his fourth year free to engage in research. 

PREDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIPS 

The Faculty permits students to withdraw from their formal medical 
training after the first, second, or third years to pursue research intensively 
for a year. A number of predoctoral fellowships are available for the sup- 
port of such research training. Students interested in availing themselves 
of this opportunity should inquire of the Chairman of the Tutorial System. 

THE UNDERGRADUATE ASSEMBLY 

The Undergraduate Assembly, held late in the spring of each year under 
student auspices, provides an opportunity for students from all classes to 
present formally the results of their investigations to the students and 
Faculty of the Medical School. 



46 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 



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ANNO! Mi mini 01 I 01 RSI S 47 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES * 

I he "Announcement of Courses" comprisi ich depart- 

ment as to its genera] plan of instinct ion and its rariotu required exercises, 
followed by a resume of the Fourth Year I Lecthre Courses and die Voluntary 
Courses. 

Each student in the fourth year must secure credit for eight one-month 

courses of 144 hours or their equivalent. Required courses fill seven months' 

time, Leaving one month free for elective work. In the following statements 
whole courses have a value of 144 hours, half-courses of 72 hours, and 
quarter-courses of 36 hours. 

An opportunity for voluntary work is offered to second ami third 
students on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons. It is believed that upperclass- 
men will welcome a chance to keep in touch with the most recent develop- 
ments in the fundamental sciences; that an interest in certain fundamental 
subjects will have been aroused by their clinical work; or that they may feel 
the desire for additional training on some point. Students are not required or 
even asked to take this work. It is entirely a voluntary matter, and no credit 
will be given. 

There are also opportunities for association with voluntary groups inter- 
ested in studying the more general aspects of medicine, including the eco- 
nomic, social and historical aspects. 



Abbreviations used in the following pages, and in the tabular views: 
B.C.H. = Boston City Hospital. H.M.H. = Haynes Memorial Hospital. 

B.l.H. = Beth Israel Hospital. M. E.E.I. = Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. 

B.L.I.H. = Boston Lying-in Hospital. M.G.H. = Massachusetts General Hospital. 

B.P.H. = Boston Psychopathic Hospital. X.E.D.H. = New England Deaconess Hospital. 
C.M.C. = Children's Medical Center P.B.B.H. = Feter Bent Brijrham Hospital. 
F.H.W. = Free Hospital for Women. S.D.M. = School of Dental Medicine. 
H.M.S. = Harvard Medical School. S.P.H. = School of Public Health. 

P.L.I. = Providence Lying-in Hospital. 



Anatomy 

George B. Wislocki, M.D., Hersey Professor of Anatomy and James Still- 
man Professor of Comparative Anatomy, and Head of the Department. 
Franklin F. Snyder, M.D., Associate Professor of Anatomy and Obstetrics. 
Marcus Singer, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 
Helen W. Dfane, Ph.D., Associate in Anatomy. 
Edward A. Edwards, M.D., Clinical Associate in Anatomy. 
Don W. Fawcett, M.D., Associate in Anatomy. 

* Special pamphlets are issued describing the opportunities for elective and voluntary work 
and outlining the conditions under which such work may be undertaken. 



48 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

Charles P. Lyman, Ph.D., Research Associate in Anatomy. 
Russell J. Barrnett, M.D., Instructor in Anatomy. 
Elizabeth H. Leduc, Ph.D., Instructor in Anatomy. 
Thomas C. Hall, M.D., Research Fellow in Anatomy. 
George F. Odland, M.D., Research Fellow in Anatomy. 
Leon P. Weiss, M.D., Research Fellow in Anatomy. 
Richard H. Cardozo, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Anatomy. 
George L. Nardi, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Anatomy. 
Richard L. Smythe, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Anatomy. 
Roy O. Greep, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Dental Science. 
Charles M. Waldo, D.D.S., S.M., Associate Professor of Orthodontics. 
George E. Erikson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of General Education and 
Biology. 

In the Department of Anatomy, instruction is given in gross human anat- 
omy, histology, neurology, and embryology. Opportunities are also afforded 
for advanced work and investigation in these subjects. 

The department occupies the Morgan Anatomical Building, the dissecting 
rooms being in the wing designated B I, and the laboratories for histology 
and embryology in the wing B II. There are separate rooms for fourth year 
and graduate students and for various kinds of technical work. The class 
work is carried on by sections in unit rooms, designed to accommodate 
either twelve or twenty-four students. There is a large library which con- 
tains complete files of the most important anatomical and morphological 
journals, together with many standard works of reference, and in an adjoin- 
ing room there is a collection of about fifteen thousand pamphlets. A card 
catalogue and a classified bibliography give ready access to the literature. 

The embryological collection is a unique feature of the laboratory. It 
comprises about twenty-three hundred series of sections of carefully selected 
vertebrate embryos, and affords therefore opportunities for research in com- 
parative embryology such as cannot be found elsewhere. The collection in- 
cludes eighty series of sections of human embryos, several of which are of 
exceptional value, among them being two of the very youngest stages of man 
yet obtained. The collection of embryological models contains the standard 
series and many unique original models. 

Required Courses 

Anatomy A and B. First Year. — The courses of the first year are in- 
tended to teach human anatomy, both gross and microscopic, together with 
the essentials of human embryology and neurology. Half of the time is de- 
voted to work in the dissecting room, the other half to work in the histo- 
logical and embryological laboratories. 

In the study of gross anatomy, students make a complete dissection of one 



WMii m i mi \ i 01 001 RSI s 49 

hall of the huiIUUl body, Uld all of the class dissect; the same parr ar the same- 
time. PoUI Students will l>e assigned to the same subject, and will wor 

gether during the course. I he study of the skeleton is carried on with the 

dissection, and each Student will he provided with a ho\ of hones which mav 

he kept throughout the course. I here will he lectures or de m o n s tr ations 

which are arranged to correspond as closelv as possible with the work in the 
dissecting room. These lectures not only will serve as a guide to the regular 
work in the dissecting room, hut also will he used to emphasize those details 
of human anatomy which the student cannot easily Study for himself in his 
own dissection. Special dissections made by prosectors from the second 
class, frozen sections, and various anatomical specimens and preparations will 
he displayed each day to illustrate and supplement that part of the subject 
treated in the lecture, or about to be studied in the dissecting room. Stu- 
dents are urged to examine these specimens carefully, and to discuss them 
informally with the instructors. Students will be quizzed each week on their 
work in the laboratory by the instructors in charge of their section. 

The part of the course dealing with microscopic anatomy is designed to 
give the student a familiarity with the normal appearances of cells, tissues 
and organs. As much as is possible in a brief course, the development of 
tissues and organs is stressed. Opportunity 7 is also given to some extent for 
the study of fresh tissues. The use of fresh tissues is intended to acquaint the 
student with the structure of living cells and with evidence of cellular func- 
tions. Demonstrations are given from time to time to present the range of 
histological technique. 

The last five weeks of the course of microscopic anatomy are devoted to 
the study of the central nervous system. The student is given an opportu- 
nity to become familiar with the positions and relations of the principal 
nuclei and tracts of the nervous system bv the study of gross specimens and 
of serial sections through the brain stem. Emphasis is laid on the anatomico- 
physiological point of view. 

FIRST YEAR HOURS 

Lectures, Drs. Wislocki, Greep, Erickson, Singer, Deane, Edwards, Fawcett, 
Barrnett and Leduc. Six lectures a week, first half-year. 96 

Demonstrations. To sections of the class, at the pleasure of the instructors. 
Laboratory work. Twenty-nine hours a week, first half-year. 464 

Fourth Year Elective Courses 

1. Surgical Anatomy. Drs. Edwards and Fawcett. Whole course, one 
month. 
20. Investigation. Drs. Wislocki, Dempsey, Singer and Staff. Opportu- 
nities are offered for students who wish to do special or advanced work. 



50 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

Voluntary Courses 

jo. Clinical Applied Anatomy. Saturdays, 9 to 10 a.m., first half-year, 
P.B.B.H. and M.G.H. Open to first year students. (Same course as 
Surgery 31.) 

Physiology 

Eugene AI. Landis, M.D., Ph.D., S.Al. (hon.), George Higginson Professor 
of Physiology and Head of the Department. 

John R. Pappenhelmer, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

•Arthur K. Solomon, M.D., Assistant Professor of Physiological Chemistry. 

A. Clifford Barger, M.D., Associate in Physiology. 

Paul O. Chatfield, M.D., Associate in Physiology. 

Bruno Gunther, AI.D., Research Associate in Physiology. 

Paul A. Xicoll, Ph.D., Research Associate in Physiology, (resigned Sep- 
tember 30, 1950) 

Victor Richards, AI.D., Research Associate in Physiology. 

Ralph H. Kellogg, M.D., Instructor in Physiology. 

Edward P. Radford, Jr., M.D. Instructor in Physiology. 

Luis AI. Borrero, M.D., Research Fellow in Physiology, (resigned January 

31. 195O 
Alfred P. Fishman, AI.D., Research Fellow in Physiology. 
Robert E. Forster, 2D, M.D., Research Fellow in Physiology, (resigned Au- 
gust 31, 1950) 

Required Course 

Physiology A. First Year. — The lectures of this course are designed to 
acquaint the student with the more fundamental aspects of physiology and 
to consider in detail those portions of the subject that are essential to an 
understanding of the phenomena of health and disease in man. 

By means of laboratory exercises the student is introduced as rapidly as 
possible to the observational methods and techniques available for studying 
function in man. Then equal emphasis is placed upon exercises illustrating 
in animals the experimental procedures employed for the detailed analysis 
of function and for the acquisition of a fundamental knowledge of 
physiology. 

Conferences and demonstrations supplement the more formal instruction. 

first year 

hours 

Lectures and Laboratory work. Drs. Landis, Pappenhelmer, Chatfield, 

J; mi', and Kellogg. Three days a week, second half-year. 256 

intment under the Committee on Medical Research in Biophysics. 



\\\()l \( I Ml \ I <>l ( o( |(S| S 



Fourth Year Electivi I 



20. Physiological Investigation. Drs, I \mh'., Pappenheimer, Chatpield, 
Bargei ;ind Kellogg. Students will not ordinarily be received for less 

than CW0 months. 

Biophysical Chemistry 

Edwin J. Cohn, Ph.D., S.D. (hon.), M.D. (hon.)i Higgins University Pro- 
fessor and Director of the University Laboratory o\ Physical ( hevnstry 

Related to Medicine and Public Health. 
John I.. OncLEY, Ph.D., Professor 0] Physical Chemistry. 
John I. EoSALL, M.D., Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry anil 

Chairman of the Board <>\ Tutors in Biochemical Scien* 

WALTER L. Hughes, Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physical Chemistry. 
Barbara W. Low, Dr.Phii.., Assistant Professor of Physical Che mistr y. 
Douglas MacN. Surgenor, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physical Cberm 
FRANK R. N. Gurd, Ph.D., Instructor in Physical Chemistry and Tutor in 

Biochemical Sciences. 
Wai ikr B. Dandi.ikf.r, Ph.D., Research Associate in Physical Chemistry . 
.Margaret J. Hunter, Ph.D., Research Associate in Physical Chemistry and 

Tutor in Biochemical Sciences. 
Karl Schmid, Ph.D., Research Associate in Physical Chemistry. 
Philip E. Wilcox, Ph.D., Research Associate in Physical Chemistry and 

Tutor in Biochemical Sciences. 
Eva H. Ala.meri, A I. A., Ch.E., Research Fellow in Physical Chemistry. 
William H. Batchelor, AI.D., Research Fellow in Physical Chemistry. 
Ray K. Brown, M.D., Research Fellow in Physical Chemistry. 
Henri C. Isliker, Ph.D., Research Fellow in Physical Chemistry. 
David R. Kominz, MIX, Research Fellow in Physical Chemistry. 
Ariel G. Loewy, Ph.D., Research Fellow in Physical Chemistry . 
Herbert Morawetz, Ph.D., Research Fellow in Physical Chemistry. 
Richard B. Simpson, Ph.D., Research Fellow in Physical Choi:: 
Or.mond V. Brody, S.B., Teaching Fellow in Biophysical Cbemu 

The Department of Biophysical Chemistry (formerly the Department of 
Physical Chemistry) is the teaching department of the University Laboratory 
of Physical Chemistry Related to Medicine and Public Health. The De- 
partment is concerned with the physical chemistry of physiological systems 
and the characterization of their components, such as water, electrolytes, 
amino acids, peptides, phospholipids, proteins and lipoproteins in terms of 
physical constants defining their behavior. Special courses of investigation 
may be arranged to meet the needs of individual students. 



3- 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 



Fourth Year Elective Course 



20. Research in the Chemistry of Biological Substances and Systems. Drs. 
Cohn, Edsall, and Oncley. Investigation. Not less than one full 
course. 

Voluntary Course 

34. Advanced Biological Chemistrv. Physical Chemistry of Proteins and 
Other Biological Substances. Drs. Cohn, Edsall, Oncley, and Asso- 
ciates. Tuesday and Thursday afternoons throughout the year. Lecture 
and Laboratory work. 

Biological Chemistry 

Eric G. Ball, Ph.D., S.D. (hon.), Professor of Biological Chemistry. 

Cyrus H. Fiske, jM.D., Professor of Biological Chemistry. 

A. Baird Hastings, Ph.D., S.D. (hon.), Hamilton Kuhn Professor of Bio- 
logical Chemistry and Head of the Department. 

Fritz A. Lipmann, M.D., Dr.Phil., Professor of Biological Chemistry at the 
Massachusetts General Hosiptal. 

Jordi Folch-Pi, M.D., Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry at McLean 
Hospital (Massachusetts General Hospital). 

Ralph W. McKee, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry. 

•Arthur K. Solomon, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physiological Chem- 
istry. 

Harry C. Trimble, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry. 

Claude A. Villee, Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry 
and Tutor in the Preclinical Sciences. 

Manfred L. Karnovsky, Ph.D., Associate in Biological Chemistry . 

F. Lee Rodkey, Ph.D., Associate in Biological Chemistry. 

Mildred Cohn, Ph.D., Research Associate in Biological Chemistry. 

Lewis L. Engel, Ph.D., Research Associate in Biological Chemistry and in 
Medicine. 

Edward H. Frieden, Ph.D., Instructor in Biological Chemistry. 

Evan Calkins, M.D., Research Fellow in Biological Chemistry. 

Dante F. Campagna-Pinto, M.D., Research Fellow in Biological Chemistry. 

Jean C Roucayrol, M.D., Research Fellow in Biological Che?7iistry. 

Per V. Scholander, M.D., Ph.D., Special Research Fellow in Biological 
Chemistry. 

Isaac M. Taylor, M.D., Research Fellow in Biological Chemistry. 

* Appointment under the Committee on Medical Research in Biophysics. 



\\\oi \< I Ml \ I oi (Di RSI S 53 

Ching rn wc Ti wo, \l.l).. Research Fellow in Biological Chemistry. 

lii \ i wiin 1 1. \ mi*i K, s.li., / eat hing I ellow in Biological Chemistry, 
Jin II. Kinomim \, All., Teaching Fellow in Biological Chemistry. 
Corni i n a 1 . Su<n i m m n k, 4m, S.B., / caching Fellow in Biological Chem- 
istry. 

FsEDRICZ J. STARE, Ph.D., .M.D., I'rofessor of Nutrition. 

I). .Mark HeGSTED, Ph.D., Associate ProfeSSOT oj Nutrition. 

Required Course 

Biological Chemistry A. First Year. — The lectures in this course consist 
of a brief discussion of the theories of chemical constitution and a Survey of 
those classes of chemical substances which are to be found in animals :\nc] 
plants, and of the general principles and more important facts of physiologi- 
cal chemistry. 

The laboratory practice is designed to acquaint the student with some of 
the more important constituents of living matter and their chemical be- 
havior, and with some of the routine methods of biochemical investigation. 

Conferences and discussions of selected topics supplement the main work 
of the course. 

FIRST year HOURS 

Lectures and Laboratory work. Drs. Hastings, Ball, Stare, Hegsted, McKi 1 . 
Trimble, Villee, Karnoysky, Rodkey, and Assistants. Three times a 
week, second half-year. 23: 

Fourth Year Elective Course 
20. Research. Drs. Hastings, Ball, Lipmann, Stare, Folch-Pi, McKee, 
Trimble, Villee, Karnovsky, Rodkey, and Engel. Students who are 
especially interested in methods and problems of biological chemistry 
will be given opportunity to do advanced work. 

Voluntary Courses 

30. Advanced Biological Chemistry. Dr. Hastings. First semester. Time 
to be arranged. 

31. Clinical Nutrition. Dr. Stare and Associates. Time to be arranged. 

Bacteriology 

George Packer Berry, M.D., LL.D., D.Sc, Professor of Bacteriology and 

Dean of the Faculty of Medicine. 
J. PIoward Mueller, Ph.D., Charles Wilder Professor of Bacteriology and 

Immunology and Head of the Department. 



54 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

Monroe D. Eaton, M.D., Associate Professor of Bacteriology and Immunol- 
ogy- 

John F. Enders, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Bacteriology and Immunol- 
ogy. 

Albert H. Coons, M.D., Silas Arnold Houghton Assistant Professor of 
Bacteriology and Immunology. 

Robert A. MacCready, M.D., Associate in Bacteriology and Immunology. 

Louis L. Dienes, M.D., Lecturer on Bacteriology and Immunology. 

John H. Hanks, Ph.D., Lecturer on Bacteriology and Immunology. 

Clarke T. Gray, Ph.D., Research Associate in Bacteriology and Immunol- 
ogy. 

Telford G. Maple, Ph.D., Research Associate in Bacteriology and Im- 
munology. 

VVillard C. Schmidt, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology and Immunology . 

Barbara K. Watson, Ph.D., Instructor in Bacteriology and Immunology. 

H. Edwin Umbarger, Ph.D., Instructor in Bacteriology and Immunology. 

Boris Magasanik, Ph.D., Harold C. Ernst Fellow in Bacteriology and Im- 
munology. 

S. Stephen Chapman, A.M., Research Fellow in Bacteriology and Immunol- 
ogy. 

Paul D. Hoeprich, M.D., Research Fellow in Bacteriology and Immunology. 

Alexander Kohn, Ph.D., Research Fellow in Bacteriology and Immunology. 

Marian E. Koshland, Ph.D., Research Fellow in Bacteriology and Immunol- 
ogy. 

Jonathan B. Wittenberg, Ph.D., Research Fellow in Bacteriology and Im- 
munology. 

Lawrence J. Kunz, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Bacteriology and Immunology. 

Darrell B. Pratt, S.M., Teaching Fellow in Bacteriology and Immunology. 



Fritz A. Lipmann, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Biological Chemistry at the 

Massachusetts General Hospital. 
John C. Snyder, M.D., Professor of Public Health Bacteriology. 
Charles K. Osgood, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

The personnel and equipment of the Department of Bacteriology are pre- 
pared to supply instruction and opportunities for investigation to properly 
qualified undergraduate and graduate students in general bacteriology, 
pathogenic bacteriology, and the problems of immunity. 

Required Course 
Bacteriology A. Second Year. — The required course for medical stu- 
dents is taught by lectures, laboratory work, and conferences. Stress in this 
course is laid upon those parts of bacteriology and immunology which are 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES $$ 

directly pertinent to the pathology of infectious disease, its practical diag- 
nosis and treatment. The students are introduced as rapidly as possible to 
the medical problems of bacteriology, and the subjects taught are illustrated 
by material obtained from the associated hospitals. Immunological and 
seriological technic in its practical aspects is dealt with by group instruction, 
and the preventive aspects of the physician's duties in relation to infectious 
diseases are considered as thoroughly as time permits. 

Second Year hours 

Lectures. Drs. Mueller, Eaton, Coons, and Staff. Mondays, Wednes- 
days, and Fridays, first half-year. 48 
Laboratory work. Drs. Mueller, Eaton, Coons, and Staff. Two hours, 
Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, first half-year. 96 

Fourth Year Elective Course 

20. Research. The Department of Bacteriology offers opportunity for 
special studv for one or more months. Students will be accepted for such 
work and the nature of their studies will be determined by individual 
conferences between the applicants and members of the staff of the 
department. 

Voluntary Courses 

30. Research. Opportunity for research will be given to qualified students 

upon consultation with members of the staff. 
32. Immunity and Serology. Dr. Coons and Staff. Seminars and laboratory 

work. Time to be arranged. Open to second, third, and fourth year 

students and graduates. 
33a. Applied Immunology (Serums and Vaccines). Massachusetts State 

Antitoxin Laboratory. Limited to a few properly qualified students. 

Application should be made at the office of the Department. 
lib. Clinical Bacteriology. Tuesdays and Thursdays. B.C.H. Limited to a 

few students from the third and fourth year classes and will not be given 

for less than four. Application and arrangements must be made in 

advance. 
34. Viruses. Dr. Eaton. Time to be arranged. Open to third and fourth 

year students. Limited to ten students. 

Pathology 

Sidney Farber, M.D., Professor of Pathology at the Children's Hospital. 
Arthur T. Hertig, M.D., Professor of Pathology at the Boston Lying-in 

Hospital and at the Free Hospital for Women and Acting Head of the 

Department. 



$6 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

Tracy B. Mallory, M.D., Professor of Pathology at the Massachusetts 

General Hospital. 
Shields Warren, M.D., Professor of Pathology at the New England 

Deaconess Hospital. 
Frederic Parker, Jr., M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology. 
Orville T. Bailey, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
Benjamin Castleman, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology at the Massa- 
chusetts General Hospital. 
Monroe J. Schlesinger, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology at the Beth 

Israel Hospital. 
Samuel P. Hicks, M.D., Associate in Pathology at the New England 

Deaconess Hospital. 
William A. Meissner, M.D., Associate in Pathology at the New England 

Deaconess Hospital. 
Elkan R. Blout, Ph.D., Research Associate in Pathology. 
Olive Gates, M.D., Research Associate in Pathology. 
James W. Goddard, M.D., Research Associate in Pathology. 
Thomas L. Linn, M.B.Ch.B., Research Associate in Pathology. 
Joseph D. Boggs, M.D., Instructor in Pathology, (resigned September i, 1950) 
David L. Coffin, M.D.V., Instructor in Pathology. 
Bradley E. Copeland, ALD., Instructor in Pathology. 
John M. Craig, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
Israel Diamond, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
Lloyd C. Fogg, Ph.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
Betty B. Geren, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
J. Peter Kulka, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
Benjamin H. Landing, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
Philip M. LeCompte, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
Jane C. MaciMillan, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
G. Kenneth Mallory, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
Donald G. McKay, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
Maurice M. Pechet, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
Oscar Rambo, M.D., Instructor in Pathology, (resigned August 1, 1950) 
Leopold Reiner, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
Stanley L. Robbins, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
Reuben Z. Schulz, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
Robert E. Scully, M.D., Instructor in Pathology, (resigned September 1, 

1950) 
Ronald C. Sniffen, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
Sheldon C. Sommers, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
Luftu L. Uzman, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
Austin L. Vickery, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 57 

Donald E. Brown, M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 
Rivka Ashbel, D.Sc, Research Fellow in Pathology. 
Virgil R. Bleisch, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Pathology. 
George W. Curtis, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Pathology. 
John P. Decker, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Pathology. 
Joshua LeR. Edwards, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Pathology. 
David H. Hausman, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Pathology. 
William Jaques, j\1.D., Teaching Fellow in Pathology. 
James A. Merrill, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Pathology. 



Edgar B. Taft, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Required Course 

Pathology A. Second Year. — The second year course in pathology 
is planned as a systematic survey of pathology. It consists of lectures, lab- 
oratory study of pathologic histology and demonstrations of gross patho- 
logic material, partly from fixed specimens drawn from the Warren 
Museum, but more extensively from demonstrations of fresh autopsy and 
surgical material in the laboratories of the affiliated hospitals. Students visit 
in rotation the Pathology Laboratories of the Boston City Hospital, Massa- 
chusetts General Hospital, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Children's Hos- 
pital, Beth Israel Hospital, the Free Hospital for Women and the New 
England Deaconess Hospital. 

Lectures are given three days in the week by the staff. The course is 
divided roughly, though not sharply, into general and special pathology, 
covering in the first part of the year basic pathologic processes, such as 
tissue injury and repair, inflammation, tissue responses to specific infectious 
agents and neoplasia. In the second half of the course the diseases of 
the important organs and systems are considered in some detail. The 
pathology of the eye is covered in collaboration with the Department of 
Ophthalmology. 

Courses in Parasitology and Neuropathology are given separately by the 
respective departments but under the nominal jurisdiction of this Depart- 
ment. The course in Clinical Pathology is under the direction of the De- 
partment of Medicine. 

SECOND YEAR HOURS 

Lectures, Dr. Hertig and Staff. Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 
for twenty-six weeks. 78 

Laboratory work. Dr. Hertig and Staff. Two and a half hours, Mondays, 
Wednesdays, and Fridays. 195 



58 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

Fourth Year Elective Courses 

1. Advanced Pathology. Dr. T. B. Mallory. M.G.H. Whole course, all 
day, or half-course, afternoons, first half-year. 

2. Advanced Pathology. Dr. Parker. B.C.H. Whole course, all day, for 
one or more months during the school year. 

4. The Pathology of the Endocrine Diseases. Dr. S. Warren. N.E.D.H. 
Whole course, all day, offered throughout the school year. 

5. The Pathology of Tumors. Dr. S. Warren. N.E.D.H. Whole course, 
all day, for one or more months during the school year. 

7. Advanced Pathology. Dr. S. Farber. C.H. Whole course, all day, for 
one or more months during the school year. 

8. Advanced Pathology. Dr. M. J. Schlesinger. B.I.H. Whole course, all 
day, for one or more months during the school year. 

Tropical Public Health 

The following course is given by members of the Faculty of the Harvard 
School of Public Health. 

Donald L. Augustine, S.D., S.D. (hon.), Professor of Tropical Public 

Health and Executive Head of the Department. 
Quentin M. Geiman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Tropical Public Health. 
Thomas H. Weller, M.D., Associate Professor of Tropical Public Health. 
Albert A. Hornor, M.D., Instructor in Tropical Public Health. 
Ruth A. Thomas, M.P.H., Instructor in Tropical Public Health. 
Doris Y. M. Hsu, Ph.D., Research Fellow in Tropical Public Health. 
Earl S. Wicks, S.M., Research Fellow in Tropical Public Health. 

Required Course 

Parasitology A. Second Year. — The important helminth and protozoan 
parasites of man are considered with reference to their geographic distribu- 
tion, identification, mode of transmission, pathogenesis, immune reactions 
and methods for prevention and control. Clinical aspects and chemotherapy 
of parasitic diseases are discussed. Emphasis is given to methods of labora- 
tory diagnosis. Arthropods of parasitological importance are briefly sur- 
veyed with special consideration of insects related to human disease. 

second year hours 

Lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory work. Dr. Augustine and 
Staff. H.M.S. Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, 10 to 1, No- 
vember 28-December 21. 30 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 59 

Fourth Year Elective Course 

20. Research in protozoology, helminthology, medical entomology and 
tropical medicine, may be arranged for qualified students. Dr. Augus- 
tine and Staff. 

Pharmacology 

Otto Krayer, M.D., Associate Professor of Comparative Pharmacology and 
Head of the Department. 

Avram Goldstein, M.D., Associate in Pharmacology. 

Douglas S. Riggs, M.D., Associate in Pharmacology. 

Frederick C. Uhle, Ph.D., Research Associate in Pharmacology. 

Albert Wollenberger, Ph.D., Research Associate in Pharmacology. 

Edward A. Carr, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Pharmacology. 

Dale G. Friend, M.D., Instructor in Pharmacology . 

Arthur J. Linenthal, M.D., Instructor in Pharmacology and Medicine. 

Juan J. Mandoki, At.D., Research Fellow in Pharmacology. 

Paula Ourisson, i\l.D., Research Fellow in Pharmacology. 

Ernesto, Sodi-Pallares, D.S., Research Fellow in Pharmacology. 

Eric A. Wright, M.B., B.Surg., Research Fellow in Pharmacology. 

Margaret Wright, S.B., Research Fellow in Pharmacology. 

Henry K. Beecher, M.D., Henry Isaiah Dorr Professor of Research in An- 
aesthesia. 

Required Course 
Pharmacology A. Second Year. — The course in Pharmacology consists of 
lectures, demonstrations, experimental laboratory exercises and conferences. 
The students have an opportunity to learn about the fundamental pharma- 
cological and toxicological concepts and to become acquainted with the 
important drugs. Emphasis is placed on the mode of action of pharmaco- 
logical agents in such a way as to provide the student with a rational basis 
for the study of therapeutics with drugs. The analysis of pharmacological 
effects is based on experimental and clinical facts obtained from studies in 
man and animals. In the laboratory, stress is laid on observation and inter- 
pretation by the student. 

SECOND YEAR HOURS 

Lectures. Dr. Krayer and Staff. One hour, three times a week: Tues- 
days, Thursdays and Saturdays, first half-year; Mondays, Wednes- 
days and Fridays, second half-year. 84 

Laboratory work and Conferences. Dr. Krayer and Staff. Three hours 
alternating for half the class. 58 

Fourth Year Elective Courses 
20. Research in Pharmacology. 
20a. Substances affecting the circulatory system. Dr. Krayer. 



60 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

20b. Substances affecting the autonomic nervous system. Dr. Krayer. 
20C. Substances affecting the endocrine organs. Dr. Riggs. 
2od. Problems in chemotherapy. Dr. Goldstein. 

Legal Medicine 

Richard Ford, M.D., Assistant Professor of Legal Medicine and Acting 

Head of the Department. 
Orville T. Bailey, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology, Consultant in 

General Pathology to Department of Legal Medicine. 
Joseph T. Walker, Ph.D., Associate in Legal Medicine. 
Michael A. Luongo, M.D., Instructor in Legal Medicine. 
Lester Adelson, M.D., Research Fellow in Legal Medicine, (resigned 

August 31, 1950) 
Gilbert Forbes, M.B., Ch.B., Research Fellow in Legal Medicine. 
Bruce D. Harrold, iM.D., Research Fellow in Legal Medicine. 
John H. Mickley, M.D., Research Fellow in Legal Medicine. 
James R. Teabeaut, id, M.D., Research Fellow in Legal Medicine. 
Woodrow W. Weiss, M.D., Research Fellow in Legal Medicine. 

Required Course 

Third Year. — Twelve lectures. The circumstances in which medical evi- 
dence is essential to the administration of justice. Mechanisms and patho- 
logical characteristics of injuries most frequently responsible for litigation. 
Laws and legal principles relating to the practice of medicine and to the 
settlement of malpractice claims. 

third year hours 

Lectures. Dr. Ford and Staff. H.M.S. Twelve Fridays of the first half- 
year, at 4.15 p.m. 12 

Medicine 

Under this Division are included Medicine and the specialties relating 
chiefly to Medicine: — Dermatology, Diseases of the Nervous System 
(Neurology, Neuropathology, and Psychiatry), Ophthalmology, and 
Radiology. 

MEDICINE 

Joseph C. Alb, M.D., Professor of Research Medicine and Director of the 
Medical Laboratories of the Collis P. Huntington Memorial Hospital 
and Chairman of the Depart?nent. 

Herrman L. Blumgart, M.D., Professor of Medicine and Head of the 
Department at the Beth Israel Hospital. 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 6 1 

C. Sidney Burwell, M.D., LL.D., Research Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

William B. Castle, M.D., S.M. (hon.), MX), (hon.), Professor of Medicine 
and Head of the Department at the Boston City Hospital. 

James H. Means, M.D., Jackson Professor of Clinical Medicine and Head 
of the Department at the Massachusetts General Hospital. 

George W. Thorn, M.D., Hersey Professor of the Theory and Practice 
of Physic and Head of the Department at the Peter Bent Brigham 
Hospital. 

Fuller Albright, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Walter Bauer, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Maxwell Finland, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Chester M. Jones, M.D., S.D. (hon.), Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Samuel A. Levine, M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Benjamin Alexander, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Beth 
Israel Hospital. 

Mark D. Altschule, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine at the McLean 
Hospital (M.G.H.) and at the Beth Israel Hospital. 

Charles S. Davidson, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

Lewis Dexter, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine and Tutor in Medi- 
cine. 

Laurence B. Ellis, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Kendall Emerson, Jr., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

Eugene C. Eppinger, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

A. Stone Freedberg, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

Samuel L. Gargill, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Seymour J. Gray, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

Henry Jackson, Jr., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

Marian W. Ropes, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Arthur L. Watkins, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Paul C. Zamecnik, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Massachu- 
setts General Hospital. 

F. Dennette Adams, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Theodore L. Badger, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Benjamin M. Banks, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Theodore B. Bayles, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Edward F. Bland, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Earle M. Chapman, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Perry J. Culver, M.D., Associate in Medicine at the Massachusetts Ge?ieral 
Hospital. 

Lowrey F. Davenport, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Clifford L. Derick, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Harry A. Derow, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 



6l THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

Cutting B. Favour, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

Clark W. Heath, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 

Francis T. Hunter, Associate in Medicine at the Massachusetts General 

Hospital. 
David Hurwitz, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 
Jacob Lerman, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 
Harold D. Levine, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 
Alexander Marble, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 
F. William Marlow, Jr., M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 
Dudley Merrill, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 
Robert T. Monroe, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 
Joseph E. F. Riseman, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 
Howard F. Root, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 
Howard B. Sprague, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 
John B. Staxbury, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 
Richard P. Stetson, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 
Maurice B. Strauss, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 
F. H. Laskey Taylor, Ph.D., Associate in Research Medicine. 
Louis Wolff, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 
Louis Zetzel, M.D., Clinical Associate in Medicine. 
Paul M. Zoll, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 
Reginald Fitz, M.D., Lecturer on the History of Medicine and Assistant 

Dean. 
T. Duckett Jones, M.D., Lecturer on Medicine. 
William P. Murphy, M.D., Lecturer on Medicine. 
James P. O'Hare, M.D., Lecturer on Medicine. 
Gordon L. Brownell, Ph.D., Research Associate in Medicine. 
Lewis L. Engel, Ph.D., Research Associate in Medicine and in Biological 

Chemistry. 
John G. Gibson, 2nd, M.D., Research Associate in Medicine. 
Jerome Gross, M.D., Research Associate in Medicine. 
Florence W. Haynes, Ph.D., Research Associate in Medicine. 
Robert B. Loftfield, Ph.D., Research Associate in Medicine. 
Wilson R. Slaunwhite, Jr., Ph.D., Research Associate in Medicine. 
Dorothy M. Tibbetts, S.B., Research Associate in Medicine. 
Bert L. Vallee, M.D., Research Associate in Medicine. 
Norman Zamcheck, M.D., Research Associate in Medicine. 
C. Cabell Bailey, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Samuel B. Beaser, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Richard A. Bloomfield, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Morton G. Brown, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 63 

Robert E. Brownlee, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Nancy L. R. Bucher, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Walter S. Burrage, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Thomas C. Chalmers, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
William P. Chapman, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
William S. Clark, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Mandel E. Cohen, M.D., Instructor in Medicine and in Neurology. 
Sidney Cohen, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Andrew W. Contratto, M.D., Instructor in Medicine and Physician, Depart- 
ment of Hygiene. 
Greene Fitzhugh, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Peter H. Forsham, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Ivan D. Frantz, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Frank H. Gardner, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Bernard M. Jacobson, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Stanley Kimball, MX)., Instructor in Medicine. 
Mark F. Lesses, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Arthur J. Linenthal, M.D., Instructor in Medicine and Pharmacology. 
Arthur J. Lockhart, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
George W. Lynch, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Donald J. MacPherson, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
James S. Mansfield, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
L. Tillman McDaniel, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Sylvester McGinn, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Edward Meilman, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
John P. Merrill, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
John P. Monks, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Carey M. Peters, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Helen S. Pittman, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Curtis Prout, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Gordon A. Saunders, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Jesse F. Scott, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Albert O. Seeler, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Charles L. Short, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
James S. Stillman, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Thomas A. Warthin, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
John W. Zeller, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
John B. G. Andosca, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Victor G. Balboni, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Robert E. Barkin, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Frederic C. Bartter, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 



64 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

Robert L. Berg, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Kenneth T. Bird, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Robert Buka, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Donald T. Chamberlin, AID., Assistant in Medicine. 

Joaquin G. Cigarroa, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Jack D. Cohen, Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Ernest Craige, Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Seth C. Crocker, Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

James H. Currens, Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Thomas R. Dawber, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Briant L. Decker, Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Albert I. C. DeFriez, Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Daniel S. Ellis, Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

John Al. Flynn, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Anne P. Forbes, Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Paul Fremont-Smith, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Robert Goldstein, Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Walter T. Goodale, Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

John R. Graham, Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

AIahlon B. Hoagland, Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

James H. Jackson, Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Alfred Kranes, Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

George S. Kurland, Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Farahe AIaloof, Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Gordon S. AIyers, Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Hyman L. Naterman, Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

John C. Nemiah, Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Charles K. Osgood, Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

John F. Otto, Jr., Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Tom F. Paine, Jr., Assistant in Medicine. 

Arthur S. Pier, Jr., Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

George M. Pike, Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Robert W. Reifenstein, Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Elliot L. Sagall, Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Samuel Stearns, Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Harold J. Stein, Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

AIelvin I. Sturnick, Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Robert H. Talkov, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Joseph L. Tansey, Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Frank E. Trobaugh, Jr., Al.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

\ I ass \V\im , MX)., Assistant in Medicine, (resigned August 13, 1950) 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 6$ 

Charles F. Walcott, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Joseph E. Warren, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

John M. Weller, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Stanford Wessler, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Edwin O. Wheeler, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Conger Williams, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Charles R. Williamson, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

William H. Baker, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

John A. Benson, M.D., John White Browne Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Frederick S. Bigelow, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Joseph A. Blais, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Douglas Booking, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Edward S. Buckley, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Edmund J. Callahan, 3D, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Robert V. Coxon, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Modestino G. Criscitiello, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

David W. Cugell, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Willard Dalrymple, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

James B. Dealy, Jr., M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Jane F. Desforges, M.D., Louis W . Gilbert Research Fellow in Medicine. 

James F. Dickson, 3d, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Charles H. DuToit, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

John T. Finkenstaedt, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Nathan R. Frank, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Thomas F. Frawley, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Donald S. Fredrickson, M.D., James Jackson Cabot Research Fellow in 

Medicine. 
Arthur B. French, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 
George J. Gabuzda, M.D., Jeffrey Richardson Research Fellow in Medicine. 
Edward A. Gaenzler, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 
Richard Gorlin, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 
Thomas H. Haight, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 
Thomas C. Hall, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 
John W. Harris, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 
Erwin O. Hirsch, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicme. 
Mark Horwitz, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 
Sidney H. Ingbar, M.D., Edward Hickling Bradford Research Fellow in 

Medicine. 
George G. Jackson, M.D., Special Research Fellow in Medicine. 
Anthony H. James, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 
D alton Jenkins, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 
Edward H. Kass, iM.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 



66 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

Elizabeth B. Keller, Ph.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Rita M. Kelley, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Greta Landwehr, S.B., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Alexander Leaf, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Joseph E. Levinson, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Benjamin j\1. Lewis, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Allyn B. Ley, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Bernard Lown, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

James Metcalfe, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Hugo W. Moser, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Alex F. Muller, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

William P. Murphy, Jr., M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Leona R. Norman, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Solomon Papper, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Gerald B. Phillips, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Henrique B. Pinto, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine, (resigned Decem- 
ber 31, 1950) 

Walter W. Point, 3D, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Carola B. Purdy, Dr. Med., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Albert E. Renold, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Lester Rich, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

John W. Runyan, Jr., M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Robert F. Schilling, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine, (resigned Janu- 
ary 6, 195 1 ) 

Philip Siekevltz, Ph.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Leonard B. Spector, Ph.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Norman S. Stearns, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Kenneth Sterling, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Roy C. Swan, Jr., M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Edgar B. Taft, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Lester H. Tobin, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Henrik O. Tonning, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Ralph O. Wallerstein, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Donald M. Watkin, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Donald L. Wilson, M.D.C.M., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Leonard Wolsky, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Charles R. Womack, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

John W. Woodbury, M.D., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

John C. G. Young, M.D.C.M., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

Walter H. Abelmann, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Medicine. 

William H. Birchard, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Medicine. 

Stanley W. Daum, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Medicine. 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 6j 

Milton W. Hamolsky, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Medicine, (resigned De- 
cember 31, 1950) 

Aubrey R. Harris, iM.D., Teaching Fellow in Medicine. 

Albert F. Hendler, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Medicine. 

Norio Higano, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Medicine. 

Elmer E. Hinton, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Medicine. 

James H. Jandl, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Medicine, (resigned October 15, 
1950) 

J. Bradley Long, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Medicine. 

William M. Madison, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Medicine, (resigned Octo- 
ber 15, 1950) 

Brian H. McCracken, AID., Teaching Fellow in Medicine. 

Karl D. Nelson, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Medicine. 

Donald Oken, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Medicine. 

John Reynolds, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Medicine. 

David H. Solomon, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Medicine. 

Howard M. Spiro, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Medicine. 

John N. Swanson, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Medicine. 

Alvin L. Ureles, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Medicine. 

John H. Vaughan, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Medicine. 

John W. Vester, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Medicine. 



Benedict F. Massell, M.D., Clinical Associate in Pediatrics. 

Required Courses 

The instruction given by the Department of Medicine consists in lectures, 
recitations, amphitheatre clinics, practical work in the out-patient depart- 
ments and wards of the hospitals, and a course in laboratory diagnosis which 
is given at the Harvard Medical School in the laboratory of the Department. 
Throughout, an effort is made to correlate the clinical aspects of patients 
with fundamental principles derived from the basic sciences and to establish 
in the student's mind the importance of care and precision in diagnostic and 
therapeutic methods. The time given to the Department of Medicine begins 
in the second half of the second year and continues throughout the third and 
fourth years of the medical curriculum. 

Second Year. — During the second half of the second year introductory 
aspects of internal medicine are covered in a correlated program of lectures 
and demonstrations in the courses in physical diagnosis and laboratory 
diagnosis. The application of the subject matter of preclinical courses to 
clinical medicine is emphasized. For their practical instruction in the meth- 
ods of history taking, physical examination, and laboratory technique the 
students are divided into small groups. 

Third Year. — Throughout the third year the subjects of internal medicine 



68 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

are covered by clinics or lectures for the whole class, which are given at the 
various hospitals or at the Harvard Medical School. For their practical in- 
struction the students are divided into small groups and work in the medical 
wards or out-patient departments of the four larger hospitals connected with 
the Medical School. On Monday and Wednesday afternoons the third of 
the class assigned to Medicine attends amphitheatre clinics, clinical-patho- 
logical conferences, and x-ray conferences in rotation at the various hospitals. 
Fourth Year. — In this year for two or three months the students serve 
mainly as clinical clerks in the medical wards of a general hospital. Part of 
their time, however, is devoted to acting as assistants in the medical clinic of 
the out-patient department. Especial emphasis is placed upon the care of the 
patient as an individual with respect to diagnosis and treatment. With indi- 
vidual variations in the different hospitals, conferences are held for the in- 
formal discussion of clinical, pathological, immunological, radiological, so- 
cial or dietetic problems of selected cases. 

Elective and Voluntary Courses 

In addition to the required courses for fourth year students the depart- 
ment offers several opportunities for specially qualified students to take ad- 
vanced elective courses and to carry on research problems in internal medi- 
cine. 

Facilities for Instruction 

The instruction is given at the Harvard Medical School, the Massachusetts 
General Hospital, the Boston City Hospital, the Peter Bent Brigham Hospi- 
tal, the Beth Israel Hospital and several other hospitals devoted to special 
purposes. In these hospitals abundant and varied clinical material is available 
for the conduct of the numerous exercises. 

SECOND YEAR HOURS 

Lectures and demonstrations on physical diagnosis and introductory 
aspects of clinical medicine. Dr. Altschule and Associates. Four 
times a week. 61 

Section teaching in physical diagnosis and history taking. Dr. Altschule 
and Assistants. M.G.H., B.C.H., P.B.B.H., B.I.H., and H.G.S. 
Each student has twenty -four exercises. 84 

Lectures and practical exercises in laboratory diagnosis. Dr. Culver 
and Assistants. H.M.S. Three times a week. 96 

THIRD year 

Lectures, recitations, and clinics on selected topics in internal medicine. 
Drs. Means, Castle, Thorn, Aub, Blumgart, and Associates. 
Throughout the year. 64 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 69 

Exercises in sections in the wards and out-patient departments at the 
M.G.H., B.C.H., P.B.B.H., and B.I.H. Each section has thirty-two 
exercises of two and a half hours each and twenty-one exercises of 
three hours each. 143 

FOURTH YEAR 

Clinical Clerkships at M.G.H. (Medicine Ci, Dr. Means and Asso- 
ciates); B.C.H. (Medicine C2, Drs. Castle, Davidson, and Asso- 
ciates); P.B.B.H. (Medicine C3, Dr. Thorn and Associates); B.I.H. 
(Aledicine C4, Dr. Blumgart and Associates). 288 

Fourth Year Elective Courses 

5. Advanced Medicine. Dr. Means and Associates. M.G.H. 

6. Advanced Medicine. Drs. Castle, Davidson, Ellis, Finland, Jackson, 
and Associates. B.C.H. 

7. Advanced Medicine. Dr. Thorn and Associates. P.B.B.H. 

8. Advanced Medicine. Dr. Blumgart and Associates. B.I.H. 

9. Advanced Medicine. Diabetes. Dr. Root and Associates. N.E.D.H. 

10. Advanced Medicine. Neoplastic Disease. Drs. Aub, Castleman, 
Nathanson, Robbins, and Associates. M.G.H. 

11. Syphilology. Drs. Frazier, Hill and Associates. M.G.H. 

12. Advanced Medicine. Diseases of the Lungs. Dr. Davenport and Asso- 
ciates. M.G.H., B.C.H., and P.B.B.H. 

13. Research Medicine. Drs. Means, Stanbury, and Associates, M.G.H. 

Voluntary Courses 

30. Clinical Medicine. Opportunities for experience in clinical investigation 
will be given at the B.C.H. to a limited number of properly qualified 
students. Individual arrangements should be made by personal applica- 
tion to Dr. Castle. 

3 1 . Diseases of the Digestive System. Drs. Banks and Zetzel. Tuesdays and 
Thursdays, 2 to 3.30 p.m. (4 weeks) B.I.H. Open to third year students. 

33. Infectious Diseases. Clinics and bedside demonstrations. P.B.B.H., 
B.I.H., and C.M.C. Tuesdays, 2 to 4 p.m., November through January. 
Open to second year students. 

34. Diseases of the Thyroid. Drs. Gargill and Lesses. Tuesdays, 3.30 to 
5 p.m., March and April, B.I.H. Open to second, third and fourth 
year students. 

36. Hypertensive Disease and Nephritis. Dr. Derow. Tuesdays, 2 to 
3.30 p.m., December and January, B.I.H. Open to third year students. 

37. Diagnosis and Treatment of Heart Diseases. Drs. Altschule and Rise- 
man. Tuesdays, 2 to 3.30 p.m., February and March, B.I.H. Open to 
second and third year students. 



70 THE xMEDICAL SCHOOL 

38. Clinical Electrocardiography. Dr. Harold D. Levine. February and 
March, Thursdays, 4 to 5.30 p.m. P.B.B.H. Open to third and fourth 
year students. 

39. Diabetes. Dr. Beaser. Tuesdays and Thursdays, 2 to 3.30 p.m., 
April, B.I.H. 

40. Clinical Application of Physiological Principles. Dr. Blumgart and 
Associates. Time and titles of clinics to be announced. B.I.H. Open 
to first year students during the second half-year. 

42. Clinical Applications of Pharmacology. Drs. Blumgart, Linenthal 
and Associates. November through May, every other Thursday, 2 to 
3.30 p.m. H.M.S. Open to second year students. 

Dermatology 

Chester N. Frazier, M.D., Dr.P.H., Edward Wigglesworth Professor of 
Dermatology and Head of the Department. 

Jacob H. Swartz, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Dermatology. 

Irvin H. Blank, Ph.D., Research Associate in Dermatology. 

Ruth C. Burke, Ph.D., Research Associate in Dermatology. 

Alexander G. Matoltsy, M.D., Research Associate in Dermatology . 

John Adams, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Dermatology. 

G. Marshall Crawford, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology. 

William R. Hill, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Dermatology. 

Walter F. Lever, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology. 

Maurice M. Tolman, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology. 

Robert D. Griesemer, M.D., Research Fellow in Dermatology. 

Roy W. Leeper, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Derviatology. (resigned Decem- 
ber 15, 1950) 

Required Courses 

Third Year. — In the first halfryear five lectures are given in the funda- 
mentals of dermatology. The object is to present the essential principles 
underlying the production of cutaneous abnormalities and to identify and 
relate these changes, both functional and structural, to the processes of 
disease in general. The subject is considered not as an isolated area of 
medicine, but as an integral part of medicine itself. It is hoped that through 
this method of study the student may come to understand the unity of 
the individual in his response to the various pathogenic forces of nature. 

The student serves also as a clerk in the out-patient clinic and in the 
wards, where he studies and discusses with the staff, patients assigned to 
him. Emphasis is placed upon history-taking and physical examination of 
patients in such a way as to make the student aware that the diseases 
which he observes require, in general, the techniques of clinical medicine 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 7 I 

for their study and interpretation. Rational methods of treatment are 
insisted upon. 
The students, in sections, attend morning ward rounds. 

THIRD YEAR HOURS 

Lectures. Dr. Frazier. H.M.S. Five lectures, first half-year. 5 

Section work. Clinical Dermatology. Drs. Frazier, Swartz, Adams, 

Crawford, Hill, Lever and Tolman. M.G.H. Each student 

attends ten or eleven sessions (climes and ward rounds) of three 

hours each. 32 

Fourth Year Elective Courses 

1. Clinical Clerkship. Dr. Frazier and Assistants. M.G.H. Whole 
course, all day, time to be arranged with Head of Department. 

2. Clinical Dermatology. Dr. Frazier and Assistants. M.G.H. Half- 
course, mornings, monthly, throughout the year. 

Neurology and Psychiatry 

This department is composed of three divisions: — 

1. Neurology, Dr. Denny-Brown, at the Boston City Hospital and Dr. 
Kubik at the Massachusetts General Hospital. (Dr. Crothers and Dr. 
Lennox at the Children's Hospital, in association with the Department 
of Pediatrics, will give instruction in nervous diseases of children.) 

2. Neuropathology, Dr. Cobb, Harvard Medical School. 

3. Psychiatry, Dr. Solomon, Boston Psychopathic Hospital. 

Stanley Cobb, M.D., Bullard Professor of Neuropathology and Head of the 

Department of Psychiatry at the Massachusetts General Hospital and 

Chairman of the Department. 

Derek E. Denny-Brown, Dr.Phil., M.D., F.R.C.P., James Jackson Putnam 
Professor of Neurology and Head of the Department at the Boston City 
Hospital. 

Harry C. Solomon, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry and Head of the Depart- 
ment at the Boston Psychopathic Hospital. 

Charles S. Kubik, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Neurology and 
Head of the Department at the Massachusetts General Hospital. 

William G. Lennox, M.D., S.D., Associate Professor of Neurology. 

Erich Lindemann, M.D., Associate Professor in Mental Health. 

Raymond DeL. Adams, M.D., Assistant Professor of Neurology. 

Henry M. Fox, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the Peter Bent 
Brigham Hospital. 

Ives Hendrick, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry. 



72 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

Grete L. Bibring, M.D., Associate in Psychiatry at the Beth Israel Hospital. 

Wilfred Bloomberg, M.D., Clinical Associate in Neurology. 

G. Colket Caner, M.D., Clinical Associate in Neurology. 

Gaylord P. Coon, M.D. Clinical Associate in Psychiatry and Psychiatrist to 
the Department of Hygiene. 

Frank C. d'Elseaux, M.D., Clinical Associate in Psychiatry. 

.Milton Greenblatt, M.D., Clinical Associate in Psychiatry. 

William L. Holt, M.D., Associate in Psychiatry at the Boston Psychopathic 
Hospital. 

Harry L. Kozol, M.D., Clinical Associate in Neurology. 

Merrill Moore, M.D., Clinical Associate in Psychiatry. 

Robert S. Schwab, M.D., Associate in Neurology at the Massachusetts Gen- 
eral Hospital. 

Lawrence D. Trevett, M.D., Clinical Associate in Psychiatry. 

George E. Gardner, jM.D., Lecturer on Clinical Psychology. 

Marian C. Putnam, M.D., Lecturer on Psychiatry. 

Henry R. Viets, M.D., Lecturer on Neurology. 

John R. Reid, Ph.D., Visiting Lecturer on Psychiatry. 

Mary A. B. Brazier, Ph.D., Research Associate in Neuropathology. 

Byron H. Waksman, M.D., Research Associate in Neuropathology. 

John A. Abbott, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 

Charles R. Atwell, A.M., Instructor in Psychology. 

Herbert Barry, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 

Clemens E. Benda, M.D., Instructor in Neuropathology. 

Leo Berman, .M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 

Madelaine R. Brown, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 

Florence Clothier, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 

Manuel E. Cohen, M.D., Instructor in Neurology and in Medicine. 

Edwin M. Cole, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 

Herbert J. DeShon, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 

Thomas F. Dwyer, AID., Instructor in Psychiatry. 

Samuel H. Epstein, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 

Robert E. Fleming, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 

Joseph M. Foley, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 

Gertrude R. Greenblatt, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 

A. Price Heusner, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 

Pali. M. Howard, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 

Lucie V Jessner, MX)., Instructor in Psychiatry. 

Maxwell E. Magdonald, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 

Joseph J. Michaels, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 73 

Jost J. Michelsen, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 

William F. Murphy, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 

Paul G. Myerson, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 

Alfred Pope, AID., Instructor in Neuropathology. 

Fred A. Quadfasel, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 

Oscar J. Raeder, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 

Robert M. Ravven, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 

Eyeoleen N. Rexford, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

Augustus S. Rose, M.D., Instructor in Neurology and Psychiatry. 

Elvin V. Semrad, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 

Helen H. Tartakoff, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 

Arthur F. Valenstein, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 

Henry Wermer, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 

LeAIoyne White, Al.D., Instructor in Mental Health. 

W. Franklin W 7 ood, Al.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 

Elizabeth R. Zetzel, Al.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 

Harold S. Albert, Al.D., Assistant in Psychiatry. 

AIartin A. Berezin, Al.D., Assistant in Psychiatry. 

R. Barry Bigelow, Al.D., Assistant in Psychiatry. 

Gaston E. Blom, Al.D., Assistant in Psychiatry. 

John S. Bockoven, Al.D., Assistant in Psychiatry. 

Frances J. Bonner, Al.D., Assistant in Psychiatry. 

William J. Clauser, Al.D., Assistant in Psychiatry. 

Daniel C. Dawes, Al.D., Assistant in Psychiatry. 

Albert C. England, Jr., Al.D., Assistant in Neurology. 

Dan H. Funkenstein, Al.D., Assistant in Psychiatry. 

Max Goldman, Al.D., Assistant in Neurology. 

Volta R. Hall, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Psychiatry. 

Stanley S. Kanter, Al.D., Assistant in Psychiatry. 

Samuel Kaplan, Al.D., Assistant in Psychiatry. 

Abraham Kaye, Al.D., Assistant in Psychiatry. 

Sidney Levin, Al.D., Assistant in Psychiatry. 

Julius Levine, Al.D., Assistant in Psychiatry. 

James AIann, Al.D., Assistant in Psychiatry. 

Robert H. AIcCarter, Al.D., Assistant in Psychiatry. 

James A. AIeath, Jr., Al.D., Assistant in Neuropathology. 

Doris Menzer, Al.D., Assistant in Psychiatry. 

Henry H. W. AIiles, Al.D., Assistant in Psychiatry. 

Cecil AIushatt, Al.D., Assistant in Psychiatry. 

Vincent P. Perlo, Al.D., Assistant in Neurology. 

Edward P. Richardson, Jr., Al.D., Assistant in Neurology. 

Benjamin C. Riggs, Al.D., Assistant in Psychiatry. 



-4 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

Gregory Rochlin, M.D., Assistant in Psychiatry. 
Irving M. Rosen, M.D., Assistant in Psychiatry. 
Harley C. Shands, M.D., Assistant in Psychiatry. 
Stewart R. Smith, M.D., Assistant in Psychiatry. 
Ruth E. Stauffer, M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 
John F. Sullivan, M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 
William H. Tlmberlake, M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 
Jerome L. Weinberger, M.D., Assistant in Psychiatry. 
.Max Wool, MX)., Assistant in Psychiatry. 
Samuel Bo jar, x M.D., Research Fellow in Psychiatry. 
Arthur P. Burdon, M.D., Research Fellow in Psychiatry. 
Philip L. Christainsen, M.D., Research Fellow in Psychiatry. 
Sanford R. Gifford, Jr., M.D., Research Fellow in Psychiatry. 
Subramani Iyer, M.D., Research Fellow in Neurology. 
Ernest Kahn, M.D., Research Fellow in Psychiatry. 
Edwin F. Lang, Jr., M.D., Research Fellow in Neurology. 
.Maria Lorenz, M.D., Research Fellow in Psychiatry. 
Francis P. Murphy, Jr., M.D., Research Fellow in Psychiatry. 
Donald Ottenstein, M.D., Research Fellow in Psychiatry. 
Harry Stokholm, M.D., Research Fellow in Psychiatry. 
Richard E. Turk, M.D., Research Fellow in Psychiatry. 
Henri vander Eecken, M.D., Research Fellow in Neurology. 
Charles W. Watson, M.D., Research Fellow in Neurology. 
Raymond A. Adams, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Neurology. 
Lawrence J. Barrows, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Neurology. 
Lincoln D. Clark, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Psychiatry. 
Virginia L. Clower, AI.D., Teaching Fellow in Psychiatry. 
John C. Coolidge, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Psychiatry. 
Chester C. d'Autremont, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Psychiatry. 
Charles G. Craddock, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Psychiatry. 
Philip R. Dodge, AI.D., Teaching Fellow in Neurology. 
Frank R. L. Egloff, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Psychiatry. 
Mary Eichhorn, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Psychiatry. 
Harry C. H. Fang, jM.D., Teaching Fellow in Neurology. 
Martin R. Gardner, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Psychiatry. 
Richmond Holder, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Psychiatry. 
Simon Horenstlin, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Neurology. 
David Landau, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Psychiatry. 
John S. Mi.yj.k, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Neurology. 
Robert R. Mezer, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Psychiatry. 
Guy D. Niswander, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Psychiatry. 
Gardner C. Quarton, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Psychiatry. 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 75 

Earl G. Solomon, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Psychiatry. 

William H. Trethowan, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Psychiatry. 

Avery D. Weisman, M.D., Charles Foil en Folsom Teaching Fellow in 

Psychiatry. 
Lyman C. Wynne, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Psychiatry. 

Neurology 

Required Courses 

Second Year. — Clinical lectures are given at the Massachusetts General 
and Boston City Hospitals to the entire class. The object of the course is to 
give the student a general knowledge of the principles of diagnosis and 
treatment of diseases of the nervous system as a preparation for later work. 

Third Year. — Clinical lectures are given in the third year, at the Massa- 
chusetts General Hospital and the Boston City Hospital. The members of 
the class are also required to work in the neurological service at the M.G.H. 
or B.C.H. in sections during the year. For this work the more didactic teach- 
ing of the second year serves as a necessary preparation. The work is prac- 
tical in character and serves to bring the student into immediate contact 
with patients. 

SECOND YEAR HOURS 

Clinical lectures. Dr. Denny-Brown, B.C.H. and Dr. Kubik, M.G.H. 12 

THIRD YEAR 

Clinical lectures. Dr. Denny-Brown, B.C.H. and Dr. Kubik, M.G.H. 

Last eight Saturdays in first half-year. 12 

Section teaching. B.C.H. and M.G.H. Each student attends ten or 

eleven two and a half -hour exercises in neurology . 27 

Fourth Year Elective Courses 

1. Neurology. Dr. Kubik, M.G.H. Whole course (clerkship), all day. 

2. Advanced Neurology. Dr. Denny-Brown, B.C.H. Whole course, all 
day. 

Neuropathology 

Required Course 
Neuropathology A. Second Year. — The course consists of lectures, labo- 
ratory work, and demonstrations, amounting to fifty-four hours. The lec- 
tures introduce conceptions of value for the third year courses in neurology 
and psychiatry and for the neurological parts of courses in internal medicine 
and in surgery. Microscopical and gross specimens are studied. 

second year hours 

Lectures and laboratory work. Staff. Three times a week, for six weeks. 54 



J 6 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

Fourth Year Elective Course 

20. Research. Opportunities for research are available at the laboratories of 
the M.G.H., B.C.H., and H.M.S. Time and instructor to be arranged 
with Drs. Cobb or Denny-Brown. 

Psychiatry 

Required Courses 

First Year. — Normal Emotional Development. Ten lectures. Introduc- 
tion to the facts which have been established concerning the development 
of the human personality in the setting of the family and the culture. The 
course reviews some of the factors which must be considered in order 
helpfully to understand any human being whether he be sick or well, and 
the foundation is laid for the more advanced courses in psychopathology. 
The lectures deal with the development of the human personality from 
infancy through childhood, in adolescence, during maturity with special 
emphasis on the problems of vocation and marriage, and finally with the 
personal implications of aging. Stress is laid on the influence of anxiety 
and of unconscious forces on human behavior. 

Second Year. — The course consists of lectures introducing the methods 
of history-taking and the examination of patients applicable to the study of 
patients with psychiatric disorders. It is designed to serve as a preparation 
for the third year, when the student will be in direct contact with patients 
on the wards of the hospital. 

Third Year. — The class is divided into small sections for the clinical study 
of patients. Each student will be given the opportunity for studying indi- 
vidual cases in the wards of the Boston Psychopathic Hospital. During the 
second half year clinical lectures will be given once a week at the Boston 
Psychopathic Hospital. The most important varieties of mental disorder 
will be presented with emphasis upon the early recognition of mental 
disease, the methods of treatment applicable, including psychotherapy, and 
the special psychiatric treatment methods. 

Fourth Year. — During the fourth year each student will serve as clinical 
clerk for one month at the Boston Psychopathic Hospital, the Massachu- 
setts General Hospital, or McLean Hospital. Work with in-patients will 
consist of the study of patients with various types of mental disorder, and 
their treatment by psychotherapy and other methods of modern psychiatry. 
Study and treatment of ambulatory patients, with emphasis on the appli- 
cations of psychiatry to general medical practice, will be given by the 
Teaching Unit of The Southard Clinic and the out-patient departments 
of the Massachusetts General and Beth Israel Hospitals. Psychiatric prob- 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 77 

lems of children will be discussed by staff members of the Judge Baker 
Foundation, Children's Centre and the Child Psychiatry Clinic of the 
Massachusetts General Hospital. 

FIRST YEAR HOURS 

Lectures on Medical Psychology. Drs. Fox and Lindeman. B.P.H. and 
H.M.S. Twice a week, for five weeks. 10 

SECOND YEAR 

Lectures. Dr. Solomon and Associates. 10 

THIRD YEAR 

Clinical lectures. Dr. Solomon and Associates. B.P.H. Once a week, 
second half-year. 13 

Section teaching. Each student attends ten or eleven three-hour exer- 
cises. 32 

FOURTH YEAR 

Ci. Clinical Clerkship. Drs. Solomon, Cobb, and Bibring. B.P.H., 
M.G.H., McL.H. and B.I.H. 144 

Fourth Year Elective Courses 

4. Psychiatry. Dr. Solomon and Associates. Whole course, all day, offered 
throughout the year. B.P.H. 

5. Psychiatry. Drs. Cobb and Jessner. Special work in Psychosomatic 
Medicine or Child Psychiatry. Limited to one student each month. 
Whole course, all day. M.G.H. 

6. Psychiatry. Drs. Howard and Wood. Clinical Clerkship. Limited to one 
student each month. Whole course, all day. McL.H. 

Ophthalmology 

Edwin B. Dunphy, M.D., Henry Willard Williams Professor of Ophthal- 
mology at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Head of the 
Department. 

David G. Cogan, M.D., Associate Professor of Ophthalmic Research and 
Director of the Howe Laboratory of Ophthalmology. 

Parker Heath, M.D., Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Trygve Gundersen, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 

William P. Beetham, M.D., Clinical Associate in Ophthalmology. 

Paul A. Chandler, M.D., Clinical Associate in Ophthalmology. 

Paul Boeder, Ph.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology. 

Russell LeG. Carpenter, Ph.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology . 



78 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

Virgil G. Casten, M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology. 
Thomas Cavanaugh, M.D.C.M., Instructor in Ophthalmology . 
Mahlon T. Easton, M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology. 
Herman P. Grossman, M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology. 
Merrill J. King, M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology. 
Brendan D. Leahey, AID., Instructor in Ophthalmology. 
S. Forrest Martin, M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology. 
Harry K. Messenger, M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology. 
Abraham Pollen, M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology. 
Benjamln Sachs, M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology . 
Charles L. Schepens, M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology . 
Albert E. Sloane, M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology. 
Garrett L. Sullivan, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology. 
Leona R. Zacharias, Ph.D., Instructor in Ophthalmic Research. 
Henry F. Allen, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology. 
Harry E. Braconier, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology. 
Julian F. Chisholm, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology . 
Joseph M. Clough, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology . 
Carl C. Johnson, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology . 
Sumner D. Liebman, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology. 
Henry A. Mosher, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology . 
Abraham Pollen, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology . 
Earl S. Seale, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology . 

Required Courses 
First Year. — Instruction in anatomy and physiology of the eye. 
Second Year. — Instruction in pathology and pharmacology of the eye, 
and in optics of the ophthalmoscope. 

Third Year. — Instruction in clinical ophthalmology. 

third year hours 

Eleven clinical exercises. M.E.E.I. 27 

Lectures on clinical ophthalmology. H.M.S., second half-year. 5 

Fourth Year Elective Courses 

1. Clinical Ophthalmology. Dr. Dunphy and Staff. Whole course, all day. 
M.E.E.I. 

2. Clinical Ophthalmology. Dr. Dunphy and Staff. Half-course, morn- 
ings, occupying one month. M.E.E.I. 

3. Introduction to Ophthalmic Research. Howe Laboratory Staff. Whole 
course, afternoons, occupying two months. Arrangements to be de- 
cided upon by Director of Howe Laboratory and the student in each 
case. M.E.E.I. 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 79 

Howe Laboratory of Ophthalmology 

David G. Cogan, M.D., Associate Professor of Ophthalmic Research and 

Director of the Howe Laboratory of Ophthalmology. 
V. Everett Kinsey, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Ophthalmic Research, (re- 
signed December 31, 1950) 
Walter M. Grant, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmic Research. 
Clayton F. Black, S.B., Assistant in Ophthalmic Research. 
Frederic C. Merriam, Ph.D., Assistant in Ophthalmic Research. 
David D. Donaldson, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmic Research. 

The Howe Laboratory of Ophthalmology was founded in 1927 by the 
late Dr. Lucien Howe. A sum of money equal to that given by Dr. Howe 
was donated by the Rockefeller Foundation. Laboratory space was pro- 
vided by the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. 

The purpose of the laboratory is to advance ophthalmology; its re- 
searches are not restricted to any particular phase of this science. Advan- 
tage is taken of the rich clinical material of the Infirmary. While the 
laboratory is purely an institution for research, the services of the various 
members of the staff are available for teaching in the Harvard Medical 
School and for assistance in the clinical work of the Infirmary. 

Radiology 

Merrill C. Sosman, M.D., Professor of Radiology at the Peter Bent Brigham 
Hospital and Head of the Department. 

Edward B. D. Neuhauser, M.D., Assistant Professor of Radiology at the 
Children's Hospital. 

Max Ritvo, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Radiology. 

Laurence L. Robbins, M.D., Assistant Professor of Radiology at the Massa- 
chusetts General Hospital. 

Alexander S. MacMillan, M.D., Clinical Associate in Radiology. 

Milford D. Schulz, M.D., Associate in Radiology at the Massachusetts Gen- 
eral Hospital. 

Felix G. Fleischner, M.D., Instructor in Radiology. 

Joseph H. Marks, M.D., Instructor in Radiology. 

Samuel A. Robins, M.D., Instructor in Radiology. 

Richard Schatzki, M.D., Instructor in Radiology. 

Irving A. Shauffer, M.D., Instructor in Radiology. 

Martin H. Wittenborg, M.D., Instructor in Radiology. 

Lawrence H. Andreson, M.D., Assistant in Radiology. 

Rocco P. Bevilacqua, M.D., Assistant in Radiology. 

William R. Christensen, M.D., Assistant in Radiology. 



8o THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

Milton Elkin, M.D., Assistant in Radiology. 

William R. Eyler, M.D., Assistant in Radiology. 

Joseph Hanelin, M.D., Assistant in Radiology. 

James J. xMcCort, M.D., Assistant in Radiology. 

Is adore Sedlezky, M.D., Assistant in Radiology. 

Charles G. Stetson, M.D., Assistant in Radiology (resigned December 31, 

1950). 
Stanley W. Wyman, M.D., Assistant in Radiology . 
John A. Martin, M.D., Research Fellow in Radiology . 
Worth H. Sprunt, 3D, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Radiology. 
William A. Tosick, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Radiology, (resigned 

December 31, 1950) 

Third Year. — During the third year the following instruction will be 
offered: (a) five general lectures to the entire class on the heart, the lungs, 
the gastro-intestinal tract, pediatric x-ray and irradiation therapy, respec- 
tively; (b) seven clinical exercises in each trimester for the third of the 
class taking medicine, for the purpose of correlating clinical and roentgeno- 
logical findings in major types of examinations; (c) exercises during each 
trimester for the third of the class taking surgery, involving observation and 
discussion of x-ray findings on surgical cases under study. 

Fourth Year Elective Courses 
Radiology. Drs. Robbins, M.G.H., Ritvo, B.C.H., Sosman, P.B.B.H., 
Fleischner, B.I.H., Neuhauser, C.H., and Marks, N.E.D.H. 

Pediatrics 

Allan M. Butler, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics and Head of the Depart- 
ment at the Massachusetts General Hospital. 

Charles A. Janeway, M.D., Thomas Morgan Rotch Professor of Pediatrics 
and Head of the Department at the Children's Hospital. 

Louis K. Diamond, M.D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the Children's 
Hospital. 

Clement A. Smith, M.D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the Boston 
Lying-in Hospital and Chairman of the Department. 

Bronson Crothers, M.D., Clinical Professor of Pediatrics. 

John A. V. Davies, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatrics. 

R. Cannon Eley, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatrics. 

Sydney S. Gellis, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the Beth Israel 
Hospital. 

Nathan B. Talbot, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

William McL. Wallace, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

Randolph K. Byers, M.D., Clinical Associate in Pediatrics. 

Stewart H. Clifford, M.D., Clinical Associate in Pediatrics. 

Lewis W. Hill, M.D., Clinical Associate in Pediatrics. 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 8 I 

Benedict F. Massell, M.D., Clinical Associate in Pediatrics. 
Jack Metcoff, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 
Ralph A. Ross, M.D., Clinical Associate in Pediatrics. 

Harry Shwachman, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics at the Children's Hos- 
pital. 
Louis Weinstein, M.D., Lecturer on Infectious Diseases. 
Edith Meyer, Ph.D., Research Associate. 

T. Herbert Scheinberg, M.D., Research Associate in Pediatrics. 
Fred H. Allen, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
William Berenberg, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Leo B. Burgin, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Charles D. Cook, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Ralph W. Daffinee, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
James W. Dow, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Henry E. Gallup, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Joseph Garland, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Gerald N. Hoeffel, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Lawrence C. Kingsland, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics, 
Janet W. Mc Arthur, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Francis C. McDonald, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Dorothea M. Moore, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Alexander S. Nadas, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Paul R. Patterson, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Dane G. Prugh, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Gertrud C. Reyersbach, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Frederick C. Robbins, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Eli C. Romberg, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Lendon Snedeker, M.D., M.P.H., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Richard C. Tefft, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
William J. Turtle, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
John W. G. Tuthill, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Olga E. Allers, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
Thomas B. Brazelton, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
John K. Brines, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
Douglas T. Davidson, Jr., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
William A. Dickson, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
Edward C. Dyer, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
Albert A. Frank, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
Nathan Gorin, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
Allen M. Hill, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
John P. Hubbell, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
Anna K. Kiehl, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 



82 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

Alexander S. MacDonald, Jr., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Elsie A. MacLachlan, S.B., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Donald E. McLean, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Lawrence S. Morse, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Robert T. Moulton, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Harry L. Mueller, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Joseph Osborne, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Henry M. Putnam, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Eleanore C. Zaudy, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Andzla S. Zygmuntowicz A.B., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Harlow F. Avery, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics, (resigned Decem- 
ber 31, 1950) 

Marc O. Beem, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 

Frederic M. Blodgett, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 

Wilhelm Blystad, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 

Leslie Corsa, Jr., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 

John D. Crawford, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 

Dante Del Campo, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 

Daniel C. Gajdusek, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 

Emile C. Gautier, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 

David Gitlin, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 

Anne F. Godley, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 

Donald Gribetz, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 

Dora C. Hsi-Chih, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 

Hans G. Keitel, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 

Weston M. Kelsey, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics, (resigned August 
31, 1950) 

William Locke, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 

iMargaret W. iMaroney, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 

Joseph M. Miller, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 

Julio F. Morato-Manaro, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 

Nobuyuki Nakasone, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 

George Nichols, Jr., M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 

Nancy P. Nichols, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 

Sylvia J. Onesti, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 

William Pfeffer, Jr., M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 

Charles P. Rance, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 

Charles H. Read, Jr., M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 

Geoffrey C. Robinson, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 

Robert Schwartz, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 

George B. Smith, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 

Svein L. Sveinson, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 

Ellsworth A. Twible, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 83 

Isabelle Valadian, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 
Aage Warming-Larsen, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics, (resigned De- 
cember 31, 1950) 
Ralph J. P. Wedgwood, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 
William H. Zinkham, M.D., Research Fellow in Pediatrics. 
Leonard Apt, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Pediatrics. 
Charles W. Daeschner, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Pediatrics. 
Franklin L. DeBusk, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Pediatrics. 
LeRoy L. Eldredge, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Pediatrics. 
John P. Graves, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Pediatrics. 
Harold I. Griffeath, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Pediatrics. 
John F. Hogan, Jr., M.D., Teaching Fellow in Pediatrics. 
John H. Kennell, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Pediatrics. 
Gerald A. Kerrigan, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Pediatrics. 
Joseph D. Knobloch, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Pediatrics. 
Cornelius Lansing, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Pediatrics. 
Charles A. Leach, Jr., M.D., Teaching Fellow in Pediatrics. 
James A. O'Shea, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Pediatrics. 
Richmond S. Paine, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Pediatrics. 
Walker P. Rivers, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Pediatrics. 
Herman Rosenblum, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Pediatrics. 
Edgar J. Schoen, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Pediatrics. 
Raymond Seltser, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Pediatrics. 
Iwao Uyeda, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Pediatrics. 



Harold C. Stuart, M.D., Professor of Maternal and Child Health. 

William G. Lennox, M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology. 

William M. Schmidt, M.D., Associate Professor of Maternal and Child 

Health Practice. 
Thomas H. Weller, M.D., Associate Professor of Tropical Public Health. 
Samuel W. Dooley, M.D., Assistant Professor of Maternal and Child Health. 
Benjamin G. Ferris, Jr., M.D., Associate in Physiology. 
George E. Gardner, M.D., Lecturer on Clinical Psychology. 
Stanton Garfield, M.D., M.P.H., Instructor in Child Health. 

Required Courses 

Second Year. — Lectures are given during the second year to familiarize 
the students with the study of children's diseases before they come into 
contact with patients. In this series are discussed the physiology of nutri- 
tion and the principles of infant feeding, the anatomical and physiological 
differences between children and adults, a consideration of the normal 
growth and development of children and the physiology and pathology of 
extracellular body fluids. 



84 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

Third Year. — 1 . Eight whole class exercises are given during the first 
half-year, in which the more important aspects of the diseases of childhood 
are presented. Three whole class lectures, on special subjects, are assigned 
to pediatrics by the Department of Medicine. 

2. Section teaching: Each section, during its assignment to the Children's 
Hospital for thirty-two days, receives correlated instruction in pediatrics, 
surgery, and orthopaedic surgery. The students are assigned to the out- 
patient department for eleven periods (three hours each) where under the 
supervision of instructors they receive actual experience in history-taking, 
physical examination and the care of infants and children. Conferences and 
clinics on important aspects of pediatrics form part of the course. One 
afternoon a week is devoted to demonstrations and practice in the care of 
the normal infant and child and five other afternoon exercises are devoted 
to infectious diseases, chiefly at the Haynes Memorial Hospital. 

Fourth Year. — The fourth year work consists of a month of instruction, 
either at the Children's Medical Service of the Massachusetts General 
Hospital or at the Children's and Infants' Hospitals. The students act as 
clinical clerks on the wards and receive instruction in infectious diseases at 
the Haynes Memorial Hospital once a week. 

SECOND YEAR HOURS 

Clinical lectures. C.M.C. Second half-year. 9 

THIRD YEAR 

Clinical lectures. C.M.C. First half-year. 8 

Section teaching. C.M.C. Throughout the year. 63 

FOURTH YEAR 

Ci. Clinical Clerkship. Dr. Janeway and Associates. C.M.C. 144 

C2. Clinical Clerkship. Dr. Butler and Associates. M.G.H. 144 

Fourth Year Elective Courses 

3. Advanced Pediatrics. Dr. Janeway and Associates. C.M.C. Whole 
course, all day. 

4. Advanced Pediatrics. Dr. Butler and Associates. M.G.H. Whole 
course, all day. 

5. Child Psychiatry. Drs. Cobb, Butler, Jessner, and Associates. M.G.H. 
Whole course, all day. 

6. Infectious Diseases. Dr. Weinstein. Haynes Memorial Hospital. Whole 
course, all day. 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 85 

Obstetrics 

Duncan E. Reid, M.D., William Lambert Richardson Professor of Obstetrics 

and Head of the Department. 
Franklin F. Snyder, M.D., Associate Professor of Anatomy and Obstetrics. 
Thomas R. Goethals, M.D., Clinical Professor of Obstetrics. 
Harold H. Rosenfield, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Obstetrics. 
Alfred L. Potter, M.D., Lecturer on Obstetrics. 
Daniel Abramson, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 
M. Fletcher Eades, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 
A. Gordon Gauld, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynaecology. 
John F. Murphy, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 
H. Bristol Nelson, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 
John L. Newell, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 
Francis Rouillard, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 
Charles P. Sheldon, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 
Judson A. Smith, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 
Robert H. Barker, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
Bertram H. Buxton, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
William L. Caton, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
Luke Gillespie, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynaecology. 
Daniel H. Hindman, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
Crawford H. Hinman, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
Walter S. Jones, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
Herbert T. Leighton, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
William J. MacDonald, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
Robert Martin, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

William J. Mulligan, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynaecology. 
Weston F. Sewall, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

Arthur W. Tucker, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynaecology. 
John Turner, 2D, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
Albert E. Weiner, M.D., Assistant hi Obstetrics, (resigned December 31, 

1950) 
Allen P. Winsor, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
Charles C. Roby, M.D., Research Associate in Obstetrics. 
Herbert B. Campbell, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Obstetrics. 
Robert E. Johnstone, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Obstetrics. 
Seymour L. Romney, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Obstetrics. 
Lloyd I. Sexton, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Obstetrics. 



86 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

Arthur T. Hertig, M.D., Professor of Pathology at the Boston Lying-in 

Hospital and Free Hospital for Women. 
John Rock, MX)., Clinical Professor of Gynaecology. 
Samuel B. Kirkwood, M.D., Assistant Professor of Maternal Health. 
Donald G. McKay, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 

Required Courses 

Third Year. — Students are assigned for a period of two weeks to the 
Boston Lying-in Hospital or to the Providence Lying-in Hospital. Each 
student will have an opportunity to study the care of pregnancy in the 
prenatal clinic. Instruction will be given in pelvimetry, examination of the 
obstetrical pelvis, and the fetal presentation and position. Under special 
instructors, considerable time will be devoted to conferences on normal 
obstetrics. The student will attend special clinics, and part of his time will 
be devoted to work in the labor and delivery rooms. 

Fourth Year. — This course takes one month of the regular fourth year 
curriculum. It will be given at the Boston Lying-in Hospital. During one 
third of the course the student will lodge at the Hospital and devote his 
time chiefly to attendance on cases in the Hospital. In the course of this 
work he will be called on to assist at operations and will be expected to 
make ward visits with the physician on duty in the Hospital. In the other 
part of the course he will continue to conduct the convalescence of the 
cases delivered by him during his resident service, and make daily ward 
visits at which clinical instruction will be given in the general management 
of normal and abnormal labor, in the study of the puerperal convalescence, 
and in the care of the young infant. During this period each student will 
be assigned to normal cases in the Hospital to follow through labor, de- 
livery, and the puerperium. During one third of the course the student 
will take histories and examine all patients who are admitted to the Hospital 
with medical conditions complicating the pregnant state. The remainder 
of his time will be devoted to the care and problems of the newborn. 
During this period he will work closely and receive instruction from the 
attending pediatrician. The student will also be given a course of demon- 
strations in operative obstetrics during his resident service, and each student 
will have an opportunity to perform the different operations on the mani- 
kin. Student conferences and instruction in obstetrical pathology will be an 
important part of the course. 

SECOND YEAR HOURS 

Lectures on Normal Obstetrics. Dr. Reid and Associates. H.M.S. 
Three times a week for four weeks. 12 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 87 

THIRD YEAR 

Lectures on Abnormal Obstetrics. Dr. Reid and Associates. H.M.S. 

Saturday mornings for twenty-four weeks. 24 

Practical instruction in Clinical Obstetrics by members of the Depart- 
ment. Throughout the year. 104 

FOURTH YEAR 

Ci. General Obstetrics. Dr. Reid and Associates. B.L.I.H. Practical 
instruction, in sections, in Clinical Obstetrics. One month. 144 

Voluntary Course 

30. The Physiology of Reproduction. Dr. Rock. Tuesdays, 3.30 p.m., 
offered one month during the year, H.M.S. 

Preventive Medicine 

David D. Rutstein, M.D., Professor of Preventive Medicine and Head of 

the Department. 
W. Lloyd Aycock, M.D., Associate Professor of Preventive Medicine and 

Hygiene. 

Oliver S. Hayward, M.D., Research Associate of Preventive Medicine. 
Henry J. Kowalski, M.D., Research Fellow in Preventive Medicine. 
William E. Reynolds, M.D., Research Fellow in Preventive Medicine. 



Jane Worcester, Dr.P.H., Associate Professor of Biostatistics. 

The preventive aspects of medicine and its various specialties are taught 
in all departments of the Medical School, and arrangements are made for 
the integration of such teaching with the more formal teaching in the re- 
quired course in preventive medicine. An effort is made to stress those 
aspects of preventive medicine which concern the practicing physician, 
rather than those which concern the public health officer. 

Required Course 

Preventive Medicine A. Third Year. — The course in preventive medicine 
consists of clinics, lectures, demonstrations and a Health Resources Survey. 
The preventive aspects of clinical medicine are correlated with information 
in the fields of epidemiology, biostatistics, social medicine, industrial medi- 
cine, medical economics and environmental sanitation. 

THIRD YEAR HOURS 

Clinics, lectures and demonstrations. Drs. Rutstein, Aycock and Staff, 

in cooperation with representatives of other departments. 135 



88 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

Voluntary Courses 

30. Critical Reading of the Medical Literature. Drs. Rutstein, Reynolds 
and Worcester. An orientation seminar course for third and fourth 
year students which will provide them with basic knowledge of bio- 
statistics as applied to the reading of medical literature. Second half- 
year. (Limited to fifteen students.) 

31. Advanced Work in Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology. Dr. 
Rutstein and Associates. The department offers opportunity for 
special study in field and laboratory. Students will be accepted after 
consultation with the staff of the department. 

Surgery 

Edward D. Churchill, M.D., Dr. (hon.), S.D. (hon.), F.R.C.S. (hon.), 

John Homans Professor of Surgery, and Head of the Department at the 

Massachusetts General Hospital. 
Henry K. Beecher, M.D., Henry Isaiah Dorr Professor of Research in 

Anaesthesia. 
Jacob Fine, M.D., Professor of Surgery at the Beth Israel Hospital, and 

Head of the Department at the Beth Israel Hospital. 
Robert E. Gross, M.D., William E. Ladd Professor of Child Surgery, and 

Head of the Department at the Children's Hospital. 
Francis D. Moore, M.D., Moseley Professor of Surgery, and Head of the 

Department at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital. 
Oliver Cope, M.D., Dr. (hon.), Associate Professor of Surgery. 
Franc D. Ingraham, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery at the Children's 

Hospital. 
James C. White, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery at the Massachusetts 

General Hospital. 
Thomas H. Lanman, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Leland S. McKittrick, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Francis C. Newton, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
J. Engelbert Dunphy, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
J. Hartwell Harrison, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Genito- 
urinary Surgery. 
Richard H. Sweet, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Fletcher H. Colby, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Genito -Urinary 

Surgery. 
Brown Aid. Dobyns, M.D., Assistant Professor of Surgery. 
Howard A. Frank, M.D., Assistant Professor of Surgery at the Beth Israel 

Hospital. 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 89 

D wight E. Harken, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Robert R. Linton, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Charles C. Lund, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Donald Munro, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurological Surgery. 

Ira T. Xath anson, M.D., Assistant Professor of Surgery. 

Arnold M. Seligman, M.D., Assistant Professor of Surgery at the Beth 
Israel Hospital and Tutor in Surgery. 

Fiorindo A. Simeone, M.D., Assistant Professor of Surgery, (resigned Sep- 
tember 9, 1950) 

William H. Sweet, M.D., Assistant Professor of Surgery. 

Grantley W. Taylor, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Carl W. Walter, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

.Marshall K. Bartlett, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery. 

Edward B. Benedict, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery. 

Bradford Cannon, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery. 

Henry H. Faxon, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery. 

Edward Hamlin, Jr., M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery. 

Bert B. Hershenson, M.D., Associate in Anesthesia at the Boston Lying-in 
Hospital. 

Donald W. MacCollum, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery. 

Donald D. Matson, iM.D., Associate in Surgery at the Children's Hospital 
and the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital. 

Harlan F. Newton, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery. 

George C. Prather, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery. 

Thomas B. Quigley, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery; Surgeon, Depart- 
ment of Hygiene, and Surgeon to the Harvard Athletic Association. 

Bertram Selverstone, M.D., Associate in Surgery at the Massachusetts 
General Hospital. 

Orvar Swenson, iM.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery, (resigned December 1, 
1950) 

Richard Warren, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery. 

Claude E. Welch, M.D., Clinical Associate in Surgery. 

Augustus Thorndike, M.D., Lecturer on Surgery; Chief Surgeon to the 
Department of Hygiene, and to the Harvard Athletic Association. 

Clarence L. Claff, A.B., Research Associate in Surgery. 

Orrie AI. Friedman, Ph.D., Research Associate in Surgery. 

Walter Juda, Dr.-Es-Sc, Research Associate in Surgery. 

George Austen, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Thomas W. Botsford, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Bernard D. Briggs, M.D., Instructor in Anaesthesia. 

Richard Chute, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 



QO THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

Chilton Crane, M.D., Instructor in Surgery and Assistant Surgical Adviser, 

Department of Hygiene. 
Ernest M. Daland, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
William S. Derrick, M.D., Instructor in Anaesthesia. 
George E. Donaghy, M.D., Instructor in Anaesthesia. 
Samuel Gilman, M.D., Instructor in Anaesthesia. 
Charles A. Hufnagel, M.D., Instructor in Surgery, (resigned August i, 

1950) 
Lee G. Kendall, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Walter S. Levenson, M.D., Instructor in Surgery, (died September 22, 1950) 
Luther A. Longino, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Charles A. MacGregor, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
John B. McKittrick, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
S. Richard Muellner, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Louis H. Nason, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
William C. Quinby, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
John W. Raker, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Horatio Rogers, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Frederick P. Ross, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
J. Gordon Scannell, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Frank G. Sheddan, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Robert M. Smith, M.D., Instructor in Anaesthesia. 
Lamar Soutter, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Arnold Starr, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Howard I. Suby, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Donald P. Todd, M.D., Instructor in Anaesthesia. 
John H. Tucci, M.D., Instructor in Anaesthesia, (resigned September 24, 

1950) 
Arthur L. Abrams, M.D., Assistant in Anaesthesia. 
Henry T. Ballantine, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Hathorn P. Brown, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Charles B. Burbank, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
John W. Chamberlain, ALD., Assistant in Surgery. 
Gordon A. Donaldson, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Edward D. Frank, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
F. Thomas Gephart, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Irad B. Hardy, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Louis Hermanson, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Sylvester B. Kelley, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Walter S. Kerr, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Henry A. Kontoff, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Wyland F. Leadbetter, jM.D., Assistant in Surgery. 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 9 1 

Samuel Lowis, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Adolph Meltzer, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Carroll C. Miller, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Charles G. Mixter, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Leon Rosenfeld, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

John B. Sears, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Arnold L. Segel, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Richard H. Wallace, AID., Assistant in Surgery. 

Paul F. Ware, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

George F. Wilkins, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Rivka Ashbel, D.Sc, Research Fellow in Surgery, (resigned December 31, 
1950) 

Edward V. Bennett, M.D., Research Fellow in Surgery. 

Edgar A. Bering, Jr., M.D., Research Fellow in Surgery, (resigned Decem- 
ber 31, 1950) 

James L. Buchanan, M.D., Research Fellow in Surgery. 

John J. Cranley, Jr., M.D., Research Fellow in Surgery. 

Peter H. Dillard, M.D., Research Fellow in Surgery. 

Harry H. G. Eastcott, M.B., Research Fellow in Surgery, (resigned Septem- 
ber 1, 1950) 

Isidore S. Edelman, M.D., Research Fellow in Surgery. 

Helge Faber, M.D., Research Fellow in Surgery. 

Fred DuM. Fowler, M.D., Research Fellow in Surgery. 

James B. Golden, M.D., Research Fellow in Surgery. 

Harold B. Haley, M.D., Research Fellow in Surgery. 

Edmund J. Harris, M.D., Research Fellow in Surgery. 

Milton C. Hoffman, M.D., Research Fellow in Surgery. 

Robert A. Jamieson, M.B.Ch.B., Research Fellow in Surgery, (resigned 
September 30, 1950) 

Manucher J avid, M.D., Research Fellow in Surgery. 

Andrew G. Jessiman, M.B.Ch.B., Research Fellow in Surgery, (resigned 
December 15, 1950) 

Daniel J. Joly, M.D., Research Fellow in Surgery. 

William B. Logan, M.D., Research Fellow in Surgery, (resigned October 31, 
1950) 

Edmund C. Meadows, M.D., Research Fellow in Surgery, (resigned Decem- 
ber 31, 1950) 

Irving A. Meeker, Jr., M.D., Research Fellow in Surgery, (resigned Decem- 
ber 31, 1950) 

William R. Merrington, M.Surg., Research Fellow in Surgery, (resigned 
July 31, 1950) 

Albert J. D. Michel, M.D., Research Fellow in Surgery. 

John McL. Olney, Jr., M.D., Henry E. Warren Fellow in Surgery, (resigned 
December 1, 1950) 



92 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 



Donald O. Rudin, M.D., Research Fellow in Anaesthesia. 

Alvin S. Schwartz, A4.D., Research Fellow in Surgery. 

Georges Stoll, M.D., Research Fellow in Surgery, (resigned August i, 1950) 

Anthony F. Susen, M.D., Research Fellow in Surgery, (resigned Decem- 
ber 31, 1950) 

Philip H. Walker, M.D., Research Fellow in Surgery. 

Robert S. Weiner, M.D., Research Fellow in Surgery. 

Philip A. Weisman, M.D., Research Fellow in Surgery. 

Anne Wight, M.D., Research Fellow in Surgery. 

Louis Bakay, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Surgery. 

Frank L. Collins, Jr., M.D., Teaching Fellow in Surgery. 

Robert E. Farrand, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Surgery. 

Richard W. Garrity, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Surgery, (resigned Au- 
gust 31, 1950) 

David M. Hume, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Surgery. 

William V. McDermott, Jr., M.D., Teaching Fellow in Surgery. 

Robert L. McLaurin, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Surgery. 

George L. Nardi, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Surgery. 

Richard G. Nilges, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Surgery. 

Benson B. Roe, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Surgery, (resigned November 1, 
1950) 

Alexander M. Rutenburg, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Surgery. 

Bernard R. Sears, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Surgery. 

Nicholas McL. Stahl, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Surgery. 

William R. Waddell, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Surgery. 

Required Courses 

Instruction will be given by amphitheatre clinics, lectures, and confer- 
ences, together with section teaching in the wards and outpatient depart- 
ments of the hospitals and in the surgical research laboratories. 

Second Year. — The course is designed to correlate preclinical sciences 
with the basic principles underlying the surgical management of injury and 
disease. The Department of Surgery joins with the Department of Medi- 
cine in a series of exercises in physical diagnosis and laboratory medicine 
to offer unified instruction in case taking. Practical exercises are offered 
that introduce the student to basic surgical technics. 

Third Year. — The course is conducted in the outpatients and wards of 
the hospitals affiliated with the School. The students are divided into three 
groups, each group in rotation being apportioned to one of the hospitals 
affiliated with the School for instruction in surgery over a sixty-four-day 
period. During this period they will study general surgery and urology at 
the hospital to which they are assigned, and will also receive instruction in 
gynaecology at the Free Hospital for Women and the Massachusetts 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 93 

General Hospital and in laryngology at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear 
Infirmary. Instruction in the surgery of children is given during the pedi- 
atric section work at the Children's Hospital. Opportunity for experience 
in surgical operative technics is offered in Voluntary Course 32 that may be 
taken in conjunction with section work. 

Fourth Year. — A series of not less than two months as clinical clerk in 
the surgical wards of the M.G.H., P.B.B.H., C.H., or B.I.H. is required of 
each student. Surgery C5 is limited to qualified students and applications 
are to be made in person. 

Each student, before graduation, is required to administer six inhalation 
(ether) anaesthesias and is responsible for charting the course of three 
patients during local or spinal anaesthesia. 

SECOND YEAR HOURS 

Lectures and demonstrations on the fundamental aspects of clinical sur- 
gery and anaesthesia. Drs. Beecher, Churchill, Moore, and Asso- 
ciates. M.G.H. and P.B.B.H. Second half-year. 15 

Section work case taking, lectures and demonstrations on the physical 
diagnosis of surgical disease in conjunction with the Department 
of Medicine. M.G.H., P.B.B.H., and B.I.H. Each student has 
twenty-jour exercises. 84 

THIRD YEAR 

Amphitheatre lectures. Drs. Churchill, Moore, and Associates. Once 
a week throughout the year. 38 

Exercises in sections in the wards and out-patient departments at the 
M.G.H., P.B.B.H., and B.I.H. Each section has thirty-two exercises 
of two and a half hours each and twenty-one exercises of three 
hours each. 116 

Genito-Urinary Surgery. Section work. M.G.H., P.B.B.H., and B.I.H. 
Each student has ten or eleven two-and-a-half -hour exercises. 27 

Children's Surgery. Section work. C.H. Each student has four one- 
and-a-half -hour exercises, eleven one-hour exercises, and five two- 
hour exercises. 27 

FOURTH YEAR 

Clinical Clerkship: M.G.H. (Surgery Ci, Dr. Churchill and Asso- 
ciates); P.B.B.H. (Surgery C3, Dr. Moore and Associates); B.I.H. 
(Surgery C4, Dr. Fine and Associates); C.H. (Surgery C5, 
Children's Surgery, Dr. Gross and Associates). 288 

Fourth Year Elective Courses 

8. Genito-Urinary Surgery. Dr. Harrison. P.B.B.H. Whole course, 
all day. Limited to two students each month. 



94 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

9. Anaesthesia. Dr. Beecher. M.G.H. Whole course, all day. At- 
tendance limited. Applications to be made in person. 
10. Neurosurgery. Dr. J. C. White and Associates. M.G.H. Whole 
course, all day, limited to two students each month. Clinical clerk- 
ship on the neurosurgical wards. Apply to Dr. White. 

20. Surgical Investigation. H.A1.S. Laboratory for Surgical Research. 
Whole course, all day. Dr. Moore and Associates. 

21. Surgical Investigation. Dr. Churchill and Associates. M.G.H. 
Whole course, all day. 

Voluntary Courses 

31. Clinical Applied Anatomy. Drs. Churchill, Moore, and Asso- 
ciates. Saturdays, 9 to 10 a.m., coincident with Anatomy. M.G.H. 
and P.B.B.H. Open to first year students. (Same course as 
Anatomy 30.) 

32. Surgical Technique. Members of the third year class may register 
for the following courses in surgical technique at the hospital to 
which they have been assigned for their section work. 

1. Operative Technique. Dr. J. B. AicKittrick and Associates. 
Thursday afternoons throughout the year. Surgical Laboratories, 
M.G.H. May only be taken coincidentally with section work. 

2. Operative Technique. Dr. Walter and Associates. Thursday 
afternoons during the Second Trimester. Laboratory for Surgical 
Research, H.M.S. Apply to Dr. Walter during November. 

3. Operative Technique. Dr. Fine and Associates. Thursday 
afternoons throughout the year. Surgical Research Laboratory, 
B.I.H. 

Gynaecology 

George Van S. Smith, M.D., W. H. Baker Professor of Gynaecology and 

Head of the Department. 
Joe V. Meigs, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gynaecology. 
John Rock, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gynaecology. 
Somers II. Sturgis, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Gynaecology. 
I Ioward Ulfei.der, M.D., Clinical Associate in Gynaecology. 
Olive W. Smith, Ph.D., Research Associate in Gynaecology. 
Christopher J. Duncan, M.D., Instructor in Gynaecology. 
A. Gordon Gauld, M.D., Instructor in Gynaecology and Obstetrics. 
Francis McC. [ngersoll, M.D., Instructor in Gynaecology. 
Fred A. Simmons, M.D., Instructor in Gynaecology. 
Pall A. Younge, M.D., Instructor in Gynaecology. 
W. Benjx.min Bacon, M.D., Assistant in Gynaecology. 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 95 

Patricia S. Benedict, M.D., Assistant in Gynaecology. 

Luke Gillespie, M.D., Assistant in Gynaecology and Obstetrics. 

William J. Mulligan, M.D., Assistant in Gynaecology and Obstetrics. 

Joseph H. Phillips, M.D., Assistant in Gynaecology . 

Edward B. Sheehan, At.D., Assistant in Gynaecology. 

Arthur W. Tucker, Jr., MX)., Assistant in Gynaecology and Obstetrics. 

Herbert W. Horne, Jr., M.D., Research Fellow in Gynaecology. 

Mark E. Conan, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Gynaecology. 

James A. Fitzgerald, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Gynaecology. 

Thomas A. Ritzman, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Gynaecology. 

Seymour L. Romney, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Gynaecology. 

Lloyd I. Sexton, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Gynaecology. 

Bartlett H. Stone, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Gynaecology. 



Arthur T. Hertig, M.D., Professor of Pathology at the Boston Lying-in Hos- 
pital and at the Free Hospital for Women. 
Samuel B. Kirkwood, M.D., Assistant Professor of Maternal Health. 

Required Course 

Third Year. — Instruction is given by lectures and clinical teaching in the 
wards and "outpatient departments of the Free Hospital for Women and 
the Massachusetts General Hospital. The student is instructed in the 
examination, diagnosis, and treatment of gynaecological disease. 

THIRD YEAR HOURS 

Lectures. Drs. Smith, Meigs and Rock. H.M.S. 6 

Clinical exercises. Drs. Duncan, Gauld, Mulligan, Phillips, Sheehan, 
and Tucker, F.H.W. Drs. Meigs, Benedict, Ingersoll, Simmons, 
and Ulfelder, M.G.H. In sections, throughout the year. Each 
student attends ten or twelve exercises. 27 

Fourth Year Elective Course 

1. Clinical Course. Drs. Smith, Duncan, Gauld, Mulligan, Phillips, 
Sheehan, Tucker, and Younge, F.H.W. Gynaecological pathology 
included. Dr. Arthur T. Hertig and Assistants. Full course, one 
month, all day, offered throughout the year. 

Orthopedic Surgery 

Joseph S. Barr, M.D., John Ball and Buckminster Brown Clinical Professor 
of Orthopedic Surgery and Head of the Department at the Massachusetts 
General Hospital. 



96 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

William T. Green, M.D., Clinical Professor of Orthopedic Surgery and 

Head of the Department at the Children's Hospital. 
Albert H. Brewster, M.D., Clinical Associate in Orthopedic Surgery. 
Edwin F. Cave, M.D., Clinical Associate in Orthopedic Surgery. 
William A. Rogers, MD., Clinical Associate in Orthopedic Surgery. 
Otto E. Aufranc, M.D., Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery. 
David S. Grice, M.D., Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery. 
Paul W. Hugenberger, M.D., Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery. 
Robert J. Joplin, M.D., Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery. 
Meier G. Karp, M.D., Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery. 
Armin Klein, M.D., Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery. 
John G. Kuhns, M.D., Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery. 
Robert H. Morris, M.D., Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery. 
Paul L. Norton, M.D., Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery. 
John A. Reidy, M.D., Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery. 
Thomas F. Broderick, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery. 
Thornton Brown, M.D., Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery. 
Jonathan Cohen, M.D., Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery. 
William A. Elliston, M.B.Ch.B., Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery. 
Elmer Franseen, M.D., Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery. 
William N. Jones, M.D., Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery. 
Eugene E. Record, M.D., Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery. 
Carter R. Rowe, M.D., Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery. 
Charles L. Sturdevant, M.D., Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery. 
Robert Ulin, M.D., Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery. 
George W. Westin, M.D., Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery. 
Albert B. Ferguson, Jr., M.D., Teaching Fellow in Orthopedic Surgery. 
Stanley T. Soholt, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Orthopedic Surgery. 
Arthur W. Trott, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Orthopedic Surgery. 
Howard S. Way, M.D., Teaching Fellow in Orthopedic Surgery. 

Required Course 

Third Year. — Instruction is given in orthopedic surgery by lectures at 
the Children's Hospital and the Massachusetts General Hospital in the first 
half of the third year, and throughout the third year by clinical exercises at 
the Children's Hospital, the Massachusetts General Hospital, the Peter Bent 
Brigham Hospital, and the Beth Israel Hospital. 

third year hours 

Lectures. Drs. Barr, Green and Associates. M.G.H. and C.M.C. First 
half-year. 8 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 97 

Clinical exercises. Drs. Barr, Green and Associates. C.M.C., M.G.H. 
and P.B.B.H. In sections throughout the year. 30 

The students are assigned to the Children's Medical Center; one-third of 
the period is spent in clinical exercises in orthopedic surgery. 

The clinical exercises in orthopedic surgery and industrial surgery of 
adults are correlated with clinical exercises in general surgery at the 
Massachusetts General Hospital, the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital and 
the Beth Israel Hospital during the surgical assignment to these hospitals. 

Fourth Year Elective Courses 

1. Clinical Course. Dr. Barr and Associates. M.G.H. Whole course, all 
day. Limited to two students each month. 

2. Clinical Course. Dr. Green and Associates. C.M.C. Whole course, all 
day. Limited to two students each month. 

3. Clinical Course. Chief of Staff and Associates. C.M.C. and M.G.H. 
Whole course, all day. Limited to two students each month. 

Otology and Laryngology 

LeRoy A. Schall, M.D., Walter Augustus Lecovipte Professor of Otology 

and Professor of Laryngology, and Head of the Department. 
Robert L. Goodale, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Laryngology. 
Moses H. Lurie, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Otology. 
Philip E. Meltzer, M.D., Lecturer on Otology. 
Walter J. E. Carroll, M.D., Instructor in Laryngology. 
Maurice G. Evans, M.D., Instructor in Laryngology. 
Carlyle G. Flake, M.D., Instructor in Laryngology. 
Edgar M. Holmes, M.D., Instructor in Otology. 
George Kelemen, M.D., Instructor in Otology. 
Berton E. Lovesey, M.D., Instructor in Laryngology. 
Werner Mueller, M.D., Instructor in Otology and Laryngology. 
Lyman G. Richards, M.D., Instructor in Laryngology. 
John R. Richardson, M.D., Instructor in Laryngology . 
Francis L. Weille, M.D., Instructor in Laryngology. 
Calvin M. Cerrato, M.D., Asisstant in Otolaryngology. 
Joshua C. Drooker, M.D., Assistant in Laryngology. 
Charles F. Ferguson, M.D., Assistant in Otology. 
Vlncent J. Kelley, M.D., Assistant in Laryngology. 
Joseph Lentine, M.D., Assistant in Laryngology. 
Donald K. Lewis, M.D., Assistant in Laryngology. 
Daniel Miller, M.D., Assistant in Otology. 
Aram Roopenian, M.D., Assistant in Otology. 






98 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

Herman J. Sternstein, M.D., Assistant in Otolaryngology. 
Don J. Weekes, M.D., Assistant in Otology and Laryngology. 



Alexander S. MacMillan, M.D., Clinical Associate in Radiology. 

Required Course 

Third Year. — Instruction is given by lectures at the Harvard Medical 
School and clinical instruction in the third year in sections, each student 
receiving instruction every morning for two weeks at the Massachusetts Eye 
and Ear Infirmary with anatomical and histological demonstrations at the 
Harvard Medical School. 

Laryngology. — Instruction consists of lectures and section work in the 
third year, each section being assigned to the throat clinic of the M.E.E.I. 
In addition to clinical instruction, special demonstrations in anatomy are 
given at the Harvard Medical School. 

THIRD YEAR HOURS 

Clinical exercises in Otology. Dr. Schall and Staff. M.E.E.I. Every 
student has eight exercises. 27 

Lectures in Otology. Dr. Lurie. H.M.S. Five Tuesdays in first half- 
year. 5 

Clinical exercises in Laryngology. Dr. Schall and Staff. M.E.E.I. Ten 
or eleven exercises for each student. zy 

Laryngology Lectures. Dr. Schall. H.M.S. Six Tuesdays in second 
half-year. 6 

Fourth Year Elective Courses 

1. Clinical Otology. Dr. Schall and Associates. M.E.E.I. Half-course, 
mornings, offered throughout the year. 

2. Clinical Laryngology. Dr. Schall and Staff. M.E.E.I. Half-course, 
mornings, offered throughout the year. 

Medical Military Science 

Weldon J. Walker, M.D., Associate in Medical Military Science. 

Voluntary Courses 

The following courses will be of thirty-two hours' duration during each 
of the four years in medicine and will consist of lectures and conferences 
supplemented by motion pictures and other training aids. On occasions mem- 
bers of the staff and other outside speakers will be asked to aid in making 
the course as interesting and informative as possible. 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 99 

These subjects will be taught in such a manner that they will be applica- 
ble to civilian medical practice, 
i. Army Organization as a whole and the Medical Department in particu- 
lar. 

October-January, Thursdays, 5:00-6:00 p.m. 
February -May, Fridays, 4:00-5:00 p.m. 
Open to first year students. 

2. The Operation of the Medical Department including First Aid, Medical 
Supply and Map Reading. 

October-May, Thursdays, 4:00-5:00 p.m. 

Open to second year students who are veterans having had six months 
to a year military service and to others with previous ROTC training. 

3. Military Preventive Medicine and Field Medicine and Surgery. 
October-May, Tuesdays, 4:00-5:00 p.m. 

Open to third year students who are veterans having had one year or 
more military service and to others with the required previous ROTC 
Training. 

4. Military Preventive Medicine and Field Medicine and Surgery. 
October-May, alternate Thursdays, 7:00-9:00 p.m. 

Open to fourth year students who have had the required previous 
ROTC training. 



SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE 

Announcement of Courses 
Division of Studies 

Total Number of Hours for Each Subject 



first year 




second year 


See 




See 


Medical 
Curriculum 




Medical 
Curriculum 


THIRD YEAR 


hours 


FOURTH YEAR 



HOURS 

Dental medicine (*248 hours) 24 

Operative dentistry * 8 

Oral surgery (*$6 hours) 32 

Orthodontics 32 

Pediatric dentistry * 70 

Prosthetic dentistry * 20 

Dental materia medica 16 

Seminar 30 

Elective work (approximately) 150 

General Clinic 796 



Dental morphology 32 

Oral histo-pathology 30 

Experimental surgery 24 

Dental medicine (*o6 hours) .. 25 

Operative dentistry * 144 

Endodontia * 12 

Periodontia * 14 

Dental prosthesis * 122 

Crown and bridge * 77 

Oral surgery (* 14 hours) 8 

Radiology * 16 

Orthodontics* 16 

Dental public health 20 

Nutrition 8 

Seminar 30 

General Clinic 604 

Total 1178 Total 1178 

* These subjects are also covered in General Clinic, either to an indefinite extent or for 
the specific number of hours named. 

The tabulated hours above indicate the approximate allotment of time 
for the third and fourth academic years in the School of Dental Medicine. 
As the entering classes are limited to fifteen students, it is possible to reduce 
the time usually involved in courses of applied dental techniques. Indi- 
vidual instruction, demonstrations, seminars and conferences will, to a great 
extent, replace the traditional lecture system. 

The schedule provides considerable time in the fourth year to allow the 
student to follow special clinical or research interests. Students are as- 
signed faculty advisers for guidance in these activities. 



00 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES IOI 

Dental Morphology 
Myron J. Van Leeuwen, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Clinical Dentistry. 
i st semester 3rd year. Instruction in the special histology and embryology 
of the teeth and their supporting structures. Dental anatomy. Technique 
practice in reproduction of tooth forms. 

Oral Histo-Pathology 

Reidar F. Sognnaes, L.D.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Dental Medicine. 
John T. Albright, D.D.S., Research Fellow in Dental Medicine. 
3rd and 4th years. The teaching of this subject is an important part of 
many activities in the clinic and in the hospitals. This teaching is augmented 
by a series of demonstrations and conferences devoted to the pathological 
histology of the teeth and periodontal tissues. 

Laboratory Methods 

Roy O. Greep, Ph.D., Professor of Dental Science. 
Paul L. Munson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Dental Science. 
1 st semester 3rd year. Practice in laboratory techniques useful in funda- 
mental dental research with emphasis on experimental surgery, biochemical 
instrumentation and histochemical procedures. 

Nutrition 
James H. Shaw, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Dental Medicine. 
2nd semester 3rd year. Discussion of nutritional requirements, relative values 
of various food sources and collection and evaluation of diet histories. Clinic 
practice in taking and evaluation of diet histories, followed by recommenda- 
tion. 

Clinical Dentistry 

Arthur M. Maloney, D.M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Dentistry. 

G. Earl Thompson, D.M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry. 

Myron J. Van Leeuwen, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Clinical Dentistry 
and Director of Clinic. 

Herman DeWilde, M.D., D.M.D., Associate in Clinical Dentistry. 

Joseph P. Jazowski, D.M.D., Clinical Associate in Dentistry. 

Paul H. Keyes, D.D.S., Associate in Clinical Dentistry and Assistant Direc- 
tor of Clinic. 

Edward J. Durling, D.M.D., Instructor in Oral Surgery, (resigned Decem- 
ber 31, 1950) 

George F. Kopf, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Dentistry. 

Harold L. Ehrlich, D.M.D., Assistant in Clinical Dentistry. 



102 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

Richard L. Miner, D.D.S., Assistant in Dental Medicine. 
Charles L. Boyers, D.M.D., Teaching Fellow in Dental Medicine. 
George Christman, D.M.D., Teaching Fellow in Dental Medicine. 
Owen W. Kite, D.M.D., Teaching Fellow in Dental Medicine. 

Oral Surgery — 3rd and 4th years. 

Instruction in extraction, minor dental surgery and anaesthesia is given at 
the Dental Infirmary. At the dental clinic of the Massachusetts General 
Hospital there is an opportunity to observe and assist in more extensive 
surgery in the oral cavity, fractures and traumatic injuries of the face and 
jaws. Opportunities for graduate work are offered here. Surgical prosthesis 
and plastic surgery are carried on at the Massachusetts General Hospital. 
Dr. DeWilde and Staff. 

Radiology — 3rd and 4th years. 

Principles of applied roentgenology and the interpretation of radiographs 
are covered the third year, with consideration of the electro-physical basis 
of roentgenology in the fourth year. Practice in radiological technique is 
given in both years. Dr. DeWilde. 

Operative Dentistry — 3rd and 4th years. 

Accepted methods of dental prophylaxis and oral hygiene, technique of 
cavity preparation, manipulation of plastic filling materials, gold inlay tech- 
nique, conservative periodontal therapy and root canal therapy in the third 
year, supplemented by practice in the general clinic. Gold foil technique 
(optional) and further clinical practice in all phases in the fourth year. 
Odontotypes fitted to the headrests of the dental chairs in many instances 
avoid the necessity for learning two sets of hand motions: one for the 
bench and one for the chair. Periodontia and endodontia are graded sepa- 
rately and are not included in the operative dentistry grade. Dr. Van 
Leeuwen and Staff. 

Prosthetic Dentistry — 3rd and 4th years 

Complete and partial denture technique and clinical practice in the third 
year. Crown and bridge technique and clinical practice in all phases in the 
fourth year. A study of dental materials and metallurgy in the third year. 
Denture prosthesis and crown and bridge work are graded separately. Dr. 
Maloney and Staff. 

General Clinic — 3rd and 4th years 

Practice in operative and prosthetic dentistry, periodontics, orthodontics, 
oral hygiene, oral diagnosis, and roentgenology. In the third year, 21 hours 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES IO3 

are devoted specifically to oral surgery and 92 hours to dental medicine. In 
the fourth year, 21 hours are devoted specifically to oral surgery, 96 hours 
to dental medicine, and 10 or more to dental pediatrics. Clinical work in 
dental pediatrics is at the Children's Hospital. 

Orthodontics 

Charles M. Waldo, D.D.S., Associate Professor of Orthodontics. 
Melvin I. Cohen, D.M.D., Assistant in Orthodontics. 
Lennard T. Swanson, D.M.D., Assistant in Orthodontics. 
3rd and 4th years. — Clinical instruction consists in the observation of de- 
veloping dentures, the use of preventive measures, the use of the simple 
orthodontic treatment procedures by each student. Opportunity is pro- 
vided for experience beyond the required minimum for those students with 
special interest and ability. Discussions and demonstrations supplement the 
work of the clinic. Dr. Waldo and Associates. 

Dental Medicine 

David Weisberger, D.M.D., M.D., Associate Professor of Dental Medicine 
and Chief of the Dental Department at the Massachusetts General Hos- 
pital. 
Paul LeB. Sweet, D.M.D., Assistant in Dental Medicine. 
3rd and 4th years. — A course devoted to the diagnosis and treatment of 
oral diseases, i.e., diseases of the periodontium, dental pulp, oral mucosa 
and other oral structures together with their correlation to systemic condi- 
tions. Lectures, seminars, clinical practice and observation both in the Den- 
tal Infirmary and at the Massachusetts General Hospital. 

Infirmary procedures, identification of oral structures, methods of oral 
examination, history taking, and common methods of diagnosis for dental 
and oral disease are given in both years, supplemented by practice in the 
general clinic. Dr. Weisberger and Associates. 

Pediatric Dentistry 

Paul K. Losch, D.D.S., Associate Professor of Pediatric Dentistry at the 

Children's Hospital. 
Edward I. Silver, D.M.D., Lecturer on Dental Pediatrics. 



Sidney Farber, M.D., Professor of Pathology at the Children's Hospital. 
Robert E. Gross, M.D., William E. Ladd Professor of Child Surgery. 
Charles A. Janeway, M.D., Thomas Morgan Rotch Professor of Pediatrics. 
Edward B. Neuhauser, iM.D., Assistant Professor of Radiology at the Chil- 
dren's Hospital. 



104 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

3rd and 4th years. — Those phases of operative dentistry, oral hygiene, and 
orthodontics applicable to young children and carried on in the general 
clinic in the Dental Building. Special lectures are given in the third year. 
A course in dental pediatrics given in the fourth year is designed to cover 
those phases of systemic and oral disease best seen under hospital condi- 
tions and is conducted at the Children's Hospital. Operative work is per- 
formed only for those children admitted to the Hospital. Cases involving 
systemic sequelae of dental disease and oral manifestations of systemic disease 
receive especial consideration. Students attend regular hospital conferences 
in surgery, clinical pathology, roentgenology and medicine. Medical and 
dental ward rounds are made. Dr. Losch and Associates. 

Dental Public Health 

James M. Dunning, D.D.S., M.P.H., Dean. 
H. Shirley Dwyer, D.D.S., Lecturer on Preventive Dentistry. 
Howard M. Marjerison, D.M.D., S.D. (hon.), Lecturer on Preventive Den- 
tistry. 



John E. Gordon, M.D., Professor of Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology. 
Franz Goldmann M.D., Associate Professor of Medical Care. 
3rd year. — Public Health principles and practices with emphasis on the par- 
ticipation of the dentist. Elements of biostatistics. Lectures, seminars and 
field work. Dr. Dunning and Associates. 

Dental Materia Medica 
Leslie M. Ohmart, A.M., Lecturer on Dental Materia Medica. 
2nd semester 4th year. — Specific consideration of dental problems and de- 
velopment of formulary for clinical dentistry, in addition to coverage of 
practical therapeutic problems in the general clinic. 

Dental Clinical Seminar 
Roy O. Greep, Ph.D., Professor of Dental Science. 

3rd and 4th years. — Individual students in rotation prepare topics within the 
fields of clinical dentistry, dental medicine, or public health and present these 
topics before the members of their own class, the other clinical class, and 
the members of the staff. Free discussion follows. Normal and abnormal 
growth problems occupy chief attention in the third year. The fourth year 
seminars review the material of the basic medical sciences in the light of 
clinical experience. Dr. Greep and entire Staff. 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES IO5 



Dental Practice Management 
James M. Dunning, D.D.S., M.P.H., Dean. 



Richard Ford, M.D., Assistant Professor of Legal Medicine. 

2nd semester 4th year. — Lectures and seminars on practice management, 

ethics and jurisprudence. 

Elective Material 

4th year. — During or immediately preceding the fourth year, each student 
is expected to complete an elective project involving some creative work 
either in laboratory or clinical research. Appropriate time will be made 
available upon advice from the student's faculty adviser. Facilities of the 
School of Dental Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Children's Hos- 
pital and other institutions will be made available as needed. Faculty con- 
sultants will be appointed with whom the student will prepare plans for his 
elective project. 



REGISTRATION 

September 25, 1950 — June 21, 195 1 



io8 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 



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COURSES. TABULAR VIEW 



III 



FOURTH YEAR 

September 25, 1950 — June 21, 1951 
(Each block represents one month. Order of subjects variable.) 



Medicine 

CI, C2, C3* 

orC4* 



Medicine 

CI, C2, C3*, 

orC4* 



Surgery 
CI, C3, or C4* 



Surgery 
CI, C3, or C4 11 



Obstetrics 
CI 



Pediatrics 
CI or C2 



Psychiatry 
CI, C2, or C3 



Elective 



In addition to the eight months' required work, each student may elect courses for three 
additional months by anticipating work during the summer months. 
* October to May. 



112 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 



On March 13, 1950, One Degree was 
Conferred as Follows: 

M.D. 

James Crate Larkin, d.m.d. 1947. 

On June 22, 1950, One Hundred and Thirty-Two Degrees were 
Conferred as Follows: 

M.D. 

Hartwig Achenbach, s.b. (University of Florida) 1943. 

Richard Herbert Allen. 

Adrienne Patricia Applegarth, a.b. (Univeristy of California) 1946. 

Eugene Ronald Atherton. 

Robert Ray Aycock, s.b. (University of North Carolina) 1947. 

Rayma Lucille Babbitt, s.b. (University of Arizona) 1946. 

Elmer Earle Batts. 

Edgar Dawson Bell, Jr., a.b. (Haverford College) 1942. 

Stanley Berlow, a.b. (University of Michigan) 1941, a.m. (Harvard Uni- 
versity) ig^2. 

Mark Stuart Blumberg, d.m.d. 1948. 

Donald Cecil Borg, s.b. 1947 (1946). 

Eugene Dew Brand, a.b. (Universtiy of Virginia) 1944. 

John Thomas Brennan, Jr., s.b. (College of the Holy Cross) 1947. 

Leon Royden Briggs, Jr., s.b. 1944 (1943), d.m.d. 1948. 

Rufus Keene Broadaway, s.b. (Tufts College) 1946. 

John Townsend Burroughs, a.b. (Brown University) 1946. 

Edward Henry Caul, d.m.d. 1948. 

William Edward Christie, Jr., a.b. (Boston College) 1943. 

Robert Howarth Clifton, a.b. (Dartmouth College) 1945, d.m.d. (Harvard 
University) 1948. 

Edward Leonard Colman, 2d, a.b. (Yale University) 1942. 

Richard Joseph Creedon, a.b. 1946 (1945). 

Leonard Wolsey Cronkhite, Jr., a.b. (Botvdoin College) 1946 as of 1941. 

James Francis Cummins, 3d, s.b. (University of Illinois) 1942, s.m. (ibid.) 
1946. 

John Caulfield Dalton. 

John Oscar Dampeer, Jr., s.b. (University of Mississippi) 1947. 

Frederick McAllister Davies, s.b. (Tufts College) 1946. 

Victor Phillip DiDomenico, s.b. (Brown University) 1942, d.m.d. (Harvard 
University) 1948. 



DEGREES 1 1 3 

James Edward Ducey, s.b. (Univeristy of Pittsburgh) 1946. 

John Harold Eaton. 

Richard Harrison Egdahl. 

Victor Eisner, a.b. (Stanford University) 1946. 

Lindsey Thomas Elder, Jr., a.b. (University of Texas) 1950. 

Hilliard Donald Estes. 

Robert John Feldmann. 

Howard David Frank, s.b. (University of Vermont) 1947. 

Arnold Sidney Gale, a.b. 1940. 

Frank Warren Garran, Jr., a.b. (Dartmouth College) 1947. 

John Garry, a.b. (Dartmouth College) 1947. 

Renee Gelman, a.b. (Hunter College) 1945. 

Julius Eli Goldblatt, s.b. (Tufts College) 1941. 

Kenneth Merle Graham, a.b. (Allegheny College) 1941, a.m. (University of 

Illinois) 1942. 
Ralston Raymond Hannas, Jr., s.b. (Purdue University) 1939. 
Thomas Bartholomew Hayes. 

John Morrison Head, a.b. (University of Missouri) 1946. 
Dwight Carroll Hoeg, a.b. (University of Minnesota) 1947, s.b. (ibid.) 1948. 
John William Hoffman, d.m.d. 1948. 

Richard Johnson Ireton, a.b. (Ohio State University) 1946. 
John Charles Kramer. 

Bertrand Carl Kriete, a.b. (DePauvo University) 1937. 
Richard Victor Lance. 
Frank Wesley Lane, Jr. 
Leonard Laster, a.b. 1948 (1949). 
Arnold Albert Lear. 

Feung Bok Lee, s.b. (Oregon State College) 1942. 
Sheldon A4arvin Levin, a.b. (University of California) 1943. 
Edward Louis Liva, s.b. 1947 (1946). 
William Bryant Logan, Jr., s.b. (Yale University) 1946. 
John Rupert Lovelace, s.b. (Mississippi State College) 1947. 
Lee Browning Lusted, a.b. (Cornell College) 1943. 
George Adair Lyon, a.b. (Dartmouth College) 1947. 
Robert Edgar Mabe, s.b. (University of North Carolina) 1947. 
Peter Browne Macomber, a.b. (Boivdoin College) 1947. 
Edward Aloysius Mahoney, Jr., d.m.d. 1948. 
Paul Mandelstam, a.b. 1945 (1944), a.m. 1946. 
Alexander Rafajlo Margulis. 

William Fennell McNeely, s.b. (University of North Carolina) 1947. 
Lloyd William Merryfield, s.b. (California Institute of Technology) 1942, 
s.m. (ibid.) 1943. 



114 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

William Paul Miller. 

Henry Davis iVIinot, Jr., a.b. 1940 (1941). 

Marc P Moldawer. 

Lawrence Terence Moore, d.m.d. 1948. 

Arnold Stephen Morel, s.b. (St. John's University) 1942, d.m.d. {Harvard 
University) 1948. 

Robert Stier Morrison, a.b. (University of Missouri) 1946. 

Guy Owens, s.b. (Tufts College) 1946. 

John Hulbert Parks. 

William Bradford Patterson, a.b. 1943 (1942). 

Louis Nicholas Pernokas, a.b. (Dartmouth College) 1947. 

Edward Donn Piatt, Jr. 

John Vernon Pikula, s.b. (University of Florida) 1941. 

Marvin Julius Powell, s.b. 1947 (1946). 

Warren Harding Proudfoot. 

Alfredo Antonio Ramirez de Arellano, s.b. (University of Puerto Rico) 1945. 

Leon Reznick, a.b. 1946 (1945). 

William Allen Richards, s.b. 1944 (1943). 

John D Robuck, Jr. 

Herbert Gerald Rock, s.b. (New York State College for Teachers) 1941. 

Wade Rockwood. 

Merrill Herbert Ross. 

Marvin Leonard Sachs, a.b. (Yale University) 1946. 

Bahij Sulayman Salibi, b.a. (American University of Beirut) 1941, m.a. 
(ibid.) 1944. 

Norman Williams Saunders, a.b. (Dartmouth College) 1947. 

Willis Clayton Schaupp, a.b. (Stanford University) 1947. 

Edward William Schoenheit, Jr. 

Herman Arthur Schwartz, s.b. (Cornell University) 1941. 

Kenneth Louis Sears, s.b. (University of Illinois) 1940. 

Cyril Emmett Shea, Jr., a.b. (Dartmouth College) 1947. 

Daniel Roger Shields. 

Norman Joseph Sissman, a.b. (Dartmouth College) 1947. 

Dorraine Ward Slingerland, s.b. 1944 (1943). 

Richard Landis Smythe, a.b. 1947 (1946). 

James Louis Sykes. 

Evelyn Davis Waitzkin, a.b. (Radcliffe College) 1939, a.m. (Simmons Col- 
lege) 1944. 

Kenneth Francis Walker, b.a. (University of Toronto) 1946. 

Thomas English Walker, a.b. (Davidson College) 1939, a.m. (University 
of North Carolina) 1941, s.m. (ibid.) 1942. 

Thomas Japheth Whitfield, 3d. 



DEGREES I I 5 

Walter Llewellyn Wilder, a.b. (University of Minnesota) 1947, s.b. (ibid.) 

1948. 
Gordon Francis Wise. 
Richard Wolff, a.b. 1944 (1943). 
Daniel Test Young, s.b. (Guilford College) 1946. 

M.D. cum Laude for Thesis in a Special Field 

Norman Arthur Coulter, Jr., s.b. (Virginia Polytechnic Institute) 1941. 
Dwain Douglas Hagerman, a.b. (University of Colorado) 1945, s.m. (ibid.) 

1948. 
Roger Ferris White, s.b. (Kansas State College) 1940, s.m. (Washington 

State College) 1946. 

M.D. cum Laude 

Alan Clifford Aisenberg, s.b. 1946 (1945). 

Lewis Morgan Bloomingdale, s.b. (Yale University) 1940, e.b. (ibid.) 1941. 

Robert Bower. 

Thomas Evans Brittingham. r 

Cyrus Cathey Brown, Jr., a.b. (Dartftwuth College) 1947. 

John Francis Burnum, s.b. (University of Alabama) 1946. 

Robert Campbell Coe, s.b. (University of Washington) 1940. 

Richard Allan Field, a.b. 1943 (1942). 

Amasa Brooks Ford, a.b. (Yale University) 1944 (1943). 

Donald Saul Gair, s.b. 1945. 

Walter Hollander, Jr., s.b. (Haverford College) 1943. 

Kurt Julius Isselbacher. 

Avard Marion Mitchell, s.b. (Mount Union College) 1941, s.m. (Purdue 

University) 1943, ph.d. (ibid.) 1947. 
Federico Mora Castaneda. 

Maurice Patrick O'Meara, s.b. (Tufts College) 1946. 
Charles Sutherland Petty, s.b. (University of Washington) 1941, s.m. (ibid.) 

1946. 
David Butterfield Sheldon, s.b. (California Institute of Technology) 1946. 
Charles Thomas Stewart, a.b. (Stanford University) 1947. 
Thomas Franklin Williams, s.b. (University of North Carolina) ig^2, a.m. 

(Columbia University) 1943. 

M.D. Magna cum Laude for Thesis in a Special Field 
Melvin Jacob Glimcher, s.b. (Purdue University) 1946, b.s.n.e. (ibid.) 1946. 



CLASS OF JUNE 1950 
INTERNSHIPS 

Unless otherwise noted all internships start July /, ig^o for one year 



Name 

Achenbach, H. 
Aisenberg, A. C. 
Allen, R. H. 
Applegarth, A. P. 
Atherton, E. R. 
Aycock, R. R. 
Babbitt, Rayma L. 
Batts, E. E. 
Bell, E. D., Jr. 
Berlow, S. 

Bloomingdale, L. M. 
Blumberg, M. S. 
Borg, D. C. 
Bower, R. 
Brand, E. D. 
Brennan, J. T., Jr. 
Briggs, L. R., Jr. 
Brittingham, T. E. 
Broadaway, R. K. 
Brown, C. C, Jr. 
Burnum, J. F. 
Burroughs, J. T. 
Caul, E. H. 
Christie, W. E., Jr. 
Clifton, R. H. 
Coe, R. C. 
Colman, E. L. 
Coulter, N. A., Jr. 
Creedon, R. J. 
Cronkhite, L. W., Jr. 
Cummins, J. F. 
Dalton, J. C. 
Dampeer, J. O., Jr. 
Davies, F. M. 
Davis, Evelyn 
DiDomenico, V. P. 
Ducey, J. E. 
Eaton, J. H. 
Egdahl, R. H. 
Eisner, V. P. 



Hospital Service 

Boston City Surgical 

*Presbyterian, N. Y. Medical 

Henry Ford, Detroit Rotating 

University of California Research 

Charity, New Orleans Rotating 

Boston City Medical 
St. Mary's Group of Hospitals, St. Louis Rotating 

San Francisco City and County Rotating 

Boston City Medical 

Massachusetts General, Boston Pediatrics 

Beth Israel, Boston Medical 

Bellevue, N. Y. Pediatrics 

Boston City Medical 

*Philadelphia General Rotating 

U. of Virginia Hospital, Charlottesville Medical 

Roosevelt, N. Y. Surgical 

San Diego County General Rotating 

New York Medical 
Mary Imogene Bassett, Cooperstown, N. Y. Mixed 

Montreal General Mixed 

New York Medical 

Johns Hopkins Surgical 

U. of Chicago Clinics Mixed 

St. Mary's Group of Hospitals, St. Louis Rotating 
Mary Imogene Bassett, Cooperstown, N. Y. Surgical 

Massachusetts General, Boston Rotating 

*Presbyterian, Chicago Rotating 

Johns Hopkins Biophysic 

*Roosevelt, N. Y. Surgical 

Massachusetts General, Boston Medical 

Boston City Medical 

Boston City Medical 

Vanderbilt U. Hospital, Nashville Surgical 

New York Surgical 

Faulkner, Boston Rotating 

# Worcester City Rotating 

*Roosevelt, N. Y. Medical 

Stanford U. Hospital, San Francisco Surgical 

U. of Minnesota Hospital, Minneapolis Surgical 

Presbyterian, Pittsburgh Rotating 



INTERNSHIPS 



"7 



Name 

Elder, L. T. Jr. 
Estes, H. D. 
Feldmann, R. J. 
Field, R. A. 
Ford, A. B. 
Frank, H. D. 
Gair, D. S. 
Gale, A. S. 
Garran, F. W., Jr. 
Garry, J. 

Gelman, Rene L. 
Glimcher, M. J. 
Goldblatt, J. E. 
Graham, K. M. 
Hagerman, D. D. 
Hannas, R. R., Jr. 
Hayes, T. B. 
Head, J. M. 
Hoeg, D. C. 
Hoffman, J. W. 
Hollander, W., Jr. 

Ireton, R. J. 
Isselbacher, K. J. 
Kramer, J. C. 

Kriete, B. C. 
Lance, R. V. 
Lane, F. W., Jr. 
Laster, L. 
Lear, A. A. 
Lee, F. B. 
Levin, S. M. 

Liva, E. L. 
Logan, W. B., Jr. 
Lovelace, J. R. 
Lusted, L. B. 
Lyon, G. A. 
Mabe, R. E. 
Macomber, P. B. 
Mahoney, E. A., Jr. 
Mandelstam, P. 
Margulis, A. 
McNeely, W. F. 



Hospital 


Service 


Fitzsimons General, Denver 


Army-Rotating 


Los Angeles County General 


Rotating 


Tripler General, Honolulu 


Rotating 


Massachusetts General, Boston 


Medical 


Massachusetts General, Boston 


Medical 


Massachusetts Memorial, Boston 


Medical 


Peter Bent Brigham, Boston 


Medical 


Syracuse U. Medical Center 


Rotating 


Massachusetts General, Boston 


Surgical 


Mary Hitchcock Memorial, Hanover, N. H. 


Rotating 


Michael Reese, Chicago 


Rotating 


Strong Memorial, Rochester 


Surgical 


*Philadelphia General 


Rotating 


Boston City 


Medical 


Research and Educational Hospital, Chicago 


Mixed 


U. of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City 


Rotating 


St. Elizabeth's, Boston 


Rotating 


Massachusetts General, Boston 


Surgical 


Peter Bent Brigham, Boston 


Medical 


Lowell General, Lowell, Mass 


Rotating 


*Presbyterian, N. Y. 


Medical 




(10/1/50-9/30/52) 


*Presbyterian, Chicago 


Rotating 


Massachusetts General, Boston 


Medical 


*U. Hospitals, Cleveland 


Medical 




(10/15/50-11/1/52) 


Boston City 


Medical 


King County Hospital System, Seattle 


Rotating 


Boston City 


Surgical 


Massachusetts General, Boston 


Medical 


Boston City 


Medical 


Boston City 


Surgical 


*Presbyterian, N. Y. 


Surgical 




(7/1/50-1/1/52) 


Medical College of Virginia, Richmond 


Rotating 


Peter Bent Brigham, Boston 


Surgical 


Henry Ford, Detroit 


Rotating 


Massachusetts Memorial, Boston 


Medical 


Boston City 


Surgical 


Vanderbilt U. Hospital, Nashville 


Medical 


Fitzsimons General, Denver 


Rotating 


Grace-New Haven Community 


Surgical 


Beth Israel, Boston 


Medical 


Henry Ford, Detroit 


Rotating 


Boston City 


Medical 



n8 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 



Name 

Merryfield, L. W. 
Miller, W. P. 
Minot, H. D., Jr. 
Mitchell, A. M. 
Moldawer, M. 

Moore, L. T. 

Mora-Castaneda, F. 

Morel, A. S. 

Morrison, R. S. 

O'Meara, M. P. 

Owens, G. 

Parks, J. H. 

Patterson, W. B. 

Pernokas, L. N. 

Petty, C. S. 

Piatt, E. D., Jr. 

Pikula, J. V. 

Powell, M. J. 

Proudfoot, W. H. 

Ramirez de Arellano, A. A. 

Reznick, L. 

Richards, W. A. 

Robuck, J. D. 

Rock, H. G. 

Rockwood, W. 

Ross, M. H. 

Sachs, M. L. 

Salibi, B. S. 
Saunders, N. W. 
Schaupp, W. C. 
Schoenheit, E. W., Jr. 
Schwartz, H. A. 
Sears, K. L. 
Shea, C. E., Jr. 
Sheldon, D. B. 
Shields, D. R. 
Sissman, N. J. 
Slingerland, D. W. 
Smythe, R. L. 
Stewart, C. T. 
Sykes, J. L. 
Walker, K. F. 
Walker, T. E. 



Hospital 



Service 



King County Hospital System, Seattle 


Rotating 


King County Hospital System, Seattle 


Rotating 


Peter Bent Brigham, Boston 


Surgical 


Peter Bent Brigham, Boston 


Medical 


*Presbyterian, N. Y. 


Medical 




(10/1/50-9/30/52) 


Boston City 


Surgical 


Massachusetts General, Boston 


Medical 


Bellevue, N. Y. 


Surgical 


Peter Bent Brigham, Boston 


Medical 


Peter Bent Brigham, Boston 


Medical 


Vanderbilt U. Hospital, Nashville 


Surgical 


*Hartford Hospital 


Rotating 


*Peter Bent Brigham, Boston 


Surgical 


Boston City 


Surgical 


Mary Imogene Bassett, Cooperstown, N. Y 


Rotating 


Charity, New Orleans 


Rotating 


Peter Bent Brigham, Boston 


Surgical 


U. of Alberta Hospital, Edmonton 


Rotating 


Boston Marine 


Mixed 


U. of Minnesota Hospital, Minneapolis 


Medical 


Peter Bent Brigham, Boston 


Medical 


Boston City 


Pathology 


Denver General 


Rotating 


Fitzsimons General, Denver 


Rotating 


Massachusetts Memorial, Boston 


Medical 


Long Island College Hospital, Brooklyn 


Medical 


*U. Hospitals, Cleveland 


Medical 




(2/15/51-2/15/53) 


Children's, Boston 


Pathology 


*Rhode Island Hospital, Providence 


Rotating 


San Francisco City and County 


Rotating 


Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia 


Rotating 


Mt. Sinai, N. Y. 


Rotating 


*Roosevelt, N. Y. 


Medical 


St. Vincent's, N. Y. 


Surgical 


Massachusetts General, Boston 


Surgical 


Massachusetts Memorial, Boston 


Surgical 


Montefiore, Pittsburgh 


Rotating 


Strong Memorial, Rochester 


Medical 


Peter Bent Brigham, Boston 


Surgical 


U. of Minnesota Hospital, Minneapolis 


Pediatrics 


Edward Meyer Memorial, Buffalo 


Rotating 


Strong Memorial, Rochester 


Surgical 


Duke U. Hospital, Durham, N. C. 


Pediatrics 



INTERNSHIPS 



II 9 



Name 

White, R. F. 
Whitfield, T. J. 
WUder, W.L. 
Williams, T. F. 
Wise, G. F. 
Wolff, R. 
Young, D.T. 



Hospital 

Grace-New Haven Community 
*Philadclphia General 

Cleveland City 

Johns Hopkins, Baltimore 

U. S. Marine, Detroit 

Beth Israel, Boston 
* Jefferson, Philadelphia 



Service 

Pediatrics 

Rotating 

Rotating 

Medical 

Rotating 

Medical 

Rotating 



•Two-year appointment 



MEDICAL SCHOOL 



FOURTH CLASS 

Arnstein, Robert Leo, a.b. (Yale Univ.) 1941. New York, N. Y. 

Arthur, Ransom James, a.b. (Univ. of California) 1947. Eldridge, Calif. 

Atik, Mohammed, a.b. (Univ. of California) 1947. Kabul, Afghanistan 

tBaker, Lawrence Martin, 3d (Univ. of Pittsburgh, Washington Univ., and 

Harvard Coll.). Coraopolis, Pa. 

Bell, Ellen Gary, a.b. (Bryn Mawr Coll.) 1947. Haverford, Pa. 

JBell, George Alan (Univ. of Tennessee). Chehalis, Wash. 

§Bellis, John Marvin, Jr. (Coll. of William and Mary). Frederick, Md. 
HJBikorT, David Marvin (Univ. of Vermont and Univ. of Michigan) , d.m.d. 

(Harvard University) 1949. Brooklyn,N.Y. 

§Boomer, Robert Bruce (Massachusetts Inst, of Technology and Univ. of 

Idaho). Pay ette, Idaho 

*Bossi, Eugene Edmund, a.b. (Dartmouth Coll.) 1948 [Dartmouth Medical 

School]. West Roxbury 

Bradshaw, John Schwab, a.b. (Oberlin Coll.) 1947. Oberlin, Ohio 

flBryan, James Elliott, a.b. (Wesley an Univ.) 1946, d.m.d. (Harvard Uni- 
versity) 1949. Bridgeport, Conn. 
*Bullard, Hoke Vogler, Jr., s.b. (Univ. of North Carolina) 1948 [Univ. of 

North Carolina Medical School]. Charlotte, N. C. 

*Burke, John Francis, s.b. (Univ. of Illinois) 194J [Univ. of Illinois Medical 

School]. Chicago, III. 

Burke, Sean Kevin, a.b. (Williams Coll.) 1946. Holyoke 

Cain, Arthur James, a.b. (Boston Univ.) 1944, a.m. (ibid.) 1947. Lynn 

Campbell, Joseph Edward, a.b. (Texas Christian Univ.) 1947. Tyler, Texas 
Chaney, Robert Horace, a.b. (Univ. of California) 1942. Lodi, Calif. 

Chapman, Robert Galbraith, a.b. (Yale Univ.) 1947. 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Clapp, Paul, s.b. (United States Naval Academy) 1944. Missoula, Mont. 
*Clark, Theodore Rust, a.b. (Dartmouth Coll.) 1948 [Dartmouth Medical 

School]. West Newton 

Damon, Albert, a.b. 1938, ph.d. (Univ. of Chicago) 1946. Newton 

Danforth, William Henry, a.b. (Princeton Univ.) 1947. Clayton, Mo. 

Davis, Robert Paul, a.b. 1947. Dorchester 

t Admitted on basis of two years' college work. 

t Admitted on basis of three years' college work. 

§ Admitted on basis of four years' college work (in several cases work for the degree completed). 

Transferred to second year class. 

^ Transferred to third year class from Harvard School of Dental Medicine. *■ 

* Transferred to third year class. 



STUDENTS. FOURTH CLASS I 2 I 

tDawson, Jean Patricia {Univ. of California). Berkeley, Calif. 

*DeForest, Robert Elliott, a.b. (Dartmouth Coll.) 1948 [Dartmouth A4edical 
School]. Burlington, Vt. 

DiRaimondo, Vincent Charles, s.b. (Beloit Coll.) 1943, s.m. (Univ. of Wis- 
consin) 1944. Rockford, 111. 

Dreyfus, Edward Goulston, a.b. 1940. Boston 

Early, Robert Lawrence, s.b. (Michigan State Coll.) 1943. Lansing, Mich. 

°Efron, Alary Louise, a.b. (Barnard Coll.) 1947 [Columbia Univ. Coll. of 
Physicians and Surgeons]. Elmhurst, Long Island, N. Y. 

Ellison, Arthur Ellsworth, 3d, a.b. (Williams Coll.) 1946. Richmond, Va. 

Elser, Otto Helmut, a.b. (New York Univ.) 1942. Independence, Mo. 

*Fahey, John Leslie (John Carroll Univ. and Ohio State Univ.) [Wayne 
Univ. Coll. of Medicine], Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

Fernald, Willard Barker, a.b. (Brown Univ.) 1947. Upper Montclair, N. J. 

{Field, James Bernard (Harvard Coll.). Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Fischbein, Jerome Wollison, a.b. 1947. East Orange, N. J. 

*Fordham, Christopher Columbus, 3d (Univ. of North Carolina) [Univ. of 
North Carolina Medical School]. Greensboro, N. C. 

{Foster, Gerald Sidney (Allegheny Coll.). Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Fraser, Glendon Chisholm, s.b. (Western Reserve Univ.) 1947. 

South Euclid, Ohio 

*Fromm, Stephen Robert, s.b. (Indiana Univ.) 1948 [Indiana Univ. Medical 
School]. New York, N. Y. 

tFrothingham, Thomas Eliot (Harvard Coll.). Boston 

JGaldston, Richard (Univ. of Wisconsin and Univ. of Chicago). 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

jGarrett, John Joseph, Jr. (Niagara Univ.). New Hartford, N. Y. 

Gauchat, Robert David, a.b. 1944 (1947). Warren, Ohio 

Geschwind, Norman, a.b. 1946 (1947). Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Ginandes, Shepard Coleman, a.b. 1947. Neponsit, N. Y. 

Goodrich, Charles Howard, 2d, a.b. (Princeton Univ.) 1947. Hingham 

Gordon, Marvin Lee, a.b. (Miami Univ.) 1946. Columbus, Ohio 

Gould, John Charles, a.b. 1947. Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Gravallese, Michael Angelo, Jr., a.b. 1947. Boston 

Greenbaum, James Kennedy, a.b. (Princeton Univ.) 1942. Kittanning, Pa. 

*Guattery, Joseph Michael, a.b. (Dartmouth Coll.) 1948 [Dartmouth Medi- 
cal School]. Middletown, N. Y. 

Hayes, David, s.b. 1947. New Canaan, Conn. 

Haymond, Thomas Arnette, a.b. 1947. Fairmont, W. Va. 

Haynes, Walter Marion, Jr., s.b. (Univ. of Florida) 1947. Sanford, Fla. 

*Hess, Helen Hope, a.b. (West Virgina Univ.) 1946 [West Virginia Univ. 
School of Medicine]. Morgantown, W. Va. 



122 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

*Heusinkveld, David William, Jr., a.b. (Dartmouth Coll.) 1948 [Dartmouth 

Medical School]. Cincinnati, Ohio 

Hiebert, Clement Arthur, a.b. (Bowdoin Coll.) 1947. Lewiston, Maine 

JHolloman, Jeff Joe, s.b. (Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical Coll.) 

1948. Frederick, Okla. 

HHoye, Stephen Joseph, a.b. (Dartmouth Coll.) 1946(1948), d.m.d. (Harvard 

University) 1949. East Detroit, Mich. 

Hudson, Bruce Herndon, a.b. (Oberlin Coll.) 1947. Athens, Ohio 

Hutchison, George Barkley, a.b. 1943. Ferry Point, Md. 

Jefferson, Mildred Fay, a.b. (Texas Coll.) 1945, s.m. (Tufts Coll.) 1947. 

Boston 
§Jencks, William Piatt (Harvard Coll.). Taos, N. Mex. 

t Jones, Richard Lee (Univ. of Southern California) . Los Angeles, Calif. 
Jones, Wilfred Fuller, Jr., a.b. (Brown Univ.) 1943. South Hadley 

Karlen, William Sidney, a.b. 1947. Newark, N. J. 

*Kellum, Jesse Blake, s.b. (Univ. of Mississippi) 1948 [Univ. of Mississippi 

Medical School]. Tupelo, Miss. 

Kiely, Brian, a.b. 1943. Cincinnati, Ohio 

Kirn, George John, s.b. 1945 (1946). Council Bluffs, Iowa 

*Kleaveland, Richard Norman (Iowa State Coll.) [Northwestern Univ. 

Medical School]. Sioux Rapids, Iowa 

Kliewer, David Donald, s.b. (Wheaton Coll.) 1939. Lakeview, Oregon 

Krakauer, Lewis Joseph, a.b. (Williams Coll.) 1947. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Kushnick, Theodore, s.b. (Ohio State Univ.) 1944, s.m. (ibid.) 1947. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
*Labbe, Joseph Paul, s.b. (Univ. of New Hampshire) 1947 [Johns Hopkins 

Univ. School of Medicine]. Dover, N. H. 

Lacy, William White, s.b. (Davidson Coll.) 1947. Richmond, Va. 

Lamdin, Ezra, a.b. 1947. Cleveland, Ohio 

§Lohnes, Willard Erwin ( V anderbilt Univ. and State Univ. of Iowa) . 

Waterloo, Iowa 
Ludwick, John Phillip, a.b. 1947. Jackson, Mich. 

Lyon, Wilbur Harvey, Jr., a.b. (Coll. of Wooster) 1948. Bombay, India 
Manson, William Gresham, a.b. 1941. Murfreesboro, Tenn. 

*Marsh, Spinks Hamilton, s.b. (Duke Univ.) 1945 [Univ. of North Carolina 

School of Medicine]. Monroe, N. C. 

{Matthews, Homer Burtis (Grinnell Coll. and Univ. of Chicago). 

Chicago, III. 
§iMay, Harold Louis (Harvard Coll.). Foughkeepsie, N. Y. 

*Mayo, Richard Avery, a.b. (Dartmouth Coll.) 1948 [Dartmouth Medical 

School], * Ballard Vale 

tMcDuffie, Frederic Clement (Harvard Coll.). Andover 



STUDENTS. FOURTH CLASS I 23 

Meadows, Paul McDonnald, a.b. (State Univ. of Iowa) 1947. 

Siloam Springs, Iowa 
fMoore, Robert Francis (Boston Univ.). Somerville 

Murphey, Bradford Griffin, a.b. 1946. Denver, Colo. 

Murphy, George Byrd, Jr., a.b. (Univ. of Virginia) 1946. 

Stephenville, Texas 
*Neely, William Augustus, a.b. (Univ. of Mississippi) 1942 [Univ. of 

Mississippi School of Medicine]. Banks, Miss. 

Nevis, Arnold Hastings, s.b. (California hist, of Technology) 1947. 

Glendale, Calif. 
JNielsen, Robert Louis (Montana State Univ.). Missoula, Mont. 

*Norris, Franklin Gray, s.b. (Duke Univ.) 1947 [Univ. of North Carolina 

School of Medicine]. Asheville, N. C. 

Novick, Alvin, a.b. 1947. Flushing, N. Y. 

Oates, Robert George, a.b. (Princeton Univ.) 1947. Parker sburg, W. Va. 
Olson, Robert Eugene, a.b. (Gustavus Adolphus Coll.) 1938, ph.d. (St. Louis 

Univ.) 1944. Minneapolis, Minn. 

jPalladino, Neal Mario (Union Coll.). Bloomfield, N. J. 

Parker, John Eversole, s.b. (California Inst, of Technology) 1938. 

Pasadena, Calif. 
Peebles, Thomas Chalmers, s.b. 1942. Boston 

Perrin, George Midwood, a.b. (Williams Coll.) 1947. Wellesley Hills 

KtPlum, George Elwood (West Virginia Univ. and Univ. of Virginia), 

d.m.d. (Harvard University) 1949. Tunnelton, W. Va. 

*Quackenbush, Arthur Charles, a.b. (Univ. of North Carolina) 1947 [Univ. 

of North Carolina School of Medicine]. Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Reid, Robert Clay, a.b. (Univ. of Missouri) 1947. Peculiar, Mo. 

Reusch, Donald Carlyle, a.b. 1947. Fort Thomas, Ky. 

Richardson, David Walthall, s.b. (Davidson Coll.) 1947. Richmond, Va. 

§Richter, Tor (Univ. of Chicago, Univ. of Michigan, and Univ. of Minne- 
sota). Chicago, 111. 
Robey, John Stevens, a.b. 1947. Ca?nbridge 
Roth, Dover, a.b. (Texas Coll. of Mines and Metallurgy) 1947. 

El Paso, Texas 
Rowe, John Charles, a.b. (Colgate Univ.) 1947. Dunkirk, N. Y. 

Rubinstein, Norman Edward, a.b. (Univ. of Wisconsin) 1947. 

New York, N. Y. 
ffSchonfeld, Murry David, s.b. (Ohio State Univ.) 1944, d.m.d. (Harvard 

University ) 1 949. Kew Gardens, Long Island, N. Y. 

Sears, Jane Bowen, a.b. (Wellesley Coll.) 1947. Harrodsburg, Ky. 

Shaffer, Frederick Gaylord, a.b. (West Virginia Univ.) 1947. 

Nestorville, W. Va. 



124 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

*Simpson, William Ford, a.b. {Univ. of Alabama) 1947 [Univ. of Alabama 
Medical School]. Montgomery, Ala. 

Singh, Madan Mohan, b.sc. (Patna Univ., India) 1942, m.sc. (ibid.) 1944. 

Gay a, India 

Skinner, Alfred Loring, Jr., a.b. 1947. Needham 

Sluis, Joost, s.b. (Massachusetts Inst, of Technology) 1947, s.m. (ibid.) 1947. 

Modesto, Calif. 

Snow, David Bruce, a.b. 1947. Manchester, N. H. 

*Stallard, Sam Kane, a.b. (Univ. of North Carolina) 1947 [Univ. of North 
Carolina School of Medicine]. Gate City, Va. 

Stanford, John, a.b. (Amherst Coll.) 1947. Essex, Conn. 

*Stetson, John Blank (Univ. of Chicago and Univ. of Nebraska), [Wash- 
ington Univ. School of Medicine]. Chicago, III. 

Strober, Murray, a.b. (Columbia Univ.) 1948. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Suit, Elizabeth Hogan, a.b. (Univ. of California) 1947. Stockton, Calif. 

JSult, Francis Laurance (Univ. of Idaho and Coll. of Idaho). Cascade, Idaho 

Summer, George Kendrick, s.b. (Univ. of North Carolina) 1944. 

Cherryville, N. C. 

*Tetirick, Jack Elmer, a.b. (Ohio State Univ.) 1948 [Ohio State Univ. Coll. 
of Medicine] . Columbus, Ohio 

Tisdale, William Allen, s.b. (Univ. of Florida) 1947. Gainsville, Fla. 

Toll, Giles Darwin, a.b. (Williams Coll.) 1947. Denver, Colo. 

JTomchick, Frederick Stephen (Jr. Coll. of Connecticut and Univ. of 
Connecticut). Fairfield, Conn. 

# Totherow, William Roy, s.b. (Univ. of North Carolina) 1948 [Univ. of 
North Carolina School of Medicine]. Asheville, N. C. 

Tully, Bernard Michael, s.b. (Univ. of Mia?ni) 1947. Chicago, III. 

Tuttle, Elbert Parr, Jr., a.b. (Princeton Univ.) 1942. Atlanta, Ga. 

Udall, Addison Richard, s.b. (Brigham Young Univ.) 1947. 

Thatcher, Ariz. 

Vickery, Clement Clifford, a.b. (Whitman Coll.) 1946. Akron, Ohio 

Watson, Paul Louis, a.b. (Cornell Coll.) 1947. Council Bluffs, Ioiva 

Weiner, Aaron David, a.b. (Brooklyn Coll.) 1940. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

t Weiss, Ruth Stern (Radcliffe Coll.). Newton Center 

$ Wheeler, Henry Orson, Jr. (California Inst, of Technology, Harvard 
Coll., and Massachusetts Inst, of Technology). Los Angeles, Calif. 

Wilmer, Edward Pancoast, a.b. (Williams Coll.) 1947. Granville, N. Y. 

Wingate, James Harmon, s.b. (Univ. of Washington)* 1947. 

Tacoma, Wash. 

*Wiygul, Frank Mitchell, Jr., s.b. (Univ. of Mississippi) 1948 [Univ. of 
Mississippi School of Medicine]. Shannon, Miss. 

Woodbury, Michael Aime, a.b. 1945 (1949). Beverly Hills, Calif. 



STUDENTS. THIRD CLASS I 25 

$ Woodward, George Hartley (Dartmouth Coll.). Weston 

Yaffee, Howard Stanley, a.b. (Syracuse Univ.) 1947. Cambridge 

Yanagi, Glenn Noriyuki, a.b. (Columbia Univ.) 1944, a.m. (Harvard Univ.) 
1945, ph.d. (ibid.) 1947. Honolulu, Hawaii 

Zoglin, Stanton Francis, s.b. 1947. Kansas City, Mo. 

Zukoski, Charles Fredrick, 3d, a.b. (Univ. of North Carolina) 1947. 

Mt. Brook, Ala. 

THIRD CLASS 

$Aikman, William Oakley (Univ. of Florida and Harvard Coll.) 

Cazenovia, N. Y. 
jAndersen, James Gordon (Univ. of Colorado). Brush, Colo. 

Anderson, Albert Douglas, a.b. (Columbia Univ.) 1948. New York, N. Y. 
Atkins, Harold Lewis, s.b. (Yale Univ.) 1948. Belleville, N. J. 

*Ayvazian, John Haig, a.b. (Dartmouth Coll.) 1949 [Dartmouth Medical 

School] . Flushing, Long Island, N. Y. 

Bartman, Richard Edward, a.b. (Wesley an Univ.) 1948. Hartford, Conn. 
Bascom, George Sparhawk, s.b. (Kansas State Coll.) 1948. 

Manhattan, Kans. 
*Berg, Robert Benjamin, a.b. (Dartmouth Coll.) 1949 [Dartmouth Medical 

School] New York, N. Y. 

Berk, James Lawrence, a.b. 1948. Akron, Ohio 

JBernstein, Eugene A. (Harvard Coll.). Los Angeles, Calif. 

Bernstein, James Stuart, a.b. 1949 (1948). Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Bertles, John Francis, s.b. (Yale Univ.) 1945. Atlanta, Ga. 

Branaman, William Steven, s.b. (Univ. of Arizona) 1943. Florence, Ariz. 
{Brown, Frederick Ronald, Jr. (Bowdoin Coll. and McGill Univ.). 

Winchester 
JBrown, Owen Lester (Univ. of Kentucky and Tulsa Univ.). 

Russell Springs, Ky. 
Bryan, Patricia Coghlan, a.b. (Trinity Coll.) 1948. Atlanta, Ga. 

Buchanan, William Roderick, Jr., a.b. (Yale Univ.) 1948. Athol 

fiButler, Richard Lundy, a.b. (Coe Coll.) 1947, d.m.d. (Harvard University) 

1950. Marshalltown, Iowa 

*Byerly, Wesley Grimes, Jr., a.b. (Univ. of North Carolina) 1948 [Univ. of 

North Carolina School of Medicine]. Lenoir, N. C. 

Calladine, Ruth Arlene, s.b. (Univ. of Chicago) 1948. Woodstock, 111. 

Carlton, Lawrence Sumner, Jr., a.b. 1946 (1948). Cambridge 

t Admitted on basis of two years' college work. 

+ Admitted on basis of three years' college work. 

§ Admitted on basis of four years' college work (in several cases work for degree completed). 

Transferred to second year class. 

f Transferred to third year class from Harvard School of Dental Medicine. 

* Transferred to third year class. 



126 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

*Cather, Carl Henry, Jr., a.b. (West Virginia Univ.) 1948, s.b. (ibid.) 1950 

[West Virginia Medical School] . Morgantown, W. Va. 

*tChano\vicz, Regina Rachel (Univ. of Moscow, Virginia Polytechnic Inst., 

Simmons Coll.) [Univ. of Moscow Medical School, Lodz Univ. Medical 

School]. Stockholm, Sweden 

Chiat, Harold, a.b. (Columbia Univ.) 1948. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

*$Churchwell, Alfred Grigg (Vanderbilt Univ.) [Univ. of Tennessee Coll. 

of Medicine]. Savannah, Tenn. 

tClawson, David Kay (Univ. of Utah). Salt Lake City, Utah 

*Cobbs, Beverly Woodfin, Jr., a.b. (Vanderbilt Univ.) 1949 [Vanderbilt 

Univ. School of Medicine]. Montgomery, Ala. 

Cochran, William Davis, a.b. 1945 (1948). Cambridge 

Coleman, Marshall Donald, a.b. 1948. Utica, N. Y. 

iCollins, Herschel Douglas (Univ. of Maine). Caribou, Maine 

Conkling, Frederic Everett, 3d, s.b. (Univ. of Florida) 1947. Miami, Fla. 
Constable, John Davidson, a.b. 1947 (1948). Cambridge 

JCostanzo, Frank Anthony (Yale Univ.). Lakewood, Ohio 

§Cummings, Rial Wheeler (Montana State Univ. and Carroll Coll.). 

Plains, Mont. 
Curran, William Sheldon, a.b. 1947 (1948). Brooklyn, N. Y. 

jCurtin, Richard Reed (Swarthmore Coll.). Webster Springs, W. Va. 

*Day, Samuel Kirby, Jr., s.b. (Univ. of Missisisppi) 1949 [Univ. of Mississippi 

School of Medicine]. Inverness, Miss. 

Donovan, James Frederic, a.b. (Univ. of Maine) 1948. Houlton, Maine 

Dowling, James Thomas, s.b. (Univ. of Washington) 1948. Seattle, Wash. 
Drewry, Garth Richard, s.b. (Yale Univ.) 1948. Springfield 

^Dudley, Hugh Robert, Jr. (Harvard Coll.). Huntington, W. Va. 

Efron, Robert, a.b. (Columbia Univ.) 1948. Elmhurst, Long Island, N. Y. 
*Feeney, James Joseph, a.b. (Dartmouth Coll.) 1949 [Dartmouth Medical 

School] . Blue Island, III. 

fftFeldman, Merrill Irving (Univ. of New Hampshire), d.m.d. (Harvard ' 

University) 1950. Brighton 

Fornshell, Robert Pearce, a.b. 1947 (1948). Kent, Ohio 

jGianelli, Stanley, Jr. (Yale Univ.). West Haven, Conn. 

* Gordon, Gerald Stanford, s.b. (Univ. of Chicago) 1948 [Univ. of Missouri 

School of Medicine]. St. Joseph, Mo. 

Grinker, Roy Richard, Jr., ph.b. (Univ. of Chicago) 1947. Chicago, III. 

*Grow, Buel King, Jr., s.b. (Univ. of North Carolina) 1949 [Univ. of North 

Carolina School of Medicine]. Raleigh, N.C. 

Grunebaum, Henry Ulmann, a.b. 1948. Scarsdale, N. Y. 

tGuntheroth, Warren Gaden (Harvard Univ.). Tulsa, Okla. 

Hancock, Ernest William, a.b. (Univ. of Nebraska) 1948. Lincoln, Nebr. 



STUDENTS. THIRD CLASS I 27 

*Hendren, William Hardy, 3d, a.b. {Dartmouth Coll.) 1948 [Dartmouth 
Medical School]. Kansas City, Mo. 

jHinshaw, Horton Corwin, Jr. (Carleton Coll. and Univ. of Minnesota). 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Hobart, Kent Haessler, a.b. (Univ. of Illinois) 1948. Champaign, 111. 

Hubon, iMollie Jean, a.b. (Wellesley Coll.) 1948. Brooklyn,N.Y. 

Huggins, Charles Edward, ph.b. (Univ. of Chicago) 1947. Chicago, III. 

*Huneycutt, Joel Broadus, a.b. (Univ. of North Carolina) 1948 [Univ. of 
North Carolina School of Medicine]. Albemarle, N . C. 

*Jackson, Benjamin Brown, s.b. (Univ. of Alabama) 1949 [Medical College 
of Alabama]. Jasper, Ala. 

Johnson, Thomas William, s.b. (Univ. of Washington) 1948. 

Spokane, Wash. 

*Joyner, William Stafford, s.b. (Davidson Coll.) 1948 [Univ. of North Caro- 
lina School of Medicine], Kernersville,N. C. 

Jurkiewicz, Maurice John, d.d.s. (Univ. of Maryland) 1946. 

Bellows Falls, Vt. 

°Kaplan, Melvin Hyman, a.b. 1942 [Yale Medical School]. Cambridge 

*Katz, Samuel Lawrence, a.b. (Dartmouth Coll.) 1949 [Dartmouth Medical 
School] . Manchester, N. H. 

*Kearsley, Richard Bitere, a.b. (Dartmouth Coll.) 1949 [Dartmouth Medical 
School] . Plymouth 

JKeith, Laurel Eugene, s.b. (Univ. of Michigan) 1948. Cassopolis, Mich. 

*tKelemen, Peter (Massachusetts Inst, of Technology and Harvard Univ.) 
[Medical College of Budapest]. Budapest, Hungary 

*Kelley, Edward Thomas, Jr., a.b. (Dartmouth Coll.) 1948 [Dartmouth Med- 
ical School]. Athens, N.Y. 

$Kent, Stanley Webber (Univ. of Colorado). Buena Vista, Colo. 

King, Merrill Jenks, a.b. (Hamilton Coll.) 1948. Wellesley Hills 

*Kirkland, John Alvin, s.b. (Univ. of North Carolina) 1948 [Univ. of North 
Carolina School of Medicine]. Wilson, N.C. 

JKlee, Gerald D'Arcy (McGill Univ. and Princeton Univ.) . 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

$Kraus, William Ludwig (St. Stephan Coll., Munich Univ., and Harvard 
Coll.). NewRochelle,N. Y. 

Lamdin, Susanne Ehrentheil, a.b. (Radcliffe Coll.) 1948. Boston 

Lance, Kendrick Paige, a.b. (Princeton Univ.) 1948. Rahway, N. J. 

Lefemine, Armand Angelo, s.b. (Coll. of the Holy Cross) 1948. 

Windsor Locks, Conn. 

*Leinbach, Laurence Brickenstein, a.b. (Univ. of North Carolina) 1948 
[Univ. of North Carolina School of Medicine]. Winston-Sale?n,N.C. 

Leman, Craig Billings, a.b. (Univ. of Chicago) 1946. Chicago, III. 



128 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

Lichtenstein, Robert, ph.b. (Univ. of Chicago) 1947. Chicago, 111. 

*Lindley, John Ellis, s.b. {Univ. of Mississippi) 1950 [Univ. of Mississippi 
School of Medicine]. Macon, Miss. 

Loesch, John George, a.b. (Princeton Univ.) 1948. Westfield, N. J. 

Loop, John Wickwire, s.b. (Univ. of Wyoming) 1948. Belvidere, 111. 

IfLorber, Mortimer, s.b. (New York Univ.) 1945, d.m.d. (Harvard Uni- 
versity) 1950. New York, N.Y. 

ILuessenhop, Alfred John (Yale Univ.). Westfield, N. J. 

Lundborg, Bradford Wellington, a.b. (Stanford Univ.) 1948. 

Atherton, Calif. 

JMacDonald, Donald Paul (Harvard Univ.). Cambridge 

Malcolm, John Alfred, a.b. 1948. Bronxville, N. Y. 

*Martin, Dan Anderson, s.b. (Univ. of North Carolina) 1949 [Univ. of 
North Carolina School of Medicine] . Raleigh, N. C. 

Martin, John Joseph, s.b. (Univ. of Massachusetts) 1948. Adams 

JMerkley, Ralph G. (Univ. of Utah). Salt Lake City, Utah 

Mero, Kathleen, a.b. (Barnard Coll.) 1948. New York, N. Y. 

Michener, David Paul, a.b. (Antioch Coll.) 1948. Yellow Springs, Ohio 

Moersch, Richard Norval, a.b. (Dartmouth Coll.) 1948. Rochester, Minn. 

Mogul, Samuel Louis, a.b. 1949 (1948). Atlanta, Ga. 

*Moore, William Locke, s.b. (Univ. of North Carolina) 1949 [Univ. of 
North Carolina School of Medicine] . Greensboro, N. C. 

Morgan, William Lionel, Jr., a.b. (Yale Univ.) 1948. Honolulu, Hawaii 

tMurphy, James William (Harvard Univ.). Rhinebeck, N. Y. 

Myers, Joseph Henry, a.b. (Hiram Coll.) 1948. Cleveland, Ohio 

tNeher, Frederick James (Coll. of Puget Sound and Harvard Coll.). 

St. Paul, Minn. 

Ottenberg, Bernard Perry, a.b. 1948. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Palubinskas, Alphonse John Bernard, s.b. (Oberlin Coll.) 1948. Lowell 

{Pauling, Linus Carl, Jr. (Univ. of California, Pasadena Jr. Coll. and 
Pomona Coll.). Pasadena, Calif. 

Pierce, Chester Middlebrook, a.b. 1948. Glen Cove, N. Y. 

Pittman, James Allen, Jr., s.b. (Davidson Coll.) 1*948. Orlando, Fla. 

Potter, Robert Tillinghast, a.b. 1946 (1948). New York, N. Y. 

Rachlin, William Selig, s.b. (Princeton Univ.) 1948. New Britain, Conn. 

Radebaugh, John Franklin, Jr., s.b. (Bates Coll.) 1948. Springfield 

Rasmussen, Howard, a.b. (Gettysburg Coll.) 1948. Washington, D. C. 

Reese, Jack Wheeling, s.b. (Massachusetts Inst, of Technology) 1943. 

Ebensberg, Pa. 

JReichard, John Francis (Princeton Univ. and Harvard Coll.). 

New York, N. Y. 

Rigler, Stanley Paul, a.b. (Univ. of Minnesota) 1948. St. Paul, Minn. 



STUDENTS. THIRD CLASS I 29 

Rinaldo, Joseph Anthony, Jr., s.b. 1946 (1948). Cambridge 

Rosa-Perez, Cesar Emilio, s.b. {Univ. of Puerto Rico) 1948. 

Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 

Royaltey, Harold Hodge, Jr., a.b. (Univ. of Arizona) 1948 (1949). 

Tucson, Arizona 

Rubinstein, Jack Herbert, a.b. (Columbia Univ.) 1947. New York, N. Y. 

$Ryan, Kenneth John (Williams Coll. and Northwestern Univ.). 

Savana, III. 

Salisbury, Arthur John, s.b. (Yale Univ.) 1948. North Platte, Nebr. 

Samelson, Leo, ph.b. (Univ. of Chicago) 1948. Chicago, III. 

Segal, Stanton, a.b. (Princeton Univ.) 1948. Camden, N. J. 

Senft, Alfred, a.b. (Univ. of California) 1948. Billiitgs, Mont. 

Shapiro, Paul Bamberger, a.b. (Williams Coll.) 1948. Paterson, U. J. 

{Sharp, Robert Farnsworth (Pennsylvania State Coll. and Univ. of Utah). 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

Shillito, John, Jr., a.b. 1945 (1947). Chestnut Hill 

Smith, William Frederick, s.b. (Western Reserve Univ.) 1948. 

Cleveland, Ohio 

*Spruiell, Vann Erwin, s.b. (Univ. of Alabama) 1948 [Medical College of 
Alabama]. Leeds, Ala. 

Sturtevant, Vaughan Raymond, a.b. (Univ. of Maine) 1947. 

Livermore Falls, Maine 

Taber, Ben-Zion, a.b. (Brown Univ.) 1948. Providence, R. I. 

JTeel, Peter (Montana State Univ. and American Univ. of Beirut). 

Poison, Mont. 

Thomas, John Barry, s.b. (Yale Univ.) 1948. Hartford, Conn. 

JThorlakson, Neil Frederick (Univ. of Washington). Seattle, Wash. 

*Turner, John Jacob, a.b. (Dartmouth Coll.) 1949 [Dartmouth Medical 
School] . Youngstown, Ohio 

Twitchell, Dorothy, a.b. (Univ. of California) 1948. Owatonna, Minn. 

JVanderveen, James Leo (Vanderbilt Univ.). Orlando, Fla. 

*tWang, Yang (Yenching Univ., Fu-Jen Univ., and St. John's Univ.) [Na- 
tional Medical College of Shanghai]. Peiping, China 

Watkins, Lee Clifford, Jr., s.b. 1948. Savannah, Ga. 

Webster, Henry deForest, a.b. (Amherst Coll.) 1948. Bedford Hills, N. Y. 

% Wheeler, Hewitt Brownell (Vanderbilt Univ.). Nashville, Tenn. 

White, Arthur Clinton, s.b. (Univ. of Kentucky) 1947. Williamsburg, Ky. 

JWilber, Joseph Anthony (St. Bonaventure Coll. and Boston Coll.). 

Ja?naica Plain 

Wilson, Lewis Grant, a.b. 1948. Pasadena, Calif- 

*W T iseman, Hollis Jay, s.b. (Univ. of Alabama) 1948 [Louisiana State Univ. 
School of Medicine]. New Orleans, La. 



I30 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 



SECOND CLASS 

Adelstein, Stanley James, s.b. (Massachusetts Inst, of Technology) 1949, 
s.m. (ibid.) 1949. New York, N. Y. 

Andrews, Richard Phillips, s.b. (Denison Univ.) 1949. Dayton, Ohio 

fAndrus, William Wyman (Montana State Univ.). Missoula, Mont. 

Arvidson, Rolf, a.b. (Grinnell Coll.) 1948. Holmetr and, Norway 

Barker, Walter Lee, s.b. 1949. Chicago, 111. 

Bauer, Charles Henry, a.b. (Columbia Univ.) 1949. New York, N. Y. 

BikofT, Phyllis Mae, a.b. (Mount Holyoke Coll.) 1949. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
°fBorst, Hans Georg (Munich Univ.) [Munich Univ. Medical School]. 

Munich, Germany 
Bromberg, Philip Allan, s.b. (Queens Coll.) 1949. Queens Village, N. Y. 

Cadigan, John Bertrand, Jr., a.b. 1949. Dorchester 

Carter, Edwin Lee, a.b. (Washington and Jefferson Coll.) 1949. 

Wellsburg, W. Va. 
JChesnut, Roy William, Jr. (Harvard Coll.). Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Clark, John Gordon, Jr., a.b. (Macalester Coll.) 1949. Rockville, Minn. 

Coggs, Granville Coleridge, s.b. (Univ. of Nebraska) 1949. 

Little Rock, Ark. 
Cohen, Nathaniel, a.b. 1949. East Boston 

Cohn, Zanvil Alexander, s.b. (Bates Coll.) 1948. 

Amityville, Long Island, N. Y. 
Coley, Geoffrey Macdonell, a.b. (Yale Univ.) 1949. Sharon, Conn. 

Colombo, Frank Vincent, a.b. 1949. Everett 

Coulson, Walter, a.b. 1949. Lawrence 

Crisp, Norman William, Jr., a.b. (Dartmouth Coll.) 1949. Nashua, N. H. 
Davidoff, Helen Ordway, a.b. (Radcliffe Coll.) 1949. New Canaan, Conn. 
iDitmore, Harry Boaz, Jr. (V anderbilt Univ.). Marshall, N. C. 

Dolan, Thomas Francis, Jr., a.b. 1949. Arlington 

Drvaric, Emil Joseph, s.b. 1949. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Earle, Arthur Scott, a.b. 1948. Cambridge 

Eaton, David Ayers, a.b. (Amherst Coll.) 1949. W oonsocket, R. I. 

Eisenman, George, a.b. 1949. New York, N. Y. 

Erwin, Joseph Crowder, a.b. (Wofford Coll.) 1949. Rutherfordton, N. C. 
Feder, Ned, a.b. 1948, a.m. 1949. New York, N. Y. 

Federman, Daniel David, a.b. 1949. New York, N. Y. 

Ferejohn, George Arthur, a.b. (Cornell Univ.) 1949. New York, N. Y. 

Ferguson, Edward Loring, a.b. (Wesley an Univ.) 1949. Holyoke f 

t Admitted on basis of two years' college work. 

* Admitted on basis of three years' college work. 

§ Admitted on basis of four years' college work (in several cases work for the degree completed). 

Transferred to second year class. 



r 



STUDENTS. SECOND CLASS I 3 I 

Ficarra, Virgil Frank, s.b. (Massachusetts Inst, of Technology) 1949. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
tFletcher, Robert Glenn (Univ. of Illinois). Elgin, III. 

tFordham, Henry Clendenin (Univ. of North Carolina). 

Greensboro, N. C. 
Forrester, James Waldrip, s.b. (United States Naval Academy) 1944. 

Greenville, S. C. 
Frazier, Howard Stanley, ph.b. (Univ. of Chicago) 1947. Champaign, III. 
JGelfand, Mathew Israel (Wesley an Univ.). Hartford, Conn. 

Goldman, Arthur George, a.b. (Boston Coll.) 1949. Mattapan 

Gray, David Henry, a.b. (Princeton Univ.) 1949. New Canaan, Conn. 

Haddon, William, s.b. (Massachusetts Inst, of Technology) 1949. Boston 
Hadley, William Brown, a.b. (Brown Univ.) 1949. Canton, Ohio 

Halley, Max Martin, a.b. 1949. Olean, N. Y . 

Hansen, Frederik Christian, Jr., s.b. (Coll. of Puget Sound) 1949. 

Tacoma, Wash. 
Harter, John Gamble, a.b. (Ohio State Univ.) 1949. Columbus, Ohio 

Hoskins, Robert Graham, a.b. (Haverford Coll.) 1949. Waban 

Hotchkiss, John Ellsworth, Jr., a.b. (Yale Univ.) 1949. Wallingford, Conn. 
JHughes, Calvin Thomas, Jr. (Yale Univ.). Cheshire, Conn. 

tHughes, Richard Elmer (Harvard Coll.). East Orange, N. J. 

Ito, Tomiko, a.b. (Radcliffe Coll.) 1949. Riverside, Calif. 

Kahn, Alvin, a.b. 1949. Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Kaitz, Alan Lewis, a.b. 1948. Chelsea 

Karmason, Marilyn Gloria, a.b. (Barnard Coll.) 1949. New York, N. Y. 
Katz, Jay Harris, a.b. (Columbia Univ.) 1948. New York, N. Y. 

Katzman, Robert, s.b. (Univ. of Chicago) 1949. Denver, Colo. 

$Kinter, William Boardman (Swarthmore Coll.). Pittsford, Vt. 

Kitay, Julian Israel, a.b. (Princeton Univ.) 1949. Kearny, N. J. 

Kliman, Gilbert Wallace, a.b. (Univ. of Cincinnati) 1949. 

Cincinnati, Ohio 
jKraut, Herbert Leon (Columbia Univ.). Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lampros, George William, s.b. (Tufts Coll.) 1949. Pawtucket, R. I. 

Leiderman, Philip Herbert, Jr., s.m. (California Inst, of Technology) 1949, 
a.m. (Univ. of Chicago) 1949. Chicago, 111. 

Levinson, Gilbert Elliot, a.b. (Yale Univ.) 1948, a.m. (ibid.) 1949. 

Bayonne, N. J. 
Levy, Allan Henry, a.b. (Columbia Univ.) 1949. New York, N. Y. 

JLewis, Charles Edwin (Univ. of Kansas and Kansas City Jwiior Coll.). 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Loewenstein, Fred, s.b. (Yale Univ.) 1949. Binghamton, N. Y. 

Louria, Donald Bruce, a.b. 1949. Brooklyn, N. Y. 



I32 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

Low, Iolanda Einstein, a.b. (Stanford Univ.) 1947. Forest Hills, N. Y. 

Luck, David Jonathan Lewis, s.b. (Univ. of Chicago) 1949. 

Milwaukee, Wis. 
Malaret, German Emilio, s.b. 1949. Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 

Mannick, John Anthony, a.b. 1949. Sunny side, Wash. 

Martin, Christopher Michael, a.b. 1949. Jackson Heights, N. Y. 

Masters, Richard, a.b. 1949. Chelsea 

Mautner, Willy, a.b. (Birmingham-Southern Coll.) 1949. Birmingham, Ala. 
Medearis, Donald Norman, Jr., a.b. (Univ. of Kansas) 1949. 

Kansas City, Kans. 
Miller, David, s.b. (Coll. of the City of New York) 1949. New York, N. Y. 
Moss, Maurice, a.b. (Western Reserve Univ.) 1949. 

Cleveland Heights, Ohio 
Mudd, Stuart Harvey, s.b. 1949. Haverford, Pa. 

Nathanson, Neal, a.b. 1949. Cambridge 

Nesbet, John David, a.b. (Kenyon Coll.) 1949. Lakewood, Ohio 

Orski, Barbara Maria, a.b. (Hunter Coll.) 1949. Long Island City, N. Y. 
Pentlarge, Victor Howard, a.b. 1949. Belgrade Lakes, Maine 

Peters, James Ingram, Jr., a.b. (Princeton Univ.) 1949. Meridian, Miss. 

Powell, Virginia Elizabeth, a.b. (Goucher Coll.) 1949. Needham 

tPruett, Harry Jeroam, Jr. (Stanford Univ.). San Francisco, Calif. 

Purpura, Dominick Paul, a.b. (Columbia Univ.) 1949. 

Long Island City, N. Y. 
Robertson, George Duncan, a.b. (Princeton Univ.) 1949. 

Sierra Madre, Calif. 
tRomanul, Flaviu Cornel Alexandru (Univ. of Cincinnati). 

New York, N. Y. 
Rosenkrantz, Jens Georg, a.b. (Yale Univ.) 1949. Cincinnati, Ohio 

JRothbell, Earle Norris (Cornell Univ.). Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Rothberg, Harvey Daniel, Jr., a.b. (Princeton Univ.) 1949. 

Plainfield, N. J. 
Sacci, John Bonaventure, a.b. (West Virginia Univ.) 1949. 

Fairmont, W. Va. 
Sicular, Arthur, a.b. 1949 (1948). New York, N. Y. 

Sidman, Richard Leon, a.b. 1949 (1948). Mattapam 

JSimon, Harold Joachim (Univ. of California). San Francisco, Calif. 

Snodgrass, Philip James, a.b. 1949. Madison, Wis. 

Starr, Jason Leonard, a.b. 1949, a.m. 1949. Mattapan*, 

Temby, William Davenport, a.b. 1949. Welles! ey 

{Thompson, Thomas Nels, Jr. (Whitworth Coll.). LaCrosse, Wis. 

tTimmons, Robert Lansing (Yale Univ.). Tarry town, N. Yi 

Triedman, Leonard Jason, a.b. (Brown Univ.) 1949. Pawtucket, R. 1.1 



STUDENTS. 



FIRST CLASS 



!33 



Wallach, Donald Francis, s.b. (Yale Univ.) 1949. New York, N. Y. 

Weiner, Norman, s.b. (Univ. of Michigan) 1949. Rochester, N. Y. 

{Whitcomb, John Howard (Oberlin Coll.). Byron, Minn. 

Wolff, Jan, a.b. (Univ. of California) 1945, a.m. (ibid.) 1946, ph.d. (ibid.) 
1949. San Anselmo, Calif. 

Wysham, Donald Norris, a.b. (Princeton Univ.) 1949. Summit, N. J. 

Yahia, Clement, b.b.a. (Coll. of the City of New York) 1947. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Zangwill, Donald Penn, s.b. (Univ. of Pittsburgh) 1948. Pittsburgh, Pa. 



FIRST CLASS 

Adler, Scott, s.b. (Univ. of New Mexico) 1950. 

Allen, David West, a.b. 1950. 

Allen, Phillip Miller, a.b. (Oberlin Coll.) 1950. 

Alper, Milton Harold, a.b. 1950. 

Austen, Frank Karl, a.b. (Amherst Coll.) 1950. 

Ausubel, Herbert, a.b. (New York Univ.) 1950. 

Barbour, Robert Freeland, a.b. (Univ. of Cincinnati) 1946 

Baue, Arthur Edward, a.b. (W estminster Coll.) 1950. 

Bedingfeld, Donald Earl, a.b. (Boston Univ.) 1950. 

Borg, Kenneth Dana, a.b. 1950. 

Bornstein, Donald Lee, a.b. 1950. 

Bowen, John Farnam, a.b. (Williams Coll.) 1950. 

Braverman, Malvin, a.b. 1950. 

Breer, Robert Dunwoody, a.b. 1950. 

Briehl, Robin Walt, a.b. (Swarthmore Coll.) 1950. 

Briggs, Kenneth Ralph, s.b. (Univ. of Idaho) 1950. 

JBudil, Edward Joseph, Jr. (Yale Coll.). 

Burnstine, Richard Carl, a.b. 1950. 

Carey, Willaim Bacon, a.b. (Yale Univ.) 1950. 

Cattell, Richard Brenneman, a.b. (Williams Coll.) 1950. 

Cherrick, Gilbert R, a.b. (Washington Univ.) 1950. 

Claflin, Robert, a.b. 1950. 

Clason, Walton Page Clarke, a.b. (Princeton Univ.) 

Clay, Harris, a.b. 1950. 

Corf man, Philip Albert, a.b. (Oberlin Coll.) 1950. 
Couch, Nathan Pierce, a.b. (Yale Univ.) 1950. 
JCrowe, Charles Peter, Jr. (Dartmouth Coll.) . 
JdeNapoli, Robert Anthony (Dartmouth Coll.). 



Albuquerque, N. Mex. 

Chappaqua, N. Y. 

Ha?nilton, Ohio 

Lynn 

Akron, Ohio 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

St. Charles, Mo. 

Dorchester 

Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Providence, R. I. 

Oneida, N.Y. 

Boston 

Amsterdam, N . Y. 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

Murtaugh, Idaho 

Evanston, III. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Portsmouth, N . H. 

West Newton 

University City, Mo. 

Albany County, N. Y. 

1950. 

West Hartford, Conn. 

Augusta, Ga. 

Darien, Conn. 

Dalton 

Montclair, N. J. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



t Admitted on basis of three years' college work. 

§ Admitted on basis of four years' college work (in several cases work for the degree completed). 



*34 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 



DePriest, Oscar Stanton, 3d, a.b. 1950. 

§Draper, Franklin Montague, Jr. (Reed Coll.). 

Dugdale, /Marion, a.b. (Bryn Mawr Coll.) 1950. 

Evans, Franklin Temple, a.b. ( Vcmderbilt Univ.) 1950. 

Garceau, Arthur Joseph, a.b. {Duke Univ.) 1950. 

Garretson, Henry David, s.b. {Univ. of Arizona) 1950. 

Goldings, Herbert Jeremy, a.b. 1950. 

Grantz, Charlotte, a.b. (Barnard Coll.) 1950. 

Green, William Larimore, a.b. 1950. 

Greenberg, Ramon M, a.b. (Cornell Univ.) 1950. 

Greene, Robert Jay, a.b. (Univ. of Pennsylvania) 1950. 

Haley, Edward Chisholm, a.b. 1950. 

Hamilton, Lloyd Alexander, Jr., a.b. (Yale Univ.) 1950. 

Hermann, Hugh Piesen, a.b. 1950. 

Hitzrot, James iMorley, 2d, a.b. (Princeton Univ.) 1950. 

Holyoke, Edward Douglas, a.b. (Princeton Univ.) 1950. 

Manhasset, Long Island, N. Y. 



Urbana, Ohio 

Portland, Oregon 

Lima, Peru 

Shuqualak, Miss. 

Pembroke 

Tucson, Ariz. 

Brighton 

Yonkers,N.Y. 

Berkeley, Calif. 

Perth Amboy, N. J. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Belmont 

Lambertville, N. J. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mercersburg, Pa. 



Hutchinson, John Corrin, a.b. 1950. 

Judd, Alvan Bradford, a.b. (Cornell Univ.) 1950. 

Kahn, S David, a.b. 1950. 

Kaplan, iManuel Frank, s.b. (Univ. of Arizona) 1950. 

tKass, Nanette (Hunter Coll.). 

Klatsky, Arthur Louis, a.b. (Yale Univ.) 1950. 

Klingensmith, Walter Emery, a.b. 1950. 

Koch-Weser, Jan, a.b. (Univ. of Chicago) 1949. 



Hingham 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

New York, N. Y. 

Tucson, Ariz. 

Ozone Park, N. Y. 

Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

Athens, W. Va. 

Rolandia, Parana, Brazil 



Kornfeld, William, a.b. (Princeton Univ.) 1950. Flushing, Long Island, N.Y. 
Kramer, William, a.b. (Princeton Univ.) 1950. Brooklyn,N.Y. 

Kravitz, Arthur Richard, a.b. 1950. Brooklyn,N.Y. 

Landau, Bernard Robert, s.b. (Massachusetts Inst, of Technology) 1947, a.m. 



(Harvard Univ.) 1949, ph.d. (ibid.) 1950. 
Lassiter, William Edmund, a.b. 1950. 
JLeppmann, Dorothee (Oberlin Coll.). 
Letsou, Vasilios George, a.b. 1950. 
Levine, Milton Leon, a.b. (Columbia Univ.) 1950. 
Levinsky, Norman George, a.b. 1950. 
Loft, William Horace, Jr., a.b. 1950. 
MacDonald, Frank Alan, s.b. (Stanford Univ.) 1950. 
Marks, James Frederic, a.b, (Princeton Univ.) 1950. 
Martin, Donald Beckwith, a.b. (Haverford Coll.) 1950. 
Matthews, Herbert Mehlin, a.b. (Hiram Coll.) 1950. 
McPhedran, Alexander Maurice, a.b. 1950. 
Messner, Edward, a.b. 1949. 



Newark, N. J. 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Chicago, III. 

Lowell 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mattapan 

La Crescenta, Calif. 

Sacramento, Calif. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Ardmore, Pa. 

Hiram, Ohio 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



STUDENTS. 



FIRST CLASS 



35 



Meyer, Ernst Jochen, a.b. 1949, a.m. (ibid.) 1950. Konnarock, Va. 

Murray, Gertrude Ellen, s.b. (Simmons Coll.) 1950. Framingham 

Nobles, Eugene Rodman, Jr., a.b. (Princeton Univ.) 1950. Rosedale,Miss. 
Norman, John Clavon, Jr., a.b. 1950. Charleston, W. Va. 

Novack, Tevor David, s.b. (Tufts Coll.) 1950. Brookline 

O'Brien, Thomas Francis, a.b. (Coll. of the Holy Cross) 1950. South bridge 



Ostrow, Jay Donald, s.b. (Yale Univ.) 1950. 
Peters, John Adam, a.b. (Princeton Univ.) 1950. 
Politis, Vassiliki Cecilia, a.b. (Barnard Coll.) 1950. 
Pomeroy, Fletcher Janes, a.b. (Yale Univ.) 1950. 
Poskanzer, David Charles, a.b. 1950. 
Pothier, Lillian, s.b. (Jackson Coll.) 1948. 
Price, Stuart Eugene, Jr., a.b. (Amherst Coll.) 1950. 
Pugh, Daniel Edgar, 3d, a.b. (Williams Coll.) 1950. 
Rashin, Louis Nathan, a.b. (Swarthmore Coll.) 1949. 
Reynolds, Carmen, a.b. (Radcliffe Coll.) 1949. 
$Roh, Joseph (Charles Univ. and Manhattan Coll.). 



New York, N. Y. 

Elizabeth, N.J. 

Salonica, Greece 

New Britain, Conn. 

NewYork,N.Y. 

W. Harwich 

Columbus, Ohio 

Remsen, N. Y. 

Shanghai, China 

Cambridge 

Prague, Czechoslovakia 



Roth, Emanuel Mann, s.b. (Univ. of Massachusetts) 1950. Roxbury 

Rubin, Emanuel, s.b. (Villanova Coll.) 1950. Liberty, N.Y. 

JSaidi, Farrokh (Cornell Univ.). Teheran, Iran 

Schiebler, Gerold Ludwig, a.b. (Franklin and Marshall Coll.) 1950. 

Hamburg, Pa. 
Seipel, John Howard, s.b. (Carnegie Inst, of Technology) 1946, s.m. (ibid.) 

1947. 
Senghas, Richard Erwin, a.b. 1950. 
Shore, Miles Frederick, a.b. 1950. 
jSimon, Ernest Robert (Univ. of California) . 
Smith, Brainard Sutton, a.b. (Yale Univ.) 1950. 
Smythe, Mary Powell, a.b. (Vassar Coll.) 1947. 
Starobin, Oscar Ephram, a.b. 1950. 
Stein, Samuel Wolf, a.b. (Yale Univ.) 1950. 
Stevens, Thomas McConnell, a.b. (Haverford Coll.) 1950 
Stoler, Bruce Burton, a.b. (Johns Hopkins Univ.) 1950. 
Tucker, James Cecil, a.b. (Princeton Univ.) 1950. 
Tuller, Martin Abraham, a.b. 1950. 
Ulrichs, Charles Michael, a.b. (Princeton Univ.) 1950. 
Umansky, Richard, a.b. (Antioch Coll.) 1950. 
Upjohn, Harold Lawrence, a.b. (Yale Univ.) 1950. 
Upson, James Frederick, a.b. (Amherst Coll.) 1950. 
Vorenberg, John, a.b. 1950. 

Warbasse, James Richard, a.b. (Princeton Univ.) 1949. 
Watson, Peter Dekker, a.b. 1950. 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Lakewood, Ohio 

Chicago, III. 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Shaker Heights, Ohio 

Caldwell, N.J. 

Worcester 

Hartford, Conn. 

Bala-Cynwyd, Pa. 

Chicago, III. 

Birmingham, Ala. 

New York, N. Y. 

Norwich, N. Y. 

NewYork,N.Y. 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Buffalo, N. Y. 

Cambridge 

Maplewood, N. J. 

Haverford, Pa. 



I36 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

Webb, Nathaniel Conant, Jr., s.b. 1950. Montclair, N. J. 
Wiegand, Bernard David, s.b. (Cornell Univ.) 1949, a.m. (Harvard Univ.) 

1 950. College Point, N. Y. 

Wood, Francis Clark, Jr., a.b. (Princeton Univ.) 1950. Haverford,Pa. 

JWood, John Sumner, Jr. (Yale Coll.). Germantown, Md. 

Wright, Hastings Kemper, a.b. 1950. Winchester 



SUMMARY, 1950-1951 

Fourth Year 148 

Third Year 141 

Second Year 107 

First Year 113 

Total 509 



COLLEGES REPRESENTED 
COLLEGES REPRESENTED 



37 



Alabama, University of 

Allegheny College 

American University of Beirut 

Amherst College 

Antioch College 

Arizona, University of 

Barnard College 

Bates College 

Beloit College 

Birmingham-Southern College 

Boston College 

Boston University 

Bowdoin College 

Brigham Young University 

Brooklyn College 

Brown University 

Bryn Mawr College 

California Institute of Technology .... 

California, University of 

Carleton College 

Carnegie Institute of Technology .... 

Carroll College 

Charles University (Czechoslovakia) . . . 

Chicago, University of 

Cincinnati, University of 

Coe College 

Colgate University 

College of Idaho 

College of the City of New York 

College of the Holy Cross 

College of Puget Sound 

College of William and Mary 

College of Wooster 

Colorado, University of 

Columbia University 

Connecticut, Junior College cf 

Connecticut, University of 

Cornell College 

Cornell University 

Dartmouth College 

Davidson College 

Denison University 

Duke University 

Florida, University of 

Franklin and Marshall College 

Fu-Jen University (China) 

Gettysburg College 

Goucher College 

Grinnell College 

Gustavus Adolphus College 

Hamilton College 

Harvard University I 

Haverford College 

Hiram College 

Hunter College 

Idaho. University of 

Illinois, University of 

Indiana University 

Iowa State College 

Iowa, State University of 

John Carroll University 

Johns Hopkins University 

Kansas City Junior College 

Kansas State College 



Kansas, University of 2 

Kentucky, University of i 

Kenyon College I 

Macalaster College i 

Maine, University of 3 

Manhattan College 1 

Maryland, University of 1 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology ... 9 

Massachusetts, University of 2 

McGill University (Canada) 2 

Miami, University of 1 

Michigan State College 1 

Michigan, University of 4 

Minnesota, University of 3 

Mississippi, University of 5 

Missouri, University of I 

Montana State University 4 

Mount Holyoke College 1 

Munich, University of (Germany) .... 2 

Nebraska, University of 3 

New Hampshire, University of 2 

New Mexico, University of 1 

New York University 3 

Niagara University 1 

North Carolina, University of 15 

Northwestern University 1 

Oberlin College 7 

Ohio State University 5 

Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical Col- 
lege 

Pasadena Junior College 

Patna University (India) 

Pennsylvania State College 

Pennsylvania, University of 

Pittsburgh, University of 

Pomona College 

Princeton University 

Puerto Rico, University of 

Queens College 

Radcliffe College 

Reed College 

St. Bonaventure College 

St. John's University (China) 

St. Louis University 

St. Stephan College (Germany) 

Simmons College 

Southern California, University of .... 

Stanford University 

Swarthmore College 

Syracuse, University of 

Tennessee, University of 

Texas Christian University 

Texas College 

Texas College of Mines and Metallurgy . . 

Trinity College (D.C.) 

Tufts College 

Tulsa, University of 

Union College 

United States Naval Academy 

Utah, University of 

Vanderbilt University 

Vassar College 

Vermont, University of 

Villanova College 



29 



i 3 8 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 



Virginia Polytechnic Institute . 
Virginia, University of ... 
Washington and Jefferson College 
Washington University . . . 
Washington, University of . . 

Wellesley College 

Wesleyan University .... 
Western Reserve University 
Westminster College (Missouri) 
West Virginia University . . 
Wheaton College (Illinois) 

Whitman College 

Whitworth College .... 
Williams College 



Wisconsin, University of 3 

Wofford College 1 

Wyoming, University of 1, 

Yale University 31 

Yenching University (China) 1 

Total 558 

Counted more than once 49 

Total number of students 509 

Entered advanced standing 63 

Number of colleges represented 146 

Number of college graduates 413 

Number of non-graduates 96 



MEDICAL AND DENTAL MEDICAL SCHOOLS REPRESENTED BY MEN 
WHO ENTERED SCHOOL WITH ADVANCED STANDING 



Alabama, Medical College of 

Budapest, Medical College of 

Columbia University 

Dartmouth College 

Harvard School of Dental Medicine .... 

Illinois, University of 

Indiana, University of 

Johns Hopkins University 

Lodz, University of (Poland) 

Louisiana State University 

Mississippi, University of 

Missouri, University of 

Moscow, University of (Russia) 

Munich University 

North Carolina, University of 15 

Northwestern University 1 



Ohio State University 
Tennessee, University of 
Vanderbilt University 
Virginia, University of 
Washington University 
Wayne University . . 
Yale University . . 



Total 

Counted more than once 



63 



Total 

Total number of men admitted to first 
year standing 446 

Total 509 






SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE 

On June 22, 1950, Nine Degrees were Conferred as Follows: 

D.M.D. 

Charles Leslie Boyers, Jr., a.b. (Marietta Coll.) 1941. 
Richard Lundy Butler, a.b. (Coe Coll.) 1947. 
George Christman, s.b. 1944, s.b. (New York Univ.) 1946. 
Merrill Irving Feldman. 
Philip Augustus Reilly, Jr. 

James Austin Sowles, a.b. (Bowdoin Coll.) 1950. 

Wesley Wallace Washburn, Jr., a.b. (Amherst Coll.) 1944, m.d. (Long Island 
Coll. of Medicine) 1948. 

D.M.D. cum Laude for Thesis in a Special Field 

Owen William Kite, a.b. 1942. 

Mortimer Lorber, s.b. (New York Univ.) 1945. 

FOURTH CLASS 

*Atwood, Douglas Allen, a.b. (Amherst Coll.) 1945, m.d. (Harvard Univ.) 
1946. West Roxbury 

fBland, George Ballard (Univ. of Arizona). Tucson, Ariz. 

tChastanet, Alan Arthur (Howard Univ.). St. Lucia, B.W.I. 

Curtin, Victor Thomas, a.b. 1947 (1946). Methuen 

tFarrell, David Joseph (Tufts Coll. and Harvard Coll.). Watertown 

Farrell, John Frederick, a.b. (Indiana Univ.) 1947. Washington, D. C. 

Helfand, Zolman, s.b. (Tufts Coll.) 1947. Milford 

tjones, Thomas London, Jr. (Univ. of Vermont and Washington Univ.). 

Detroit, Mich. 
Lucas, Jason Edward, a.b. 1947. Boston 

Schwartz, Abraham, a.b. (Brown Univ.) 1941. Providence, R. I. 

*Siegel, Elliott Joseph [m.d. Univ. of Toronto 1944]. 

Ha?nilton, Ont., Canada 
fTheus, Walter Wyman (Univ. of South Carolina). Estill, S. C. 

West, Alvin Irvin, a.b. (New York Univ.) 1946. New 'York, N.Y. 

THIRD CLASS 

Berman, Herbert, b.s.e. (Univ. of Michigan) 1943. Union, N. J. 

Boyett, James Edward, a.b. (Univ. of Tennessee) 1948. Way cross, Ga. 

t Admitted on basis of two years' college work. 
+ Admitted on basis of three years' college work. 
* Transferred to third year class. 



I40 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

Hinson, Harry Lee, s.b. (Wake Forest Coll.) 1942. Charlotte, N. C. 

JJacobs, Bernard (Syracuse Univ.). Syracuse, N. Y. 

Lasher, Clarence Kenneth, s.b. (Union Coll.) 1942. East Greenbush, N. Y. 
{Lincoln, Robert Carling (Columbia Coll.). South River, N. J. 

*Lustig, Leopold Paul (Univ. of Erlangen, Germany). Drobobycz, Poland 
Pincus, Ernest Stanford, s.b. (Union Coll.) 1948. Long Beach, N. Y. 

Rothblatt, Julian Maurice, a.b. 1948. Brookline 

Ryan, James Patrick, s.b. (Hob art Coll.) 1948. Mechanicville, N. Y. 

Samaha, Emile Charles Abdelnour, s.b. (Univ. of New Hampshire) 1946. 

Portsmouth, N. H. 
Ship, Arthur George, a.b. (New York Univ.) 1947. New York, N. Y. 

SECOND class 

Adams, Ernest Eugene, s.b. (Univ. of Maine) 1938. Brewer, Maine 

t Albert, Joseph (Boston Univ.). Dorchester 

Cianciolo, Joseph Frank, s.b. (Univ. of Notre Dame) 1948. Medford 

Greenberg, Harold Lester, s.b. (Univ. of Massachusetts) 1948. Brookline 
{Harris, Alvin Herbert (Harvard Univ.). Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Kaye, Bernard Louis, a.b. (Yale Univ.) 1949. New Haven, Conn. 

Liebman, Jerome, a.b. (Univ. of Pennsylvania) 1949. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Robison, Ray Benton, a.b. 1949. Bemus Point, N. Y. 

Seiler, Arthur Louis, s.b. (Univ. of Wisconsin) 1948, s.m. (ibid.) 1949. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Sperber, Robert Jack, s.b. (Univ. of Wisconsin) 1948, s.m. (ibid.) 1949. 

New York, N. Y. 
Stein, Robert John, s.b. (Univ. of Florida) 1949. St. Petersburg, Fla. 

tStemmer, August Ludwig (Miami Univ.). Hamilton, Ohio 

Taira, Tom Keizo, a.b. (Univ. of Wisconsin) 1948, a.m. (ibid.) 1949. 

Honolulu, Hawaii 
J Walker, Jerome Kenneth (Univ. of Wisconsin and Marquette Univ.). 

Milwaukee, Wis. 

first class 

JBaker, Lawrence (Boston Univ.). Dorchester r 

Binder, Arnold Eugene, s.b. (Univ. of Massachusetts) 1949. Mattapam 

Clubb, Robert Wayne, a.b. (Linfield Coll.) 1948. Carson, Wash. 

JDolce, Joseph Domenick (Temple Univ. and Univ. of Alabama). 

Burlington, N. J. . 
Fishman, Norton, a.b. (Boston Univ.) 1948, s.m. (Northeastern Univ.) 1950.' 

Dorchester f 
Garren, Leonard, s.b. (Coll of the City of New York) 1948, s.m. (Univ. of\ 
Wisconsin) 1950. New York, N. Y. 



STUDENTS. SUMMARY 



I 4 I 



Goldstein, Stanley, s.b. (The Citadel) 1950. New York, N.Y. 

Gordon, Philip Scott, a.b. (Yale Univ.) 1948. West Haven, Conn. 

King, Leonard Edward, a.b. (New York Univ.) 1949. Albany, N.Y. 

Marcello, David Edward, Jr., a.b. (Brown Univ.) 1950. Wethers field, Conn. 
Tanz, Ralph David, a.b. (Univ. of Rochester) 1948. New Rochelle,N.Y. 
tToverud, Svein Utheim (Univ. of Oslo and State Univ. of Iowa). 

Oslo, Norway 
Trieger, Norman, a.b. (Emory Univ.) 1950. NewYork,N.Y. 

Vine, Bernard George, a.b. (Yale Univ.) 1950. Trenton,N.J. 

SUMMARY 

Fourth Class 13 

Third Class 12 

Second Class 14 

First Class 14 

Total 53 



COLLEGES REPRESENTED 



Alabama, University of 

Amherst College 

Arizona, University of 

Boston University 

Brown University 

Citadel, The 

College of the City of New York . 

Columbia University 

Emory University 

Erlangen, University of (Germany) . 

Florida, University of 

Harvard University 

Hobart College 

Howard University 

Indiana University 

Iowa, State University of .... 

Linfield College 

Maine, University of 

Marquette University 

Massachusetts, University of ... 
Miami University (Ohio) .... 

Michigan, University of 

New Hampshire, University of . . 

New York. University 

Northeastern University 

Notre Dame, University of ... . 
Oslo, University of (Norway) . . 

Pennsylvania, University of ... 

Rochester, University of 

South Carolina, University of . . . 

Syracuse University 

Temple University 

Tennessee, University of 

■ Toronto, University of (Canada) . 



Tufts College 2 

Union College 2 

Vermont, University of 1 

Wake Forest College 1 

Washington University ........ 1 

Wisconsin, University of 5 

Yale University 3 

Total 60 

Counted more than once 7 

Total number of students 53 

MEDICAL SCHOOLS REPRESENTED 

Harvard University 1 

Toronto, University of (Canada) .... 1 

Total 2 

DENTAL SCHOOLS REPRESENTED 

Oslo, University of (Norway) 1 

Erlangen, University of (Germany) .... 1 

Total 2 

Entered advanced standing 4 

Number of colleges represented 41 

Number of medical schools represented . . 2 

Number of dental schools represented ... 2 

Number of college graduates 36 

Number of non-graduates 17 



142 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

TEACHING STAFF 



1950-51 

»AGE 

Abbott, J. A 72 Ball, E. G. 

Abelmann, W. H 66 Ballantine, H. T 

Abrams, A. L 90 Banks, B. M. . 

Abramson, D 85 Barger, A. C. 

Adams, F. D 61 Barker, R. H. . 

Adams, J., Jr 70 Barkin, R. E. . 

Adams, R. A 74 Barrnett, R. J. . 

Adams, R. DeL 71 Barr, J. S. ... 

Adelson, L 60 Barrows, L. J. 

Alameri, E. H 51 Barry, H., Jr. . . 

Albert, H. S 73 Bartlett, M. K. 

Albright, F 61 Bartter, F. C. . 

Albright, J. T 101 Batchelor, W. H 

Alexander, B 61 Bauer, W 

Allen, F. H., Jr 81 Bayles, T. B. . 

Allen, H. F 78 Beaser, S. B. ... 

Allers, O. E 81 Beecher, H. K. 

Altschule, M. D 61 Beem, M. O. .. 

Amdur, B. H 53 Beetham, W. P. 

Andosca, J. B. G 63 Benda, C. E. 

Andreson, L. H 79 Benedict, E. B. 

Apt, L 83 Benedict, P. S. . 

Ashbel, R $6, 91 Bennett, E. V. 

Atwell, C. R 72 Benson, J. A., Jr. 

Aub, J. C 60 Berenberg, W. 

Aufranc, O. E 96 Berezin, M. A. 

Augustine, D. L 58 Berg, R. L 

Austen, G., Jr 89 Bering, E. A., Jr 

Avery, H. F 82 Berman, L. . 

Aycock, W. L 87 Berry, G. P. 

Bacon, W. B 95 Bevilacqua, R. P 

Badger, T. L 61 Bibring, G. L. . 

Bailey, C. C 62 Bigelow, F. S. . 

Bailey, O. T 56, 60 Bigelow, R. B. 

Bakay, L 92 Birchard, W. H 

Baker, W. H 65 Bird, K. T 

Baker, D. V 96 Black, C. F 

Balboni, V. G 63 Blais, J. A 



TEACHING STAFF 



43 



PAGE 

Bland, E. F 61 

I Blank, I. H 70 

I Bleisch, V. R 57 

. Blodgett, F. M 82 

Blom, G. E 73 

Bloomberg, W 72 

Bloomfield, R. A 62 

Blout, E. R 56 

Blumgart, H. L 10, 60 

[■ Blystad, W 82 

( Bocking, D 65 

I Bockoven, J. S 73 

I Boeder, P 77 

I Boggs, J. D 56 

J Bojar, S 74 

j Bonner, F. J 73 

I Borrero, L. M 50 

Botsf ord, T. W 89 

[ Boyers, C. L 102 

i Braconier, H. E 78 

L Brazelton, T. B 81 

I Brazier, M. A. B 72 

Brewster, A. H 96 

Briggs, B. D 89 

I Brines, J. K 81 

( Broderick, T. F., Jr 96 

i Brady, O. W 51 

I Brown, D. E $6 

J Brown, H. P 90 

j Brown, M. G 62 

I Brown, M. R 72 

I Brown, R. K 51 

( Brown, T 96 

I Brownell, G. L 62 

I Brownlee, R. E 63 

1 Buchanan, J. L 91 

[ Bucher, N. L. R 63 

t Buckley, E. S., Jr 65 

{ Buka, R., Jr 64 

I Burbank, C. B 90 

I Burdon, A. P 74 

I Burgin, L. B 81 



Burke, R. C 70 

Burrage, W. S 63 

Burwell, C. S 61 

Butler, A. M 80 

Buxton, B. H., Jr. 85 

Byers, R. K 80 

Callahan, E. J., 3d 6$ 

Calkins, E 52 

Campbell, H. B 85 

Campagna-Pinto, D. F 52 

Caner, G. C 72 

Cannon, B 89 

Cardozo, R. H 48 

Carpenter, R. LeG 77 

Carr, E. A., Jr 59 

Carroll, W. J. E 97 

Casten, V. G 78 

Castle, W. B. , 61 

Castleman, B 56 

Caton, W. L 85 

Cavanaugh, T. J 78 

Cave, E. F 96 

Cerrato, C. M 97 

Chalmers, T. C, Jr 63 

Chamberlin, D. T 64 

Chamberlain, J. W 90 

Chandler, P. A 77 

Chapman, E. McA 61 

Chapman, S. S 54 

Chapman, W. P 63 

Chatfield, P. 48 

Chisholm, J. F., Jr 78 

Christainsen, P. L 74 

Christensen, W. R 79 

Christman, G 102 

Churchill, E. D 88 

Chute, R 89 

Cigarroa, J. G 64 

Claff, C. L 89 

Clark, L. D 74 

Clark, W. S 63 

Clauser, W. J 73. 



■44 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 



Clifford, S. H 80 

Clothier, F 72 

Clough, J. M 78 

Clower, V. L 74 

Cobb, S 71 

Coffin, D. L 56 

Cogan, D. G 77, 79 

Cohen, J 96 

Cohen, J. D 64 

Cohen, M. E 63, 72 

Cohen, M. 1 103 

Cohen, S 63 

Cohn, E. J 51 

Cohn, M 52 

Colby, F. H 88 

Cole, E. M 72 

Collins, F. L., Jr 92 

Conan, M. E 95 

Conant, J. B 7, 10, 93 

Contratto, A. W 63 

Cook, CD 81 

Coolidge, J. C 74 

Coon, G. P 72 

Coons, A. H 54 

Cope, 88 

Copeland, B. E 56 

Corsa, L., Jr 82 

Coxon, R. V 6$ 

Craddock, C. G 74 

Craig, J. M 56 

Craige, E 64 

Crane, C 90 

Cranley, J. J., Jr 9 1 

Crawford, G. M 70 

Crawford, J. D 82 

Criscitiello, M. G 6$ 

Crocker, S. C 64 

Crothers, B 80 

Cugell, D. W 65 

Culver, P. J 61 

Currens, J. H 64 

Curtis, G. W 57 



Daeschner, C. W., Jr 83 

Daffinee, R. W 81 

Daland, E. M 90 

Dalrymple, W 65 

Dandliker, W. R 51 

Daum, S. W 66 

d'Autremont, C. C 74 

Davenport, L. F 61 

Davidson, C. S 61 

Davidson, D. T., Jr 81 

Davies, J. A. V 80 

Dawber, T. R 64 

Dawes, D. C 73 

Dealy, J. B., Jr 6 5 

Deane, H. W 47 

DeBusk, F. L 83 

Decker, B. LeR 64 

Decker, J. P 57 

DeFriez, A. I. C 64 

DelCampo, D 82 

d'Elseaux, F. C 72 

Denny-Brown, D. E 71 

Derick, C. L 61 

Derow, H. A 61 

Derrick, W. S 90 

Desforges, J. F 65 

DeShon, H. J 72 

DeWilde, H 101 

Dexter, L 61 

Diamond, I $6 

Diamond, L. K 80 

Dickson, J. F., 3d 65 

Dickson, W. A 81 

Dienes, L. L 54 

Dillard, P. H 91 

Dobyns, B. Mel 88 

Dodge, P. R 74 

Donaghy, G. E 90 

Donaldson, D. D 79 

Donaldson, G. A 90 

Dooley, S. W 83 

Dow, J. W 81 



TEACHING STAFF 



H5 



Drooker, J. C 97 

Duncan, C. J 94 

Dunning, J. M 10, 43, 104, 105 

Dunphy, E. B 77 

Dunphy, J. E 88 

Durling, E. J 101 

Du Toit, C. H 65 

Dwyer, H. S 104 

Dwyer, T. F 72 

Dyer, E. C 81 

Eades, M. F 85 

Eastcott, H. H. G 91 

Easton, AI. T 78 

Eaton, M. D 54 

Edelman, I. S 91 

Edsall, J. T 51 

Edwards, E. A 47 

Edwards, J. LeR 57 

EglorT, F. R. L 74 

Ehrlich, H. L 101 

Eichhorn, M 74 

Eldredge, LeR. L., Jr 83 

Eley, R. C 80 

Elkin, M 79 

Ellis, D. S 64 

Ellis, L. B 61 

Elliston, W. A 96 

Emerson, K., Jr 61 

Enders, J. F 54 

Engel, L. L 52, 62 

England, A. C, Jr 73 

Eppinger, E. C 10, 44, 61 

Epstein, S. H 72 

Erikson, G. E 48 

Evans, M. G 97 

Eyler, W. R 79 

Faber, H 91 

Fang, H. C. H 74 

Farber, S 55, 103 

Farrand, R. E 92 

Favour, C. B 62 

Fawcett, D. W 48 



PAGE 

Faxon, H. H 89 

Felder, D. A 92 

Ferguson, A. B., Jr 96 

Ferguson, C. F 97 

Ferris, B. G., Jr 83 

Fine, J 88 

Finkenstaedt, J. T 6$ 

Finland, M 10, 61 

Fishman, A. P 50 

Fiske, C. H 52 

Fitz, R 10, 18, 62 

FitzGerald, J. A 95 

FitzHugh, G. S 63 

Flake, C. G 97 

Fleischner, F. G 79 

Fleming, R. E 72 

Flynn, J. M 64 

Fogg, L. C 56 

Folch-Pi, J 52 

Foley, J. M 72 

Forbes, A. P 64 

Forbes, G 60 

Ford, R 60, 105 

Forsham, P. H 63 

Forster, R. E., 2d 50 

Fowler, F. DuM 91 

Fox, H. M 71 

Frank, A. A 81 

Frank, E. D 90 

Frank, H. A 88 

Frank, N. R 6$ 

Franseen, E. F 96 

Frantz, I. DeR., Jr 63 

Frawley, T 65 

Frazier, C. N 10, 70 

Fredrickson, D. S 6$ 

Freedberg, A. S 61 

Fremont-Smith, P 64 

French, A. B 6$ 

Frieden, E. H 52 

Friedman, O. M 89 

Friend, D. G 59 



4 6 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 



Funkenstein, D. H 73 

Gabuzda, G. J., Jr 65 

Gaensler, E. A 6$ 

Gajdusek, D. C 82 

Gallup, H. E 81 

Gardner, F. H 63 

Gardner, G. E 72, 83 

Gardner, M. R 74 

Garfield, S 83 

Gargill, S. L 61 

Garland, J 81 

Garrity, R. W 92 

Gates, O $6 

Gauld, A. G 85, 94 

Gautier, E. C 82 

Geiman, Q. M 58 

Gellis, S. S 80 

Gephart, F. T 90 

Geren, B. B $6 

Gibson, J. G., 2d 62 

Gifford, S. R., Jr 74 

Gillespie, L 85, 95 

Gilman, S 90 

Gitlin. D 82 

Gocke, T. M 64 

Goddard, J. W 56 

Godley, A. F 82 

Goethals, T. R 85 

Golden, J. B 91 

Goldman, F 104 

Goldman, M 73 

Goldstein, A 59 

Goldstein, R 64 

Goodale, R. L 97 

Goodale, W. T 64 

Gorbach, A. C, Jr 5 6 

Gordon, J. E 104 

Gorin, N 81 

Gorlin, R 6$ 

Graham, J. R 64 

Grant, L 10 

Grant, W. M 79 



PAGE 

Graves, J. P 83 

Gray, C. T 54 

Gray, S. J 61 

Green, W. T 96 

Greenblatt, G. R 72 

Greenblatt, M 72 

Greenough, C. W 10 

Greep, R. 48, 101, 104 

Gribetz, D 82 

Grice, D. S 96 

Griesemer, R. D 70 

GrifTeath, H. 1 83 

Gross, J 62 

Gross, R. E 11,88,103 

Grossman, H. P 78 

Gundersen, T 77 

Gunther, B 50 

Gurd, F. R. N 51 

Gustafson, P 86 

Haight, T. H 6$ 

Haley, H. B 91 

Hall, T. C 48, 65 

Hall, V. R., Jr 73 

Hamlin, E., Jr 89 

Hamolsky, M. W 66 

Hanelin, J 80 

Hanks, J. H 54 

Hardy, I. B., Jr 90 

Harken, D. E 89 

Harris, A. R 67 

Harris, E. J 91 

Harris, J. W 6$ 

Harrison, J. H 88 

Harrold, B. D 60 

Hastings, A. B 11, 52 

Hausman, D. H 57 

Haynes, F. W 62 

Hayward, O. S 87 

Heath, C. W 62 

Heath, P 77 

Hegsted, D. M 53 

Hendler, A. F 67 



TEACHING STAFF 



'47 



Hendrick, I 

Hermanson, L 

Hershenson, B. B 

Hertig, A. T 55, 

Heusner, A. P 

Hicks, S. P 

Higano, N 

Hill, A. G. S 

Hill, A. M 

Hill, L. W 

Hill, W. R, Jr 

Hindman, D. H 

Hinman, C. H 

Hinton, E. E 

Hirsch, E. O 

Hoagland, M. B 

Hoeffel, G. N 

Hoeprich, P. D 

Hoffman, M. C 

Hogan, J. F., Jr., 

Holder, R 

Holmes, E. M 

Holt, W. L 

Horenstein, S 

Home, H. W., Jr 

Hornor, A. A 

Horwitz, M 

Horwitz, W. H 

Howard, P. M 

Hsi-Chih, D. C 

Hsu, D. Y. M 

Hubbell, J. P., Jr 

Hufnagel, C. A 

Hugenberger, P. W 

Hughes, W. L, Jr 

Hume, D. M 

Hunter, F. T 

Hunter, M. J 

Hurwitz, D 

Ingbar, S. H 

Ingersoll, F. McC 

Ingraham, F. D 



7i 
90 
89 
86,94 
72 
56 
67 
53 
81 
80 
70 
85 
85 
67 
65 
64 
81 
54 
9 1 
83 
74 
97 
72 
74 
95 
58 
65 
82 

72 
82 

58 
81 
90 
96 

5i 

92 
62 

5i 
62 

65 
94 



Isliker, H. C 51 

Iyer, S 74 

Jackson, G. G 65 

Jackson, H., Jr 61 

Jackson, J. H 64 

Jacobson, B. M 63 

James, A. H 65 

Jamieson, R. A 91 

Jandl, J. H 67 

Janeway, C. A 80, 103 

Jaques, W. E 57 

Javid, M 91 

Jazowski, J. P 101 

Jenkins, D 65 

Jessiman, A. G 91 

Jessner, L. N 72 

Johnson, C. C 78 

Johnstone, R. E 86 

Joly, D. J 91 

Jones, CM 61 

Jones, T. D 62 

Jones, W. N 96 

Jones, W. S 85 

Joplin, R. J 96 

Juda, W 89 

Kahn, E 74 

Kanter, S. S 73 

Kaplan, S 73 

Karnovsky, M. L 52 

Karp, M. G 96 

Kass, E. H 65 

Kaye, A 73 

Keitel, H. G 82 

Kelemen, G 97 

Keller, E. B 66 

Kelley, R. M 66 

Kelley, S. B 90 

Kelley, V. J 97 

Kellogg, R. H 50 

Kelsey, W. M 82 

Kendall, L. G 90 

Kennell, J. H 83 



148 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 



Kerr, W. S., Jr 90 

Kerrigan, G. A 83 

Keyes, P. H 101 

Kiehl, A. K 81 

Kimball, S 63 

King, M. J 78 

Kingsland, L. C, Jr 81 

Kinoshita, J. H 53 

Kinsey, V. E 79 

Kite, O. W 102 

Kirkwood, S. B 86, 95 

Klein, A 96 

Knobloch, J. D 83 

Kohn, A 54 

Kominz, D. R 51 

Kontoff, H. A 90 

Kopf, G. F 101 

Koshland, M. E 54 

Kowalski, H. J 87 

Kozol, H. L 72 

Kranes, A 64 

Krayer, 1 1, 59 

Kubik, C. S 71 

Kuhns, J. G 96 

Kulka, J. P 5 6 

Kunz, L. J. J 54 

Kurland, G. S 64 

Landau, D 74 

Landing, B. H 56 

Landis, E. M 10, 50 

Landwehr, G 66 

Lang, E. F., Jr 74 

Lang, H. T., Jr 84 

Lanman, T. H 88 

Lansing, C 83 

Leach, C. A., Jr 83 

Leadbetter, W. F 90 

Leaf, A 66 

Leahey, B. D 78 

LeCompte, P. M $6 

Leduc, E. H 48 

Leeper, R. W 70 



Leighton, H. T. . . . 85 

Lennox, W. G 71, 83 

Lentine, J 97 

Lerman, J 62 

Lesses, M. F 63 

Levenson, W. S 90 

Lever, W. F 70 

Levin, S 73 

Levine, H. D 62 

Levine, J 73 

Levine, S. A 61 

Levinson, J. E 66 

Lewis, B. M 66 

Lewis, D. K 97 

Ley, A. B 66 

Liebman, S. D 78 

Lindemann, E 71 

Linenthal, A. J 59, 63 

Linn, T. L 56 

Linton, R. R 89 

Lipmann, F. A 52, 54 

Locke, W 82 

Lockhart, A. J 63 

Loewy, A. G 51 

Loftfield, R. B 62 

Logan, W. B., Jr 91 

Long, J. B 67 

Longino, L. A 90 

Lorenz, M 74 

Losch, P. K 103 

Lovesey, B. E 97 

Low, B. W 51 

Lown, B 66 

Lowis, S 91 

Lund, C. C 89 

Luongo, M. A 60 

Lurie, M. H 97 

Lyman, C. P 48 

Lynch, G. W 63 

MacCollum, D. W 89 

MacCready, R. A 54 

MacDonald, A. S., Jr 82 






TEACHING STAFF 



I 49 



Macdonald, M. E 72 

MacDonald, W. J 85 

MacGregor, C. A 90 

MacLachlan, E. A 82 

Macmillan, A. S 79, 98 

MacMillan, J. C 56 

MacPherson, D. J 63 

Madison, W. McK., Jr 67 

Magasanik, B 54 

Mallory, G. K 56 

Maliory, T. B 56 

Maloney, A. M 101 

Maloof, F 64 

Mandoki, J. J 59 

Mann, J 73 

Mansfield, J. S 63 

Maple, T. G 54 

Marble, A 62 

Marjerison, H. M 104 

Marks, J. H 79 

Marlow, F. W., Jr 62 

Maroney, M. W 82 

Martin, J. A 80 

Martin, R. E 85 

Martin, S. F 78 

Massell, B. F 67, 81 

Matoltsy, A. G 70 

Matson, D. D 89 

McArthur, J. W 81 

McCarter, R. H 73 

McCort, J. J 80 

McCracken, B. H 67 

McDaniel, L. T 10, 63 

McDermott, W. V., Jr 92 

McDonald, F. C 81 

McGinn, S 63 

McKay, D. G 56,86 

McKee, R. W 52 

McKittrick, J. B 90 

McKittrick, L. S 88 

McLaurin, R. L 92 

McLean, D. E 82 



Meadow, H. C 10, 43 

Meadows, E. C 91 

Means, J. H 1 1, 43, 61 

Meath, J. A., Jr 73 

Meeker, I. A., Jr 91 

Meigs, J. V 94 

iMeilman, E 63 

Meissner, W. A 56 

Meltzer, A 91 

Meltzer, P. E 97 

Menzer, D ; 73 

Merriam, F. C 79 

Merrill, D 62 

Merrill, J. A 57 

Merrill, J. P 63 

Merrington, W. R 91 

Messenger, H. K 78 

Metcalfe, J 66 

Metcoff, J 81 

Meyer, E 81 

Meyer, J. S 74 

Mezer, R. R 74 

Michaels, J. J 72 

Michel, A. J. D 91 

Michelson, J. J 73 

Mickley, J. H 60 

Miles, H. H. W 73 

Miller, C. C 91 

Miller, D 97 

Miller, J. M 82 

Miner, R. L 102 

Mixter, C. G., Jr 91 

Monks, J. P 63 

Monroe, R. T 62 

Moore, D. M 81 

Moore, F. D 11,88 

Moore, M 72 

Morato-Manaro, J. F 82 

iMorawetz, H 51 

Morris, R. H 96 

Morse, L. S 82 

Moser, H. W 66 



i 5 o 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 



Mosher, H. A 78 

Moulton, R. T 82 

Mueller, H. L 82 

Mueller, J. H 53 

Mueller, W 97 

Muellner, S. R 90 

Muller, A. F 66 

Mulligan, W. J 85, 95 

Munro, D 89 

Munson, P. M 101 

Murphy, F. P., Jr 74 

Murphy, J. F 85 

Murphy, W. F 73 

Murphy, W. P 62 

Murphy, W. P., Jr 66 

Mushatt, C 73 

Myers, G. S 64 

Myerson, P. G 73 

Nachlas, M. M 92 

Nadas, A. S 81 

Nakasone, N 82 

Nardi, G. L 48, 92 

Nason, L. H 90 

Naterman, H. L 64 

Nathanson, I. T 89 

Nelson, H. B 85 

Nelson, K. D 67 

Nemiah, J. C 64 

Neuhauser, E. B. D 97, 103 

Newell, J. L 85 

Newton, F. C 88 

Newton, H. F 89 

Nichols, G., Jr 82 

Nichols, N. P 82 

Nilges, R. G 92 

Nicoll, P. A 50 

Niswander, G. D 74 

Norman, L. R 66 

Norton, P. L 96 

Odland, G. F 48 

O'Hare, J. P 61 

Oken, D 67 



Ohmart, L. M 104 

Olley, J. F. 56 

Olney, J. M., Jr 91 

Oncley, J. L 51 

Onesti, S. J 82 

Osborne, J 82 

Osgood, C. K 54, 64 

O'Shea, J. A 83 

Ottenstein, D 74 

Otto, J. F., Jr 64 

Ourisson, P 59 

Paine, R. S 83 

Paine, T. F., Jr 64 

Pappenheimer, J. R 50 

Papper, S 66 

Parker, F., Jr $6 

Patterson, P. R 81 

Pechet, M. M 56 

Perlo, V. P 73 

Peters, CM 63 

Pfeffer, W., Jr 82 

Phillips, G. B 66 

Phillips, J. H 95 

Pier, A. S., Jr 64 

Pike, G. M 64 . 

Pinto, H. B 66 

Pittman, H. S 63 

Point, W. W., 3d 66) 

Pollen, A 78 

Pope, A 73 

Potter, A. L 85 

Prather, G. C 89 

Pratt, D. B 54} 

Prout, C 63 

Prugh, D. G 81 

Purdy, C. B 66, 

Putnam, H. M 82 

Putnam, M. C 72 

Quadfasel, F. A 73 

Quarton, G. C 74 

Quigley, T. B 89 

Quinby, W. C, Jr 90 



TEACHING STAFF 



l 5 l 



Radford, E. P., Jr 50 

Raeder, O. J 73 

Raker, J. W 90 

Rambo, O. N., Jr 56 

Ranee, C. P 82 

Rawen, R. Ai 73 

Read, C. H., Jr 82 

Record, E. E 96 

Reid, D. E 11,85 

Reid, J. R 72 

Reidy, J. A 96 

Reifenstein, R. W 64 

Reiner, L 56 

Renold, A. E 66 

Rexlord, E. N 73 

Reyersbach, G. C 81 

Reynolds, J 67 

Reynolds, W. E 87 

Rich, L 66 

Richards, L. G 97 

Richards, V 50 

Richardson, E. P., Jr 73 

Richardson, J. R 97 

Riemenschneider, P. A 80 

Riggs, B. C 73 

Riggs, D. S 59 

Riseman, J. E. F 62 

Ritvo, M 79 

Ritzman, T. A 95 

Rivers, W. P 83 

Robbins, F. C 81 

Robbins, L. L 79 

Robbins, S. L 56 

Robins, S. A 79 

Robinson, C. V 50 

Robinson, G. C 82 

Roby, C. C 85 

Rochlin, G 74 

Rock, J 86, 94 

Rodkey, F. L 52 

Roe, B. B 92 

Rogers, H 90 



PAGE 

Rogers, W. A 96 

Romberg, E. C 81 

Romney, S. L 86, 95 

Roopenian, A 97 

Root, H. F 62 

Ropes, M. W 61 

Rose, A. S 73 

Rosen, I. M 74 

Rosenblum, H 83 

Rosenfeld, L 91 

Rosenfield, H. H 85 

Ross, F. P 90 

Ross, R. A 81 

Roucayrol, J. C 52 

Rouillard, F 85 

Rowe, C. R 96 

Rudin, D. 91 

Runyan, J. W., Jr 66 

Rutenburg, A. M 92 

Rutstein, D. D 11,87 

Sachs, B 78 

Sagall, E. L 64 

Saunders, G. A 63 

Scannell, J. G 90 

Schall, LeR. A 97 

Schatzki, R 79 

Scheinberg, T. H 81 

Schepens, C. L 78 

Schilling, R. F 66 

Schlesinger, M. J 56 

Schmid, K 51 

Schmidt, W. C 54 

Schmidt, W. M 83 

Schoen, E. J 83 

Scholander, P. F 52 

Schulz, M. D 79 

Schulz, R. Z 56 

Schwab, R. S 72 

Schwartz, A. S 92 

Schwartz, R 82 

Scott, J. F 63 

Scully, R. E 56 



*5 2 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 






PAGE 

Seale, E. S 78 

Sears, B. R 92 

Sears, J. B 91 

Sedlezky, 1 80 

Seeler, A. 63 

Segel, A. L 91 

Seligman, A. M 89 

Seltser, R 83 

Selverstone, B 89 

Semrad, E. V 73 

Sewall, W. F 85 

Sexton, L. 1 86, 95 

Shands, H. C 74 

ShaufTer, I. A 79 

Shaw, J. H 101 

Sheddan, F. G., Jr 90 

Sheehan, E. B 95 

Sheldon, C. P 85 

Short, C. L 63 

Shwachman, H 81 

Siekevitz, P 66 

Silver, E. 1 103 

Simeone, F. A 89 

Simmons, F. A 94 

Simpson, R. B 51 

Sinex, F. M 51 

Singer, M 1 1, 47 

Slaunwhite, W. R., Jr 62 

Sloane, A. E 78 

Smith, C. A 80 

Smith, G. B 82 

Smith, G. Van S 94 

Smith, J. A 85 

Smith, O. W 94 

Smith, R. M 90 

Smith, S. R 74 

Smythe, R. L 48 

Snedeker, L 81 

SnifTen, R. C $6 

Snyder, F. F 47,85 

Snyder, J. C 54 

Sodi-Pallares, E 59 



Sognnaes, R. F 101 

Soholt, S. T. . . 96 

Solomon, A. K 50, 52 

Solomon, D. H 67 

Solomon, E. G 74 

Solomon, H. C 71 

Sommers, S. C $6 

Sosman, M. C 79 

Soutter, L 90 

Spector, L. B 66 

Spiegl, R. J 67 

Spiro, H. M 67 

Sprague, H. B 62 

Sprunt, W. H., 3d 80 

Stahl, N. McL 92 

Stanbury, J. B 62 

Stare, F. J 53 

Starr, A 90 

Stauffer, R. E 74 

Stearns, N. S 66 

Stearns, S 64 , 

Stein, H. J 64 | 

Sterling, K 66 

Sternstein, H. J 98 I 

Stetson, C. G 80 1 

Stetson, R. P 62 

Stillman, J. S., Jr 63 

Stockholm, H 74 

Stoll, G 92 : 

Stone, B. H 95 

Strauss, M. B 62 

Strittmatter, C. F., 4th 53 

Stuart, H. C 83 

Sturdevant, C. L 96 

Sturgis, S. H 94 

Sturnick, M. 1 64 

Suby, H. 1 90 

Sullivan, G. L., Jr 78 

Sullivan, J. F 74 \ 

Surgenor, D. M 51 

Susen, A. F 92 



TEACHING STAFF 



l 53 



PAGE 

Sveinsson, S. L 82 

Swan, R. C, Jr 66 

Swanson, J. N 67 

Swanson, L. T 103 

Swartz, J. H 70 

Sweet, P. LeB 103 

Sweet, R. H 88 

Sweet, W. H 89 

Swenson, 89 

Taft, E. B 57, 66 

Talbot, N. B 80 

Talkov, R. H 64 

Tansey, J. L 64 

Tartakoff, H. H 73 

Taylor, F. H. L 61 

Taylor, G. W 89 

Taylor, I. M 52 

Teabeaut, J. R., 2d 60 

iTefft, R. C, Jr 81 

Teng, C. T 53 

Thomas, R. A 58 

Thompson, G. E 101 

Thorn, G. W 43,61 

Thorndike, A 89 

Tibbetts, D. M 62 

JTimberlake, W. H 74 

! Tobin, L. H 66 

I Todd, D. P 90 

1 Tolman, M. M 70 

Tonning, H. 66 

Tosick, W. A 80 

Trethowan, W. H 75 

Trevett, L. D 72 

Trimble, H. C 52 

Trobaugh, F. E., Jr 64 

Trott, A. W 96 

iTucci, J. H 90 

Tucker, A. W., Jr 85, 95 

Turk, R. E 74 

, Turner, J., 2d 85 

Turtle, W. J 81 

Tuthill, J. W. G 81 



Twible, E. A 82 

Uhle, F. C 59 

Ulfelder, H 94 

Ulin, R 96 

Umbarger, H. E 54 

Ureles, A. L 67 

Uyeda, 1 83 

Uzmah, L. L 56 

Valadian, 1 83 

Valenstein, A. F 73 

Vallee, B. L 62 

vander Eecken, H 74 

Van Leeuwen, M. J 101 

Vaughan, J. H 67 

Vester, J. W 67 

Vickerv, A. L., Jr 56 

Viets, H. R 72 

Villee, C. A., Jr 52 

Waddell, W. R 92 

Waine, H 64 

Waksman, B. H 72 

Walcott, C. F 6 5 

Waldo, CM 11,48,103 

Walker, J. T 60 

Walker, P. H 92 

Walker, W. J 98 

Wallace, R. H 91 

Wallace, W. McL 80 

Wallerstein, R. D 66 

Walter, C. W 89 

Ware, P. F 91 

Warming-Larsen, A 83 

Warren, J. E 65 

Warren, R 89 

Warren, S 1 1, 56 

Warthin, T. A 63 

Watkin, D. M 66 

Watkins, A. L 61 

Watson, B. K 54 

Watson, C. W 74 

Way, H. S 96 

Wedgwood, R. J. P 83 



J 54 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 



Weekes, D. J 98 

Weille, F. L 97 

Weinberger, J. L 74 

Weiner, A. E 85 

Weiner, R. S 92 

Weinstein, L 81 

Weisberger, D 103 

Weisman, A. D 75 

Weisman, P. A 92 

Weiss, W. W 60 

Weiss, L. P 48 

Welch, C. E 89 

Weller, J. M 65 

Weller, T. H 58, 83 

Wermer, H 73 

Wessler, S 6s 

Westin, G. W 96 

Wheeler, E. 6s 

White, J. C 88 

White, LeM 73 

Wicks, E. S 58 

Wight, A 92 

Wilcox, P. E 51 

Wilkins, G. F 91 

Williams, C 65 

Williamson, C. R 6s 

Wilson, D. L 66 



Winsor, A. P 85 

Wislocki, G. B 47 

Wittenberg, J. B 54 

Wittenborg, M. H 79 

Wolff, L 62 

Wollenberger, A 59 

Wolsky, L 66 

Womack, C. R 66 

Wood, W. F 73 

Woodbury, J. W 66 

Wool, M 74 

Worcester, J 87 

Wright, E. A 59 

Wright, M. M 59 

Wyman, S. M 80 

Wynne, L. C 75 

Young, J. C. G 66 

Younge, P. A 94 

Zacharias, L. R 78 

Zamcheck, N 62 

Zamecnik, P. C 61 

Zaudy, E. C 82 

Zeller, J. W 63 

Zetzel, E. R 73 

Zetzel, L 62 

Zinkham, W. H 83 

Zoll, P. M 62 

Zygmuntowicz, A. S 82 



JUN ;^ 5 



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